"Bushcraft" A relative term?

Discussion in 'General Bushcraft Discussion' started by Mox wanders, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. Mox wanders

    Mox wanders Tracker

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    Hey everyone I know it's been a while. Life has been crazy since being back home from overseas. But I'll get into all that later. I've been practicing bushcraft for some time now and I'm just curious and hoping someone can enlighten me. So my question is.....is Bushcraft a broad term for anything you do outside these days or is it for strictly a "in the bush" crafting and living. Like for instance....the desert....wouldn't that be desertcraft? Or in the mountains mountaincraft? Or strictly making things out of wood is wood making or woodcraft. Just looking for a little input on the term I guess. Maybe it's just morphed into more of a wilderness survival term?
     
  2. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    If you changed the word survival to living or maybe activity, I'd say yes.

    Anymore I think the term, to most, encompasses a lot of ideas and activities. Almost to the point of meaninglessness, but I still think there is a distinction to be made.

    Personally, I think it is defined by a certain aesthetic and using natural resources you find at camp as opposed to modern camping where you bring in all your resources with you.
     
  3. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

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    Well, if you sleep out there, it's camping...if you make stuff with a stone blade while out, it's primitive skills. If you camp while doing primitive skills, I really don't know what to call it :4:

    Just semantics, IMO..."bushcraft" is a currently-well-recognized term containing a large range of outdoors activities. For me, it also includes the idea of trying to use natural, local materials in place of manmade, packed-in ones. My dad calls all this sort of stuff "woodsmanship".
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
  4. Black5

    Black5 Supporter Supporter

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    I remember the old term "woodsmanship." Haven't heard it in, maybe, decades?

    But I do remember my older family members who were avid hunters using the term to refer to skills you needed to stay alive in "the woods."
     
  5. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Bushcraft. It's just a word. :) There had to be a word to umbrella us all together, bushcraft is it. :)

    I personally don't classify my stuff as bushcraft. Most everything I do is deep woods kinda stuff, so if I had to add a title to me, it would be "woodsman". :)
     
  6. Mikewood

    Mikewood Supporter Supporter

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    I equate the bush to an African, Australian or Texas savana. Lots of brush and not s lot of heavy timber. I often wonder where people hang hammocks because those baobab trees are few and far between.

    Bushcraft is craft a bushman would use. I am not a bushman and ymmv.
     
  7. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Woodcraft was the American term up through the 1930s era.
    Bushcraft was the common term in the UK and Commonwealth.
    Bushcraft became the current generic, overarching term. Partly it was due to a societal antipathy to the term Survival, which became a synonym for military or for nut cases.

    If it bothers some one, just dont use it. I practice Plainscraft for the most part, with some Woodcraft.

    I know the difference, but if you try to search for info you get very little. Talk to others and you get confusion. It is what it is.
     
  8. MrFixIt

    MrFixIt Old Jarhead LB#42 Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Woodcraft is what my grandfather called outdoor activities (hunting, fishing, camping).
    I've also encountered the term "Woodslore".
     
  9. Raymond Eisele

    Raymond Eisele Scout

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    Bushcraft to me encompasses skills and abilities posessed by those living far from pavement. Mountain men, explorers, survivalist, hill people and such. Relying on the environment to provide food and shelter. Knowing how to get things done and the confidence to do so.
     
  10. John from Alberta

    John from Alberta Supporter Supporter

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    If you go by the sub title of Mors Kochanski's book "Bushcraft", it's "Outdoor Skills and Wilderness Survival". I think that's a pretty succinct summation personally.
     
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  11. insector

    insector Supporter Supporter

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    There was a book written by George Washington Sears in 1884- "Woodcraft". One of the first books written on camping back then. He was also a writer for the first editions of Field and Stream magazine so he promoted the term. His pen name was "Nessmuk" and I believe he invented that design of outdoor fixed blade knives.......................among other things.

    I think bushcraft stems from that time. As said above, it is semantics. I think it means pretty much what you make of it. Marketing surely also plays a role............... but I think bushcraft is more camping and packing than survival and so is used as a different term..........

    Sears book is still being published and I plan to get a copy here one day. It is a good reference for camping in general.......
     
  12. mountainman11b

    mountainman11b Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    The way I view it,

    bush is a general term used to describe a wilderness environment.

    Craft is making things

    I view bushcraft as the practice of wilderness improvising.

    I think, carving spoons, carving cups, making cordage, building a useful shelter out of materials provided by nature etc when I hear the term bushcraft, basically being able to make life more comfortable for you in the event of an unfortunate event, Whether it be in a survival situation, or you broke your chair at camp.

    Bushcraft is a needed foundation to almost all outdoor activities. It may not be the primary focus of that activity, and it make not come in handy every time but sooner or later in some way or fashion the skills learned and practiced while bushcraftimg will come in handy and save you a lot of heartache and impress a lot of folks watching at the same time.
     
  13. trailhermit

    trailhermit Supporter Supporter

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    I like how Bushcraft USA has the subtitle "Home of the American Woodsman."

    Now we all don't have skills or access to property to go out and build supershelters. But we ALL can develop skills and appreciate the outdoors and natural world around us.

    So to me, bushcraft is learning to use the natural resources around us and passing on our love, respect, and/or knowledge of these skills to others.
     
  14. bosque bob

    bosque bob Guide

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    I like the Victorian term; woods lounging. Best description for me anyway.
     
  15. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB 42 Supporter

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    I used to be a hiker (even an ultralight one) and camper. I used whatever the latest, lightest, fastest technology was. It was all minimalist.

    Comfort was sacrificed for speed.
    Taste was sacrificed for efficiency.
    Skill was supplanted by technology.

    Today I use antiquated (and let's face it, impractical) methods that take a long time. I build rickety shelters and use inefficient cooking methods. I haul a cast iron pan around and cover little distance.
    But I have a lot of fun practicing and improving these crafts.

    And then that philosophy started to seep into my every day life. Going back to old technologies. More hand tools, more outdoor cooking. Looking at life and the world from a slower, simpler perspective.

    And that's where I am. Bushcraft is what you want it to be.
     
  16. wallflash

    wallflash Supporter Supporter

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    Bush is what Australians call the woods or forests ( and I know I am not dropping any bombshells here :)) Mors popularized the term here in his books , but admitted he got the term from an Australian writer . Mors classic book ( originally entitled Northern Bushcraft) was a North American take on these books about survival in the wilds of Australia. The writer of these books founded a WW2 unit that rescued soldiers out of the Australian wilds .


    https://www.amazon.com/10-Bushcraft...=Richard+Graves&qid=1566298106&s=books&sr=1-1



    So bush simply means woods, and is synonymous with what we called woodscraft before Mors made the term popular. Mors was held in such esteem that other survival personalities started using the term as well.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2019
  17. bluecow

    bluecow Scout

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    I think it is much like "skilsaw" for circular saw as opposed to a Skil circular saw. every body knows what ya mean. As for me while i like this site I never all myself a bushcrafter. More like a woods bum as I don't craft anything more than memories. The only skills I practice are hunting, fishing, knocking about and laying around.
     
  18. Akela

    Akela Scout

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    Bushcraft can occur in numerous places.
    I stumbled across the following definition, which indicates how varied the locations can be...

    the bush - wild or uncultivated country
    synonyms: wilds · remote areas · wilderness · the backwoods · the hinterland(s) ·the backcountry · the backland · the outback · the backblocks · the booay · the backveld · the platteland · the boondocks · the boonies · the tall timbers · beyond the black stump

    I do like that term "Woodslore", perhaps because lore is an Old English word that goes back to distant times (some say at least to the 12th century).
    One meaning of lore is knowledge, which has traditionally been passed down by word of mouth, like tribal lore.
    And I picture our families somewhere out in the bush, practicing a part of the craft by building an evening cooking fire, and then later watching the flames flicker and dance and the embers glow, as we talk and pass our Woodslore on to those who learn and practice, and will then teach it themselves some day.
     
  19. Noddy

    Noddy Scout

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    Someone, I think probably with a fair helping of snide, once described bushcraft as a role-playing game for the English woods. It took me a while to come to terms with the fact that this is OK, and played :) The last thing you should do is take bushcraft on all earnest like. There is always someone going to call you out for not following their made up rules, why put yourself in the way of them.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2019
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  20. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

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    When I was a little kid living in interior AK, "the bush" just meant wilderness in general...nobody used the term "bushcraft" that I can recall, though.
     
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  21. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    What some places dialectically refer to as the forest or the woods, other places refer to as the bush,,, A fellow from Canada, where the they refer to the woods or forest as the “the bush”, wrote a book about woodcraft, and naturally called it Bushcraft... Folks with other dialects picked up on it...

    Makes no never mind to me what it means or what it’s called,,, can’t legally do much of it here in the colonies anyway unless you’re on private property, usually within sight of a house. Most every place has laws governing what can or cannot be done on public lands,,, mostly it comes down to don’t touch anything, and don’t any leave trace of your passing. A forester, woodsman, bushman, or proper “bushcrafter” is gonna be moving things around, and leaving sign of their passing.

    As to the survival aspect,,, unless a fella is none too bright, or has the proverbial “one in a million” accident beyond his control, it just isn’t a thing...
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2019
  22. backlasher

    backlasher Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    To me, Bushcraft is more of a philosophy than anything else. It's not survival. It's not bending nature to our will but living in harmony with it. Older technologies seem to lend themselves better to this mindset.
     
  23. Warlantactical

    Warlantactical Tracker

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    i came in late to the part but looks like everyone answered the same bushcraft to me is anything you craft in the wilderness .
     
  24. buckfynn

    buckfynn Old Geezer Lifetime Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Before the days of the interenet, the term bushcraft was unheard of in the Western US. Wordscraft or being a woodsman was the common term.

    But far as bushcraft being a relative term, one just has to look at all the topics it covers here under the BCUSA forum.
     
  25. Don_Parsons

    Don_Parsons Tracker

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    Each of us get to pick and choose how much Bushcraft we bring to the table...

    Sometimes humans can live life complete with rocks, sticks and things around them,,, others might like the old school stuff or the high tech to add value of the easier things in life...

    A tin cup, sharp steel knife, an axe or tent sure make things easier...

    Nothing wrong with a hard shell when needed that allows for the Rock and stick to hang out when it's needed,,, kinda like the 50/50... at times I live in todays world,,, some times I slip into the past with just the close on my back to rest under a tree at night...

    On the clear nights I dream under the stars,,, hard to do this at -67 F in the winter months,,, most humans today would only last seconds if they only had a rock and stick,,, having animal hides to wrap up in might of been a good plan... Ha

    Yuppers,,, Bushcraft is what you make of it,,, some want less,,, others need a fraction of it well others live the dream and comforts of tech that allows them to cover great distances with out traveling with the human tribe...

    Very hard to remain on this planet with out community,,, this might be why this awesome forum exist,,, an idea to get us up to speed on how far we choose to push the limits if there is such a thing...

    Cheers from the North
     
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  26. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

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    To me bushcraft comes from australian term
    Where one would go in the bush with just basic supplies and make use of everything around them for what they need food/shelter/water
    Going out with a pack full of gear is camping to me not bushcraft
     
  27. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Bushcraft and "the bush" are not specifically Australian in origin. The terms were used in Canada, South Africa, and other parts of the British Empire and later Common Wealth.
    The usage in the US comes from both Australia and Canada, and dates back to at least WWII. Troops in Australia picked it up, and exposure to Graves phamplets on Bushcraft ( made into a book by the mid 1950s) helped spread the usage. It long predates the "Interwebz" , hard as that is for some to believe. I bought my first copy of Graves book about 1960 or 1962, in a used bookstore here in Texas. History really does go back further than the internet. Heck, some of us even remember Fidonet and BBS or bulletin boards.
    :)
     
  28. S.Decker

    S.Decker Supporter Supporter

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    Bushcraft is only relative, if you bring your cousin along.:54:
     
  29. CosmicJoke

    CosmicJoke Supporter Supporter

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    When I hear or read the term "bushcraft" I get mixed emotions. I do not consider myself a "bushcrafter", I consider my self an outdoorsman. Do I have skills that seem to be a subset for "bushcrafting"? Yes for the most part. Most of the skill set isn't rocket science, it's common sense we all have, it's just up to the individual to use and familiarize themselves with those skills.

    Sorry if I ruffle feathers, but making a chair or table from wood you found on the ground may take skill, but it shouldn't take you a 200 page book to learn how to do it. The same with basic debris shelters, and I don't see many making those anymore. Getting strong enough wood to sustain the weight of 3-4' of actual debris to really make it waterproof takes a lot of time and work, and not done over night in most cases.

    I think more or less in this day and age, it may be a 'relative' term encompassing different aspects, ideals, and moral standing on what it means and how you interpret it. Many scoff at newer gear and if it's not "old school" it's not true bushcraft, that's just crazy to me. Some of those same people use mini gas stoves or alcohol stoves. Nothing really "bushcrafty" about that. Use what you have, make use of what's around you, and most of all enjoy your time in the woods.

    It's also become way to commercialized these days. It seems as though many videooligists on social media are selling you gear, shirts, hats, underwear, socks, or even male enhancement drugs :eek: ( I have seen at least 4 big channels have videos who have been sponsored by this stuff ). Some seem to care more about cinematography then the content.

    Meh......

    Final thought:
    I feel the term "bushcraft" is what you make of it as long as the core skill set and values of respecting nature remain.
     
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  30. insector

    insector Supporter Supporter

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    Hardcore "bushmen" . After a gemsbok I believe in the Kalahari............. My image of bushcrafters

    :D 20190820_122823.jpg
     
  31. CosmicJoke

    CosmicJoke Supporter Supporter

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    NOPE! I don't care what anyone says, I ain't runnin' bare 4$$3d in no bush! If that's a rule, I'm out!
     
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  32. insector

    insector Supporter Supporter

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    LOL! "I am never going hunting with you again"



    famous last bushcrafter words

    :4:
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2019
  33. Akela

    Akela Scout

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    GreyOne,
    I'm inclined to push it back a bit further in time, considering that many a former WWI flyer became a "Bush Pilot" about a year or so after that war came to an end, and numerous surplus aircraft suddenly became available to those seat-of-the-pants aviators who could scratch the funds together to buy one. ;)
     
  34. wallflash

    wallflash Supporter Supporter

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    I wouldn’t consider camping , hiking and associated skills such as fire making role playing, any more than fishing or hunting is role playing . It’s just enjoying being in nature . Not that there is anything wrong with role playing . I have wanted to dress up and do the mountain man rendezvous, but just haven’t gotten the period clothing yet . Too much other stuff happens when I start looking at that . One day I will pretend to be a mountain man from the 1840’s with no qualms :) . I would prefer to pretend to be an Indian but I don’t know how prevalent beer bellies were among Native Americans :D


    I can’t agree more :) . I found this place by looking for rendezvous and landed in the events section. Then I started looking around and found the Bushclass area and thought “wow, just what I’ve been looking for for my grandson!”. Then I found the Hardswoodsman thread and got even more excited . But then I read further and encountered the “ my way or the highway” attitude, along with comments along the lines of “ if you don’t like the idea that I might reject your submission because I woke up on the wrong side of the bed or because my wife burned my oatmeal and I’m just pizzed, don’t attempt it”, and I thought, who needs this kind of crap ? I’m in this for the fun and enjoyment of it and not to please someone or some group of guys with a complex . And so I learn them and might one day post them for my own satisfaction, and won’t give a darn what someone thinks about the fact that I didn’t film it just the way he wanted it filmed or didn’t do it exactly like he thought it had to be done.

    Have fun. Ignore the boneheads .
     
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  35. Forestree

    Forestree Treeforest Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    I started a thread “What is bushcraft?” 5 years ago when I was new here. It got merged into another thread......from the dark depths of bcusa..... https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/why-should-we-define-bushcraft.60643/page-4#post-2029802

    I have a better handle on what it is now....and it encompasses many skills and limitless knowledge. Some I’m decent in and others I’m just not knowledgeable or skilled at. Always something new to learn about the natural world and what you can do with it.

    Not every section of the forum is specific to bushcraft, but is nice to have other places to talk about stuff closely related. I do feel that the core of it is true primitive living skills and knowledge. Doing stuff with nothing but the resources you can find in nature.
     
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  36. Woodpuppy

    Woodpuppy Tracker

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    I’m gonna start reading “Two Little Savages” to my kids here shortly. The older twins (almost 8) have their own Mora Companions, and will be getting ferro rods shortly. Then we’re gonna build a fire ring in the back yard. It’ll soon be time for cooking dogs, sausages and brats over coals and s’mores.
     
  37. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter

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  38. NJStricker

    NJStricker Supporter Supporter

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    Bushcraft, as has been mentioned before, is the British/Canadian/Australian term. Here in the US it had been woodcraft or woodlore, going back to probably the 1870's. Before that it was just life on the American frontier.

    Is the term relative? Yes. And for me, the way it is applied is a bit of a conundrum.

    I don't know if the term woodcraft was used much before George Washington Sears (Nessmuk). It more than likely was, by other writers of the time (1870's onward) but those writers are less known today. Sears' writing was a reaction to the times. America was growing, the east coast was becoming heavily industrialized, and the growing urban population was beginning to feel the effects of an industrialized, urban lifestyle. It became the fashion for the upper class to go to the rural countryside to recover one's health, and there were a number of lodges, or camps, in upstate New York (the Adirondacks were especially popular), Pennsylvania (Catskills) and New England that catered to these new interests of the up and coming urban elite. (For a bit of context, this period in the late 1800's was the same time period that Teddy Roosevelt went west to hunt.)

    The amount of time this new urban elite would spend in these lodge camps varied from weeks to a couple of months in the summer, and so they usually brought their "stuff" with them. They weren't camping, they were staying for extended vacations and so it wasn't unheard of for the vacationers to bring a wagon load of gear with them, and hire staff to portage it from the train stations to the lodges. Many of these New York, Boston, and Philadelphia urbanites had already lost any connection to a rural upbringing and the frontier skills of their forefathers. They would stay at a lodge, and the porters would transport them on day trips to a hot springs (spa), to go fishing, set up a cabin tent for a couple of days, etc., before returning to their rooms full of their stuff in the lodge.

    Sears recognized that many of the burdens of urban life that these people were trying to take a respite from, were burdens they brought with them--wagon loads of stuff. They were making a pleasurable experience in the north woods less pleasurable--they were roughing it. Sears' writing was about smoothing it--putting the material goods of the city behind, and experiencing the wilderness as simply as possible. Instead of bringing lots of "stuff" he wrote about minimal kit, and using woodcraft or woodlore (skills, knowledge) to provide the rest wherever one found themselves. Sears himself was known for "smoothing it." He was short, and small of stature, and so favored light gear that he could carry. He was definitely capable of spending extended time in the remote forests, but usually he was travelling from camp to camp and staying at the very lodges he descried in his writings.

    Sears is sometimes considered to be an early proponent of ultralight backpacking. I don't know how accurate that is, but from his writings we can deduce that he was a fan of light gear, and was not opposed to making his own gear or having it made to his description. His style of camping, by modern standards, was high impact on the areas used. All of that was consistent with the times. Not everything was commercially made and it was still common to have craftsmen/tradesmen make tools or other items to order. Heavy timbering to supply building materials for a growing US population was the norm, so cutting small trees and evergreen boughs to build a shelter frame upon which to stretch a canvas tarp and make a bough bed was considered light use with little impact.

    I would venture to say that the period of American history in which "woodcraft" was developed and refined was from the 1870's to the 1930's, and ran concurrently with the American conservation movement. On this site we often mention other writers such as Muir, Kephart, or Whelen. Even Zane Grey, while generally a fiction writer, wrote about the health benefits of those moving from the urban industrialized east to the western, wild, states.

    I find modern bushcraft (woodcraft) today to be a conundrum because often those pursuing the lifestyle do so by emulating the gear and techniques of that time period (1870's to 1930's). That is fine, if re-enactment is your thing. It's really not that different from a longhunter re-enactor imitating a style of frontier exploration into the Kentucky wilderness in the 1750's.

    But I think that is where people start to get tripped up. They start roughing it, instead of smoothing it. I see newcomers to this site asking if they are doing things right and what is the correct gear to buy, and some of the more experienced here telling them they are doing it wrong. They become burdened by the "stuff." Who cares what knife a person uses because some British ex-military guy said it's the one to use? Is a 7-cup aluminum coffee pot issued to Canadian troops and used by a particular survival instructor THE official, end-all-be-all bushcraft cooking pot? Is a canvas backpack that doesn't use a modern suspension system really the best way to carry your bushcraft gear? Maybe it is, if you are a re-enactor.

    I apologize for writing so much and taking so much time to get here. Bushcraft, or woodcraft, I think is about finding yourself and your way in the outdoors. It's not about imitating a camping style that was used over 100 years ago, though we can learn a lot about the skills that have been lost to others. It is about developing outdoor skills, finding gear that personally suits you (buying it, making it, or having it made), and generally having a good experience away from our day to day life.
     
  39. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

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    I've noticed there's a "Bushcraft Style", too...some folks like to have their stuff look a certain way (often vintage/canvas/leather/etc) while others of us don't much care how anything looks :p. No judgement, just something to consider.
     
  40. NJStricker

    NJStricker Supporter Supporter

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    Re-enactors.

    Some do longhunter, some do Civil War. Some do 1890-style camping.

    Someday I'm going to dress as a pirate when I go camp.
     
  41. DavidJAFO

    DavidJAFO Keeper of the Clubhouse swear jar Supporter

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    hello,
    @Black5 I'm old school, it was known here across the pond as woodsmanship aka pioneering, or under the collective name of outward-bound.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outward_Bound the survival weaponry & techniques (guns & knives) aspect IMO came to the UK from the U.S in the early 1980s post-Rambo movie, then this was seen as subversive (fact). The day the SAS stormed the Iranian Embassy (known as the Iranian Embassy siege) which took place from 30th April to 5th May 1980 every man & his dog was a member of the SAS (the largest Regiment in the world) the Walter Mitty's of this world then incorporated this into what is now known as Bushcraft. :)
    Regards
    David
     
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  42. DavidJAFO

    DavidJAFO Keeper of the Clubhouse swear jar Supporter

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    hello,
    @S.Decker Yeah very much like the definition of camping, loitering with intent (within tent) :8: sorry!!
    Regards
    David
     
  43. Moe M.

    Moe M. Supporter Supporter

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    In my opinion, to come close to quoting a saying from the "Nam" "It don't mean $hit", really, more arguments have started over terminology than is necessary, what's the definition of a backpacker, what's the difference between a bush crafter and a camper, does it really matter, as long as you are doing your thing and enjoying it, why does it need a specific title, just call it dirt time and let it go at that. :34:
     
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  44. Black5

    Black5 Supporter Supporter

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    But if you're in the desert wouldn't it be "sand time?"

    Kidding...kidding...

    I think we get wound up too much on classifying every aspect of our lives by using terminology to show we "belong" to a group.

    It's a shame that in our technological society, with access to thousands, millions, of people, we lack a sense of belonging without a moniker to show our membership.
     
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  45. Forestree

    Forestree Treeforest Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    I don’t mention the word “bushcraft” to anyone....because then they ask what that is and then I have to explain my definition. Better to say camping or hiking....everyone knows what those are
     
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  46. Black5

    Black5 Supporter Supporter

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    Anything I do with a knife or fire outside my wife considers Bushcraft.

    Example: Clearing a fence row is Bushcraft because I use a blade and burn the cut vegetation.

    Cutting hay is Bushcraft because the mower has blades.

    Stacking hay is Bushcraft because I'm essentially building a debris shelter.

    Mowing the yard is Bushcraft.
    ( Reference mowing hay.)

    See what I'm getting at?:confused:
     
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  47. BradGad

    BradGad Supporter Supporter

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    I have long pondered the term, and long thought that something like “woodscraft” would be better. I would rather aspire to become a true woodsman than a real bushcrafter.

    As it happens, just yesterday, @wallflash posted something intriguing on the Roughians Reading List just yesterday. Evidently Mors Korchanski, who is probably the one man most responsible for solidifying the term “bushcraft”, was influenced by Richard Graves, an Aussie... and I hear they call it the “bush” down under.

    (No offense to our brethren on the Great Plains or the Great American Desert, where “woods” is a nominal notion.)
     
  48. Cascadian

    Cascadian Guide

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    Everyone here has different physical abilities, skills, and comfort levels.

    But what unites everyone is a desire, no matter how modestly implemented, to reach from our world of obscene opulence back to outdoor basics.
     
  49. Burlap

    Burlap Tracker

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    Who cares about evry nit and pik of what bushcraft means. Just get out and enjoy doing it.
     
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  50. jswi2374

    jswi2374 Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    I do think bushcraft is relative to the person and environment. For the lady living in NYC, bushcraft might be setting up a tarp shelter in Central Park for a bit of shade. For a suburbanite like myself, it's a cast iron skillet and lunch over an open fire. The guy living in Alaska builds a natural shelter and carves some eating utensils. Each of us is deliberately using new skills and the resources in our environment to enjoy our outdoor time more.
    If it's done everyday, it's just life. If it's unintentional, that's survival. Bushcraft is deliberate, intentional, recreational, and challenging.
     
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