Compact Sleep System

Discussion in 'Sleep Systems' started by GunGoBoom, Aug 31, 2016.

  1. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    DIY a short zipper [ or snaps] and a drawcord in the foot perhaps?
    Otherwise make your own is a good way to go
    PHD in England will be having a sale soon and a single layer synthetic overbag will be in it, no idea on the price tho but the falling UK Pound may make buying from there attractive

    nov-sale-preview-19-10-16.pdf
     
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  2. reppans

    reppans Scout

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    Wow... I couldn't use mine anywhere near the 30s without wearing all my daytime clothing/jackets. Did you fasten/tighten the belt under your back/NeoAir? That helps a lot keeping the upper sides tucked in.

    For DIY mods, as mentioned early, you could swap the male/female Velcro strips on one side, that would give you the ability to Velcro a half sleeping bag for your lower half/legs. The footbox/drawstring work well for feet, but it really needs a neck drawstring to seal the heat loss from the neck/shoulder area - it works well on my JRB poncho/quilt, sorta "hooks" on my shoulders. A bivy would help too of course.
     
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  3. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    I was wearing my fleece jacket. I guess that is an important note.

    I did not buckle it around the pad but that is a good point.
     
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  4. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    Is this a member here? I want make this but slightly shorter with 5oz climashield and velcro instead of snaps.
     
  5. remington79

    remington79 Scout

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    The pool type air mattress won't do you any good for cold weather. The reason Thermarest and similar mattresses work is because they have foam inside to provide insulation from the ground. The pool type mattress and the similar cheap camping type ones such as those for family tents won't work. They are just a bladder that hold air and since there is insulation the air will just keep taking your heat away.

    I tried the ranger roll one time and never again. Since the poncho isn't breathable I ended up with condensation on the entire inside and woke up cold with a wet poncho liner.
     
  6. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    Not sure I follow. I'm using a Thermarest Neoair Xlite not a pool floatie.
     
  7. remington79

    remington79 Scout

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    I was just saying that for other's benefit because it was mentioned by someone else some odd number of posts back.

    added text: On Thermarest's website they list the R value that each pad has.
     
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  8. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    Aww, gotcha.
     
  9. DavidEnoch

    DavidEnoch Scout

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    I have enjoyed reading this thread. I think that it would be worthwhile if we all carried some emergency overnight gear. 3 pounds of sleep and shelter gear can make all the difference in the world. And, if you carry better sleep and shelter gear the axe, hatchet, big knife, or saw may not be necessary.

    Some mentioned using browse or natural materials for bedding. I think it is dangerous to count on finding dry natural bedding. When you need it the most, on cold rainy nights, it is very hard to find.

    The original poster wanted something to fit in a waist pack. I often use a Vietnam era waist belt , butt pack, and harness. I find it to be comfortable. The butt pack is expandable and also you can strap gear on both the bottom and top of the butt pack. I like those options.

    David Enoch
     
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  10. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    Alright folks, I am in my backyard in an SOL Escape Bivy with my Doobie Express. I am using a Thermarest Xlite and I am on a concrete floor (worst case scenario). It is 30┬░ and I intend to wait at least 30 mins to see how this works out before I head inside to my nice warm bed :)

    ETA: I am wearing lightweight fleece pj pants, a white t-shirt, cotton athletic socks, and a wool beanie.

    Screenshot_2016-12-30-22-02-15.png
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2016
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  11. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    I've been out here for about 40 mins now. I am toasty warm and outside of feeling constricted by the bivy and cold spots on my heels where my feet are off of my pad I have no complaints. I brought out the thermometer for reference.

    This is the surface temperature of the grill beside me... 20161230_224120.jpg


    This is the interior of the bag (angled up so it did not measure my skin)...
    20161230_224142.jpg

    I am very happy with this result. This time of year I wouldn't be out without some sort of jacket so that should add a few more degrees of comfort and throw in a hot water bottle and I think this is a viable 3 season setup in most of the country.
     
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  12. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    I suggest another experiment using the SOL bivvy with the blanket on the outside to see if that combination is warmer; as I suspect it may be by a few degrees; followed by one complete night using what you would consider your normal outside clothing plus that LW jacket you mentioned.
    I'm very interested in your experiments as I will need a set of gear that will allow me some sleep if I get stuck on the road during the ski season and I miss the bus again, although I have allowed myself a good bit more room it isn't that much bigger than 12 litres in total
     
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  13. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    There will definitely be more experiments but they most likely won't come until after Spring. I am leaving town for work in a few days and won't be back until March.

    You may be right about draping the Doobie on top. My only concern is that the Doobie is being held in place by the bivy and I would end up with cold spots on my sides/shoulders. That was the problem I had when I used the Doobie alone. I'm sure it was being compressed to some extent this time but the fact that I could still move my arms around inside the bivy makes me believe it was minimal.

    As for total volume, I have pretty well just gone back to using a daypack. The good news is that this setup will allow me to use a small daypack (Camelbak Hawg) for overnight and potentially multiday trips with food included in a small and light package.
     
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  14. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    Good work dude... Now that you've got it figured out, maybe I'll go back and see what I can steal. Thanks! (love seeing "live" experiments!)
     
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  15. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    I think some light shockcord and snaps would fix the doobie issues, glove snaps weigh so little and that is all that's needed
     
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  16. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    That would probably work. There are some straps on the Doobie that I still haven't tried yet. I'll have to try a few different options.
     
  17. 8thsinner

    8thsinner Guide Bushclass I

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    I quite like this set up but you don't say what sort of bivi that is. I would like to know.
    I have a trifecta mk2 on order but not sure yet what it's compressed size is going to be...
     
  18. oathkeeper762

    oathkeeper762 Bushbum & PT Wanderer Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I totally agree with Seeker. I've been using down bags since I was a Boy Scout, and I'm 57 now. I have hunted, canoed, and backpacked in 17 different states and three countries in all types of weather conditions without any major issues , all while using down bags and more recently quilts. I have had occasions when my bag got damp but drying was never an issue, and they did not lose any significant insulating ability even when I got in the bag with wet or damp clothing on.

    As Seeker mentioned, the modern shells go a long way in the overall protection scheme of keeping the down dry and if you exercise reasonable care I think you will be pleasantly surprised. I have tried several of the modern insulations that were supposed to be better or equal to down, but for me personally down rules. It's light weight, insulates exceptionally well, and compresses to very manageable pack size. Plus, there's nothing I like better than knowing when I crawl into my bag at night I will sleep warm. The only downside is the older I get the harder it is for me to roll out of my warm down bag on a cold frosty morning!

    I have no experience with the new hydro series of down that is supposedly more resistant to loosing its loft in wet conditions. Nor have I ever used down bags in a bivy but I've been thinking about giving a bivy a shot. YMMV.
     
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  19. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    If I recall correctly @Cro is using a Raven Omni bivy.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2017
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  20. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom I'm not lost, I've just misplaced myself. Supporter Bushclass I

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    I have a Feathered Friends bag. I love it. I just don't trust it for late season bow fishing trips. I haven't had any problems yet but I spend alot of time actually in the water. Again, I love my Feathered Friends bag but for this purpose it isn't ideal.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2016
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  21. Woodsman Wannabe

    Woodsman Wannabe Scout

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    What 'sleeping bag' are you using? (looks like a sleeping bag to me) Or is it the coat that you show?
     
  22. reppans

    reppans Scout

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    Hehe... it's a multi-tasker, down quilt/poncho/serape - Jacks-R-Better Sierra Stealth (~2 season/40F). HERE it is with their hood. They make warmer versions for 3-4 season use.
     
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  23. StoneBeard

    StoneBeard BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    A suggestion for all inclusive sleep/ waterproof shelter I present for consideration:

    Snowyside eVent® Bivy:


    An ultralight, packable bivy made with ultra breathable 3 layer eVent fabric. Whether you are a mountaineer, thru-hiker, or bikepacker, it is a great choice for a minimalist shelter that will provide complete protection from unpredictable and harsh mountain weather. No need for a tarp or anything else, it can be used on its own as a complete shelter.

    Features:
    • 13.9oz
    • 3 layer eVent fabric top is extremely breathable and 100% waterproof
    • High Quality sil/PU coated waterproof bottom
    • Removable netting for bug protection when the weather is nice
    • Storm flap over closure
    • Waterproof YKK zipper runs across the top and down the side 20", making it a breeze to get in and out of
    • Stake loops at top and bottom
    • Stuff sack included
    • Can be compressed down to the size of a softball, making it the smallest packing fully enclosed waterproof bivy on the market.
    • We recommend McNett's Seam Grip for seam sealing
    Specs:
    • Fits users up to 6'4".
    • 76in girth at shoulders
    • 64in girth at feet
    • Weight: 13.9oz

    Paired with the ground pad of your choice ( I personally would use the NeoAir Xtherm (20 oz) for its packability, size, weight and R value) you would have a bombproof very warm shelter. Using this combo you could confidently carry a 30dg down quilt (16-17 oz) without fear of wet down. This quilt would also compress to the size of a grapefruit and could be carried in a smaller CF sack which would guarantee it stayed dry were you caught in a down pour and needed some time to move out and set up. This system would fit in a butt pack and weigh in under 3.5#. That's pretty good for sleep/shelter in a pinch.

    Hope this is helpful and good luck!
     
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  24. Red Wing

    Red Wing Supporter Supporter

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    I have their spextre sleeping bag which is pretty much a waterproof down bivvy sleepingbag. Its my expedition bag.
     
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  25. mtwarden

    mtwarden Supporter Supporter

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    I use an eVENT bivy (mine is from MLD) both for planned overnighters where I'm going to be using a snow cave or snow trench (or occasionally for very light/fast trips) AND sometimes as part of both my day hunting and winter day hiking pack. Planned overnighters it's combined with an appropriate rated quilt and pad, in my day pack it's combined with either a DIY Climashield Apex quilt or custom down "elephant foot" bag and a short length of ccf pad.

    I'll sometimes pack the lighter and smaller SOL Escape bivy in lieu of the eVENT one in warmer weather and less remote areas- it's really not too bad a bivy- a wee bit of on the smaller side, but breathes relatively well while still keeping heat in.

    MLD bivy on a fast & light trip

    [​IMG]
     
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