Completing my navigation challenge

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by MommaJ, Jan 17, 2018.

  1. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    So @rsnurkle challenged me on the Member Challenge to these tasks. This is in response to my posting asking for help with map and compass.

    I challenge @MommaJ to an on-trail navigation exercise. No time limit.

    The main requirements:
    1. Find a detailed map for a place that you can easily visit (and like to visit), and has trails/roads that would take you at least 10 minutes to walk along. (Less if your doctor has time/distance limitations, or you want to modify for health reasons.) No restrictions beyond that, can be a state park, local park, or even a street map for some part of your town.
    2. Make sure you have a copy of the map that you are comfortable drawing on with pencils/pens (print the map if electronic, copy the map if it's a print version on special paper or something more expensive than copy sheets).
    3. Before going anywhere, sit down with the map (indoors) and draw (on the map) the route you want to walk, making sure to decide where you want to start and finish (can be the same place).
    4. Still indoors with the map, mentally walk your route and make a list of as many features along your route as you can see on the map. These features should be listed in the order that they will appear on your route.
    5. Consult references about how to read maps to identify as many features as you can, *especially* if you find yourself identifying 3 or fewer features on your route. One of my standard references is: https://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/TopographicMapSymbols/topomapsymbols.pdf (Even if the USGS didn't make your map, reading through all of these feature symbols will give you an idea of what to look for on your map.)
    6. Now, take your list and your map, and go walk your route. While walking your route, A) check off every feature on your list that you did see, and B) make a second list of things you can see on the actual route that you didn't predict seeing ahead of time.
    7. Optional: if you have GPS (either on a phone or a GPS device), turn it on for your walk, and look at it as often as you want, in order to A) to check how far you've walked and B) ask yourself what you should see next, based on where you are now and what your map and list of features tell you should be visible from the blinking red dot given by the GPS. Consider trying the exercise again without the GPS to see the difference.
    This is going to be an ongoing post as I complete the various tasks.
     
  2. mtnoutdoors

    mtnoutdoors Prov 27:17 Supporter

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    Good luck @MommaJ
    Prov 27 : 17
     
  3. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    First thing first I picked up a map from the park which had just the basic trail. Then using the skills I learned last night I used google to pull up a topo map and printed it off. The printed off copy was hard to read so I used the online version for detail information on the route and used the printed version to help with following the various directions (right/left, ahead/behind)

    Today I sat down and wrote down my route in detail So without further ado

    Allaire State Park green loop from the campground

    Campground map

    • From the campground spot 22 I turn right onto the campground road and then turn right onto the green trail. There should be no elevation changes on my right will be the pond and on the left will be the swamp which will be slightly lower in elevation from the path I am walking. The swamp appears to be in the 40' elevation and the trail appears to be in the 60' elevation areas. If I look at my compass I should be going Northish
    • After passing the pond on the right of me I will come across a forest and on the left of me will be more of the lower swampy area
    • This swampy area will transition into the forest that is already on the right of me and at this point the intersects with the beige trail going to the left, green forward trail straight in front of me, and the green return trail to the right of me
    • I will continue walking straight ahead(northish) on the green trail
    • Soon I will have a forest to the left of me and a swamp to the right of me as this is taking place the trail should slightly start to go downhill as the 40' elevation line appears to coincide with the trail where as before the trail appeared to be at the elevation of the campground at 60'
    • As the trail slopes downward I should come upon a small pond on my right and a swamp on my left
    • At this point the trail should level off and there will now be a swamp on both sides of me
    • A gradual right ward curve turns away from the power lines that have been in the distance on my left side since leaving the campground
    • As the power lines go from my left side to behind me the swamp will turn into forest once again the trail will Y off with the beige trail heading to the left and the green trail continuing straight ahead
    • I am going to stay straight on the green trail which will run parallel to the yellow trail if I look at my compass I will be going south is
    • The forest at this point will be to the right of me and the swamp will be to the left of me
    • As the forest to the right of me gradually turns to swamp land there appears to be a small stream going across the trail
    • At this point there is now swamp on both sides of me
    • The trail will again split off with the left heading to the beige trail or bearing right will allow you to continue on the green trail.
    • I will bear to the right and stay on the green trail
    • The trail is completely surrounded by swamp land with gradual curve to the left and the a gradual turn to the right. With this 2nd gradual turn it will bring me close to the small pond
    • After coming up alongside the the small pond I can see a forest ahead of me and the swamp will be behind, to the right, and to the left of me
    • As I walk into the forest the trail will come to another intersection
    • If I was to continue walking straight I would be on the beige trail, if I was to turn right I would away from the campground, if I turn to the left I will head back to the campground
    • I turn left to head back to the campground now heading southish
    • On my left will be forest and to the right will be swamp land
    • The forested area will open up to the large pond on my left and the swamp being on my right.
    • After passing the pond I will come to the campground road at which point I can turn left and head back to spot 22 or continue across the road to continue on the green trail
    • I choose at this point to turn left and head back to camp
     
  4. central joe

    central joe Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Sounds like you did well and are learning young lass. Good for you. joe
     
  5. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Alrighty I went out today and using my notes, the printed topo map, Gaia phone app went off to walk the green trail.


    While walking i did a running commentary of what I saw verse what I wrote and then a final feelings on it all.

    So most likely tomorrow I am going to write out all down and put it in the file box. This was an interesting little challenge and something i am going to continue doing each week add i noticed a lot of areas i need to work on.
    Screenshot_20180121-185219.png

    On of the things I'm trying to figure out is the Gaia app itself and the elevation being in the negatives verse the topo showing the positives.
    Screenshot_20180121-185312.png
     
  6. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Great job completing the challenge! :35: You even got some off-trail action in there towards the end of the walk :)

    I'm super happy to hear you got maps from a couple different locations. I get a little too map-happy sometimes during trip preparation, but there's a lot of slightly different information out there that's interesting to look at when you're trying to plan a route in a place you can't see (or haven't been to before). An additional source for maps is caltopo.com . In the upper right corner you can adjust what "layers" are shown and look at the nice collection of map layers that are available via caltopo, and then adjust how much of the terrain you want to print to make custom maps.

    :dblthumb: for GaiaGPS, that's my personal favorite. I often use the app to track my routes for later review (have a full battery, turn it on, and let it run while you walk using the map and compass) and also to doublecheck where I think I am from time to time (just like you did on your walk, nice job working to keep yourself oriented throughout the hike).

    Two other things I've used the app for are to mark points of interest (e.g., a local garlic mustard patch in the woods I'm planning to visit in the spring) and also do my pace count estimation. For my pace count estimation, I picked a couple locations with different elevations around work and home and just used the app to help me walk 100m while I counted my paces. Presto, pace count!

    Re: telling swamp versus forest: I've had this problem with foliage depictions, too, on almost all maps except for non-orienteering maps. Orienteering maps are really, really detailed and more reliable for that kind of stuff, but glad you got some personal experience on that front (learning what things look obvious on the map but not so much on the ground, and vice versa).

    Also, another :dblthumb: for tackling solo a place you would normally bring Ray along for. Hope you felt good about testing your limits by having directions to help you keep track of where you are.

    When you start to feel good about reading and working with maps, I'm sure you'll be able to get a lot of good advice and ideas for adding in the compass work... and before you know it, you'll get excited about bushwhacking and find yourself filming a hardwoodsman off-trail navigation video! :D
     
  7. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Thank you for this challenge.

    I'm going to check out that other map site this week as I plan my next trip. I've been wanting to take the Brisbane trail at Allaire but could never find the trail head. It's appears that I did find the trail head yesterday down the road from the campground.

    In an attempt to find some orienteering maps, based on internet info i went to the county park and was told that the orienteering courses have been removed from the park years ago due to non use.

    So local close to home courses are pretty much a option.

    I'm going to continue to update this thread until I make it to the hardwoodsman navigation trial.
     
  8. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Today i was suppose to be at an expo but Pop had a bad sundowner night. By the time I was able to sleep was the time we were going to hit the road. Not to mentioned I wanted to stay local in case it continued that way once he woke up in the afternoon. So Ray and I went for a hike that I have had mapped out and written out.
    This time I added a new dimension to it North,South,East,and West which I used the map and compass to figure out before leaving.

    I was almost spot on the entire time. With the added challenge plus the elevation differences I realized I really need to work on distance awareness now. How far from point a to point b.
    20180210_102546.jpg 20180210_102621.jpg 20180210_104605.jpg 20180210_110348.jpg 20180210_113403.jpg Screenshot_20180210-210410.png Screenshot_20180210-210437.png
     
  9. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Sorry to hear about the rough night for you and Pop, but glad you had a back up activity to get outside.

    Great job stepping things up with the skills used on this outing. It becomes easier to figure out what you need to learn next when you get started, eh?
     
  10. Swampdog

    Swampdog Supporter Supporter

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    Really good job @MommaJ ! It's too bad they got rid of the orienteering courses...

    Question: Do you have any geocaching areas near where you live?
     
  11. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Nice work on improving your skills.

    Thank you for taking care of Pop. Caregiving is a difficult task, good that he has loved ones who care. :)
     
  12. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I honestly do not know if they do but I do not have a GPS to input the coordinates into.

    Thank you. Some days it's difficult other days in nearly impossible. So going on and focusing totally onto a new skill really helps to recharge

    Oh man is it easier to figure out what I need to learn once I actually get out there and start with the basics. Its funny that it never dawned on me till now. Thank you for helping me with taking that 1st step.
     
  13. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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    I don't believe that following the arrow of a GPS to a geocache does much to improve actual real navigation skills by using map, compass and development of observational ability by terrain association. if you want to really learn how to wildlands navigate, you have to get out there and actually navigate with concerted thought about how to do it.
     
  14. Swampdog

    Swampdog Supporter Supporter

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    I agree with you, @Yknpdl.

    I'm thinking along the lines that @MommaJ can get the geocache coordinates, mark the spot on her map, and then use her map and compass skills to find the geocache location.
     
  15. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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    Good plan for initially developing the skills of plotting as well. I recommend getting into UTM mode at some point as a far easier and more precise and lesss confusing method than lat/long
     
  16. Swampdog

    Swampdog Supporter Supporter

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    Agreed, there is a website that @MommaJ can go to and convert Lat/Long into UTM, and then she can pinpoint the location on her topo map.

    One site is: www.earthpoint.us/Convert.aspx
     
  17. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Talking Latin here guys can you translate into human talk lol
     
  18. Swampdog

    Swampdog Supporter Supporter

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    If you can get a copy of the book : WILDERNESS NAVIGATION / Finding your way using map, compass, altimeter & GPS by Bob and Mike Burns.

    It has a lot of good information on the subjects.

    Or, go to YouTube and watch the videos on map reading and land navigation; it's a lot of information that can be easily translated by a good instructor.
     
  19. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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    I don't do geocaching so I can't help you there. It doesn't do anything for me as far as navigation skill or practice is concerned. I am sure someone else here can do that for you.
    I assume you know about latitude and longitude as a method for defining the geographic coordinate of any spot on earth. Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) is simply a different method, originally developed by the military. Look at any recently printed topographic map. Such as:
    https://caltopo.com/map.html#ll=44.36588,-73.90265&z=15&b=t

    It will probably have a series square grid lines printed on it at one km intervals. These perfect km grid squares measure UTM coordinates. It is a metric base-10 system, unlike Lat/long which is a base-60 system requiring complex spherical trigonometry math to calculate angles and distances. Once you learn how to use UTM it is far easier to plot or retrieve point coordinates on a map. Most GPS units will allow you to work in either system, and to convert from one set of coordinates to the other with a simple button configuration selection change.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018
  20. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Ok gotcha. I also thought utm was computer code to tell the GPS where to go. I never realized it was a different form of lat/long.
     
  21. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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    Next, ask me about choice of datum and what that means. It applies to both lat/long and UTM systems.
     
  22. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Lol over here. I think I am going to stick with Lat/Long for a long long time. I'm also thinking I am finally using math I refused to learn in high school
     
  23. Swampdog

    Swampdog Supporter Supporter

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    UTM is more accurate and easier to use than Lat/Long, once you understand it.

    Just like high school math, once you understand it, a light will click on and you'll "get it!"
     
  24. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    That light never clicked in high school lol
     
  25. Swampdog

    Swampdog Supporter Supporter

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    I thoroughly understand where you're coming from... but UTM is easier to learn than high school algebra and geometry.

    Don't get overwhelmed by all this information, just take it a little bit at a time and you will figure it all out. Good luck!
     
  26. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Thanks. I'm just storing the info for now in the very back recesses of my head. Eventually it will make its way forward but for now I'm happy with it being all the way in the very back corner
     
  27. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Ok so I am planning my next adventure at Shark River Park. I have a trail map from the park that list the trail and the swamp areas no elevation or terrain info besides that. So I pulled up the topo map for the area but it is unprocessed and from 1989 I think. The topo has elevation but no terrain info.

    I want to stay on trail but am having a hard time putting the pieces together.

    Besides nat geo are there other topo map places that might have a more detailed view?
    How do you deal with unprocessed topo maps.
     
  28. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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  29. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Going to bookmark caltopo. From what I can tell is nat geo processes some to break them down further and others they haven't. So Shark River is unprocessed according to them.

    Caltopo has the same map but a little bit clearer than nat geo
     
  30. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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    to break them down further still does not tell me anything about what you mean. Do you have an example?
     
  31. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I think I got myself turned around

    With nat geo you can choose a quad that is broken down into quarters like this area
    http://pdf.quad.download.s3.amazonaws.com/39074h4.pdf

    you can click on 3 to see the 3rd quarter and can tell terrain details like at 44 27 000 mN is swamp land

    but when you pull up the quad for shark river
    this is what you get
    http://pdf.quad.download.s3.amazonaws.com/40074b1.pdf

    and it can not be broken down into quarters and you can not tell where the swamp area is
     
  32. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    @Yknpdlr , I was a bit confused by this too, but from what I understand now "processed" and "unprocessed" looks like a term that the NatGeo PDF Quad website came up with. "Unprocessed" refers to the standard 7.5' USGS quads, whereas "processed" quads are broken down further into four 8.5x11" sized segments. Here's the link to an example nearby: http://pdf.quad.download.s3.amazonaws.com/40074b2.pdf

    @MommaJ , caltopo has been my easiest bet for custom 8.5x11 sized maps in nearly any area. However, you may also be able to get some satisfactory 2015/2016 dated USGS maps and print specific portions of them. Look at the "Print posters and banners" entry in this page, and the "Print a portion of a page" instructions further down: https://helpx.adobe.com/acrobat/using/basic-pdf-printing-tasks.html (Those instructions are for Adobe Reader or Adobe Acrobat, if either of those pieces of software are already on your computer, but many other PDF readers also have printing capabilities in this way.)

    If you know anyone who does graphic design, I've been using Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Acrobat to pull out custom chunks of USGS maps and resize them as needed. But all of that is using skills I picked up years ago for general graphic design work. The cleanest custom maps are from GIS software, so if you know anyone who uses that (professionally or for fun, like orienteering), figuring out how to bribe/compensate them for a custom topo map of your favorite place(s) might be worthwhile.
     
  33. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I just played around with caltopo( back on the laptop) and was able to print to pdf and then print that off and it looked a lot more of what I like about the broken down sections on nat geo. with the scale, delineation and such on it. Just missing the terrain features(swamp,forest,sand ect) but I am starting to think that might be due to some state parks adding them and others not having them available.
     
  34. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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    One of the many advantages of learning to use Caltopo:
    When you select the print menu in Caltopo, you can define a pdf map centered to any region and size you want. You will not get more detail than on the original 1:24k map, but you can scale (zoom) it to any size you like, also with any scale of UTM grid lines.
     
  35. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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    All of the online map sources use data directly from original taxpayer payed USGS maps. Some, such as Mytopo.com try to add extra features that they will charge you for. But all input information and map data come from the same place.
     
  36. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I attempted a major challenge yesterday into today. First I used caltopo to set up a map,then I plotted a course with each point ending at a road where Ray will meet me. Then I figured out the bearings.

    Today Ray and headed out to check that the roads were accessible and to get a view of the land.

    Unfortunately the swamps were more like cranberry bogs,the streams were rivers, the ponds were lakes,and we could not safely drive the truck to the end of the roads.

    On the plus side we walked. 5mile to spot A and I sighted in the direction of travel with my compass but I am unable to walk across the swamp aka a cranberry bog. And at spot B is a perfect lake to launch the kayak from. C is a non accessible fire road as well. lol

    20180215_214803.jpg
     
  37. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Great challenge setup for yourself! Your skills are moving right along--it's a lot of fun to watch your progress. Hope the water recedes enough for you to attempt it, although with spring around the corner, that might take a bit of time. Two questions:

    1) Have you worked on methods for tracking your distance? I ask because, over distances longest than half a mile off trail, if you don't trail distance to keep yourself patient, you might start to think "shouldn't I be there yet?" and start to doubt your bearing--even if the bearing is perfect.
    2) Did you see the "aiming off" example I gave in my HW submission? I think that's a technique that might be helpful to consider. Hitting the exact ends of those roads would be fantastic navigation and isn't impossible, but if they're old fire roads (hard to see, washed out, etc.) it might be easy to miss them if you get just a little bit off your bearing. Aiming off is specifically intended for hedging your bets in these kinds of circumstances.
     
    CivilizationDropout and MommaJ like this.
  38. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    1. I have not yet worked out a method for distance. What I did do was take my trail time and double it for off trail time. The plan was to then take that estimate and use the time for the 2nd leg of the trip. So I gave myself 42 min(6mins per 10th of a mile) to go from a to b. If that time was drastically off I would have a better judge from b to c which is the same distance.

    2. Aiming off. The reason I picked these 3 points is that from a to b I would be walking between 2 streams. If I crossed a stream I would know I was definitely heading the wrong way. (am I understand aiming off correctly?)

    From b to c I would have to cross 2 streams but I did not have any do not cross markers set up

    What I find was that the roads are old sand fire roads and for the most part very cleared of tree growth. Just not stable enough to attempt without 4wd.

    Currently I am looking for a new location with set checkpoints where I can check in with Ray that are under a mile from each other.
     
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  39. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    This sounds good, but also don't be concerned if your pace slows to half a mile per hour (versus half a mile per 30 minutes) when moving off-trail. That's the speed I've commonly heard and it matches with my own experience. And let Ray know you might end up moving slowing than expected (whether because you're trying to pay attention to the bearing, or if the off-trail area has lots of brush/obstacles to move through).

    Here's a good description of aiming off: https://sectionhiker.com/aiming-off-a-compass-navigation-technique/
    Using the two streams as features to keep you on track is great. Looking at your map, I think the most obvious aiming off opportunity would have been moving from C to B, so my earlier suggestion about using this technique may not actually be appropriate. The main issue I see is that your "handrails" that you're moving between "the two streams" don't seem like they'll necessarily be in sight while you are traveling. So, if your bearing is bit off to the south, it looks like it's possible for you to pass just south of point B, but still stay far enough north of the southern stream that you could go for a reasonable distance without realizing that you're traveling semi-parallel to the road and are west of point B. That's also where distance tracking would come in. If you have the GPS tracker active, it will be able to tell you that you've gotten west of point B, but without it, you would have to make a judgment about whether you had gone too far, and could turn north and hit the road, and then backtrack on the road to point B, or whether you hadn't gone far enough and would expect to hit the northern stream if you head north to check. Neither of these things sound like an issue if you're using a free day to wander in the woods, so I think it would be a helpful experience regardless.

    Sounds like a good alternative to super swampy bog and and sketchy sandy roads, but definitely keep this route in your backpocket to check out--definitely looks like a good testing area for navigation skills.
     
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  40. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Ah ha gotcha. So aiming off allows me to catch a linear feature that I can walk to the end destination and "handrails" need/should be a feature I can see verse just being aware of.

    Will let Ray know and will adjust timing to match the .5 miles per hour .
     
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  41. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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    If I find myself in very thick vegetation or climbing over a lot of recent blowdown, or pushing through what rangers call "dog hair spruce", I am not surprised to find my speed dropping to a quarter mph. A wet bogy swamp also qualifies for severely slowing you down. Those who use pace count in such areas may find large errors in pace count as well.
    Usually a handrail is a linear feature ( such as a water course, ravine, or ridge) that you can follow and be constantly aware of, although you don't have to be within visual sight of it 100% of the time. Traveling between broadly spaced handrails are more likely guides that will tell you if you are seriously heading in error.

    Considering your exercise....I would have picked a dryer region with easier walking ground to practice my first navigation legs.
    The first thing to consider from your map is how accurate is it likely to be? What is the date of the last map update? Is it an area that may have been logged or have other roads constructed for the cranberry bogs? Might there be other kinds of construction, buildings, processing facilities or parking lots? Have dams been constructed or taken down to change the character and depth of the wetlands? These are all potential sources of confusion.
    [ I go to an area where the latest USGS update is 1943, where beavers had all been trapped out for many years. Since then beavers have made a huge recovery and now the area is practically unrecognizable versus the map due to numerous new dams and ponds]

    On your map, the next thing you should consider after you have found your magnetic compass azimuth headings is, what are my possible handrails and backstops. If you go on a direct heading and miss your points, how will you know? Heading to point B, it appears that if you miss the road then eventually you will leave the wetlands and reach higher ground. Consider what are your options if that happens.

    If I had to absolutely get to your Point B with a "safe" choice, I might start out with a course heading Northwest to intersect that upper stream, using it as a handrail until I reach the 3-way stream junction as a definitely identifiable check point. Then head straight south to a poin B offset (aiming off point) to the road. Upon reaching the road, simply head east to the end and arrive at point B. Experience in such areas says those kinds of roads may not be accurately depicted on the map, and there are likely other roads not shown that may severely confuse you.

    Upon heading from B to Point C, you have a couple of streams to assist you. I would make intermediate checkpoints at each of the stream junctions (there are 2 of them). From the second one, Success Road is an obvious backstop that you can't miss. Note the distance from B to the first stream is about the same as the distance from the second stream to C. Note the elapsed travel time in the fist case and it should be similar for the second case.

    If you want to get from C back to A, I would recommend heading a little farther east, so that you hit the shore of Success Lake first (possibly by following the stream to it), then follow the lake shore around, initially south until my compass showed the shore bending toward the east. From there take a southerly path to the road and point A
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2018
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  42. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Reading and looking:
    So opening up nat geo topo maps shows that the topo map was last revised in 1981, using caltopo I added roads to it(which is how I ended up picking my end points being roads), you are correct when looking at the full map that if I miss point B by going more left of it I will end up walking almost 2 miles before I hit another road and during that walk the stream branches off twice. If I miss point B by going more to the right of it I will end up going close to 3 miles before I hit a road or lake. Definitely good to add in soft check points in this area( areas to let me know I am still on my bearing and not veering off)

    Choosing this area: I saw the swamp markings and figured it would be more like Allaire woods swamp land which is just wet areas after heavy rainfall but for the most part just clearer than the forested area. With that thinking I figured that it would be easier to walk through with less trees and brambles. So it was a good learning eye opening that a swamp in this area is very different than that area. Looking at the maps today and seeing if there is a way to tell non walk able swamp to walk able swamp land I noticed that this area has a billion more streams and sources of water than Allaire.

    All this information is definitely helping to figure out and map out my next area. I am also thinking about purchasing a suunto M3 compass instead of continuing to use the Brunton Eclipse from @OldMan. Its a great compass but at times it has confused me since its features are different from the features described in the video series that Columbia river orienteering put out on youtube and most teaching sources.
     
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  43. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    My day today so far,more driving around planning based in a new location.

    Many start end spots entered,many start end spots driven too before picking a location
    Screenshot_20180217-135901.png

    Then playing around on the map to figure out the best way to go from A to B.

    The straight shot route is the shortest way to go but no handrail. The plus side us that aim off to the end location is easy.

    The indirect long route has an easy fixable handrail almost the entire trip but summing off would only work at the very end leg.
    20180217_135806.jpg

    After driving the area it is not boggy but there are low briers so walking it now would be easier than in the summer.

    Now to think on it some more and work out the bearings.
     
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  44. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Ok so before doing that long walk I wanted to check my reading bearing and following a bearing in a safe location. So it's a beautiful day today and I gave it a shot.
    20180221_140402.jpg

    Yup very short .3 miles with the river as a handrail with a last updated map from 1989. My end goal was the rectangle shape near the last dot(aimed off).
    Screenshot_20180221-140324.png

    My true path. The path of the river has changed slighty. Unlike what the topo shows I never crossed the river. I did cross 1 stream though that split off from the main river.

    All in all today was a success and a great experience.
     
  45. Quinlan

    Quinlan Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Greetings,

    @MommaJ Thank you for taking up this challenge (thank you also to @rsnurkle for issuing it).

    I have zero knowledge of navigating, orienteering and will study this thread diligently. :)

    Regards,

    Christos

    "Wood you build a knife challenge"
    Project start: 17/02/2018
    Project deadline: 16/02/2019
     
  46. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    This challenge really has helped in making it less scary. A huge hint I learned was the degrees of n,s,e,w so that when making a bearing and following it if I wrote done 90 degrees but was walking west I knew something was way off.
     
  47. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Tracker

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    That's why I tell my students (and myself) to always do a "sanity check" whenever you make a measurement and attempt to apply it to reality. Relative to the map, does it make sense that (for example) an azimuth of 125 degrees should take you in the direction you are actually headed? "Stupid mistakes" are often all too easy to make with sometimes dire consequences, but are easy to catch and correct with a little second thought.
     

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