Compact Widerness Srvival & First Aid Guides?hialighweight

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Acropolis5, Oct 28, 2018.

  1. Acropolis5

    Acropolis5 Tracker

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    Friends, I need your advice. I have been asked by my young adult son to build a light weight emergency day hike kit, to serve he and his wife. Something in the 10-12lb. range + water. My son has some first-aid knowledge, but no survival knowledge. His wife is similarly situate. Both of them are relatively fit, very smart, good common sense and have some willingness to gain knowledge.

    It will be a one-bag backpack kit, with room to be leftover for snacks, water and a bit of extra clothing. I’m thinking of a North Face Recon bag. The larger old style, ~2,200cu. in. , because it’s comfortable, easy to carry, good quality, has 2 outside bottle pockets and I have an extra one in pristine condition.

    They will be doing day-hikes, 2-6 hours, 3 seasons, no winter or late fall, in New York State, Assume locations in the “ Gunks” around Lake Mohonk area. Some rock scrambling included. The kit is intended to keep them warm, dry, out of the unexpected storm, for 1-2 nights, til help reaches them after they get lost or someone severely twists a knee, type of survival. Assumption is they will be properly dressed.

    I’m comfortable with my planned kit content list for survival & first aid items. I’m an experienced day-hiker, cross-country skier/ snowshoe hiker and an experienced EMT. However, if you have any special ideas, I’d be glad to read them.

    My question is what are the best light, compact, easy to use, survival and first-aid books or booklets to provide as emergency guides? Now, I will say that I have already ordered “The Pocket Outdoor Survival Guide” , J. Wayne Fears (2011 Ed.) and the NOLS Wilderness Medicine Pocket Guide ( current Ed.) for the kit. But, the costs were small, so if you can give me better suggestions, I can still order different books.

    NOTE: I already ruled out the old Lee Nadling Survival Cards, even though I have a spare copy. IMO, they are not comprehensive enough. Same objection to the tiny but waterproof Ron Coredes Guides to survival & first aid. The other waterproof guides seem too big & heavy? Ur views are welcome.

    Thanx to all, in advance.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2018
  2. Acropolis5

    Acropolis5 Tracker

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    P. S. Sorry, I don’t know how I screwed-up the title. I cannot figure out how to edit the title. Mods, feel free to correct it.
     
  3. K7JLJ

    K7JLJ Tracker

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    My experience is that you need to know it before you need it.

    First aide is one of the few things that falls into this category.

    Can they take a class? CERT has free classes that would go above basic first aid, or check with the local County S&R for wilderness aid classes.
     
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  4. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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    @Acropolis5 I have no suggestions on books. There are many threads here on day pack contents. As you are an experienced hiker/EMT, what do you put in them?

    One suggestion I always make (and do), is to vacuum seal some socks/undies/TP with roll removed. If you get dunked, pack and all, it's nice to know you can have at least dry socks. Vac sealed, they also take much less space.

    Make sure clothing is very dry before sealing, so they won't mold.
     
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  5. Acropolis5

    Acropolis5 Tracker

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    K7 : I’d love for them to take a first-aid class. Not gonna happen. They both work long hours and have urban enjoyment weekends. They might read the books. I’ve given my son some first aid training over the years.

    Marbleman: Vaccum packed socks r on my list. I’m planning Palmer Furnaces for emergency heating. The kit will include 2, Exotac 30hr. candles, Adventure Medical PE reflective blankets (pocket-sized) and sil-tarp ponchos. Basic but effective. I’ll also include something for a ground sheet. Either a HD barrel liner or heavier aluminized blanket.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2018
  6. Sandcut

    Sandcut Sed ego sum homo indomitus Vendor

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    To be honest, if they weren't serious enough to sit through a course to gain the experience and knowledge therein, I wouodn't provide them with more than a boo boo kit and I wouldn't give them a first aid guide for their pack. As was said upthread, the time to start learning first aid is not right when someone becomes injured or ill.

    Providing gear with no knowledge only serves to lull people into a false sense of security.

    Just my $0.02.
     
  7. woodsmanjohn

    woodsmanjohn Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    As aready stated It's always better to seek out proper training. What kind of traveling in the wilds does he do mostly on trail or bushwhacking. I enjoy reading books but that is no subsitute for actual training or dirt time to practice the skills. It's just not wise to head out without at least testing out what you have read. But if that is all you have I would probably go with Wilderness travel Medicine by Eric Weiss small and compact covers a good bit. Maye the smaller version of the SAS survival manuel By JLW. Both of these are good compact books. Again reading a book and puting stuff into practice on the fly could result in a bad ouctome. But would be better than nothing. Sounds like you are already aware of this though. I would keep trying to talk him into seeking out training or at least practice the skills on his on. It's fun
     
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  8. Medic17

    Medic17 Guide Bushclass I

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  9. K7JLJ

    K7JLJ Tracker

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    Are you able to spend an hour with them?

    I'd cover the basics, on stopping bleeding, splinting, hypo/hyper therm.

    Give them booboo kit, izzy-d and combat gause, shemagh, and cat-t with basic hands on of at least one application of all the above.
     
  10. Acropolis5

    Acropolis5 Tracker

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    K7: Yes, I can get an hour or so with them and that is part of my plan. Nevertheless, I still want a decent little first-aid-book to add to the pack. It must cover important , but not instantaneously life threatening injuries and remedial action, e.g. how to strap-up a twisted ankle or a broken wrist, etc. Suggestions are solicited.
     
  11. thisjohn

    thisjohn Tracker

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    Herbs to the Rescue by Kurt King, M.H. is excellent
     
  12. Acropolis5

    Acropolis5 Tracker

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    Well, to bring late closure to this thread, I went with the SAS Survival Guide, Collins-Gem mini edition and the AMK, Wilderness & Travel Medicine Comprehansive ( mini ) Guide, by Eric A. Wiess. Both well illustrated and easy to follow for the inexperienced.
     
  13. NJStricker

    NJStricker Guide

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    I hope they never need them.
     
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  14. lopie

    lopie Scout

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  15. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    To build the kit, I've found nothing better than Cody Lundin's "98.6*, the Art of Keeping Your A&& Alive". I made my 16 year old daughter read it, then WE built her kit and went though how to use it.

    For first aid, I really like a NOLS book that Ii think is simply entitled "Wilderness First Aid". One of the things I liked about it was the assumption that the ambulance wasn't coming in 10-15 minutes, but that you were going to be not just 'first aid', but probably 'only aid' for a few hours or days. At the end of each chapter, iirc, there's a summary of what it was about. I've meant to make photocopies of each such page, and then maybe distill it further myself in MS Word into a small booklet, but haven't gotten around to it yet. Unfortunately, I still have 22+ books of books that remain packed after my recent move, and that book is in one of them, so I can't check.
     
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  16. backwoodstrails

    backwoodstrails anatidaephobic Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    As mentioned, Cody's book is very good and pretty funny as well. With technology as it is, a PLB (mentioned above) is a very good thing to have along.

    Follow the rule of 3's and add in communication/signaling (whistle, signal mirror, PLB) as well as navigation and you have it covered.
     
  17. MAD Punty

    MAD Punty Supporter Supporter

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    The SAS survival guide comes in a pocket version, if that is what you are looking for.

    Not sure if these are things you have thought of, already....but a couple of things that should be included....maxi pads or tampons for the wife, some kind of toilet paper. These may not be life or death items, but they have a high likelihood of being needed at some point. My wife takes a lot of road trips, and I am always having to replenish hers in her emergency bag. She is always super thankful that they are there when she needs them suddenly.

    Also, some kind of eye protection and bug protection. Eye protection is crucial if walking at night. One small branch into the eye can create a critical situation for no reason. Bug protection is just another one of those things that have a high likelihood of being needed at some point. Not really life or death.

    You probably know this, already, but just putting it on the table for consideration.
     

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