Containers from Natural Materials - Post Yours (Baskets, Bags, Sheaths etc..)

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by NWPrimate, Aug 10, 2017.

  1. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,059
    Likes Received:
    63,904
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    I'm hoping that this thread can serve a similar function to threads like Friction Fire Tuesday, Flint & Steel Friday, Post Your Natural Cordage, etc...

    As I always mention, I really like these ongoing threads that encourage practice and give people a chance to share their projects, ask questions, and get inspired.

    I have recently become interested in making containers from natural materials and I know some of you like @OrienM are already amazing at it. I'm at the very beginning of the learning stages, so I'll be posting projects here in the future and I hope you'll join me.

    Some of you have some amazing projects from the past, so please feel free to re-post old photos here for inspiration.

    We can keep the criteria pretty loose. If you can reasonably call it a container and you made it out of natural materials; post it up!

    Baskets, bags, boxes, bottles, cups, sheaths, pouches and anything else that I'm forgetting are all welcome. The only limitation I would like to impose is that what you post should be made from materials that you collected in nature. For example, we already have other threads for leather work, but if you harvested it from an animal yourself, then that definitely qualifies.

    I'm looking forward to seeing your posts!
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2017
  2. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,059
    Likes Received:
    63,904
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    Getting the ball rolling... (feel free to laugh) ;)

    As I mentioned, I'm brand new to this and only made my first natural materials container last month. For that project I adapted a technique usually used with cedar bark to make this little maple bark foraging basket.

    [​IMG]

    This same design was used as a canoe bailer by the indigenous people of the Northwest so it is supposed to be water tight, but I wasn't careful enough and cracked mine. It still worked fine for berries though.

    Today I figured I'd take my first crack at a proper woven basket. This was a spur of the moment idea, and I haven't studied any particular techniques yet, so I was just kind of winging it based on the limited amount of info that I've seen in the past.

    I started with some maple bark strips lashed in a star pattern, and a piece of maple bent into a ring for the top.

    [​IMG]

    I fiddled with it for a while, trying different ways of attaching the supports and eventually came upon a design that seemed to be working. I was really happy with how it was coming out at this point. I made one of the supports too long which made the frame lop-sided, but it was good enough for a first attempt.

    [​IMG]

    Not knowing what I was doing, I just kind of started feeding strands of bark through the supports. That led to lots of gaps in between, so I started doubling back and looping over trying to keep things tight. Still learning, I tried different ways of attaching, looping, tying, and twisting to get things to lay right.

    This resulted in total chaos.

    [​IMG]

    When I started the project, my idea was to see if I could make a basket in under and hour. :18:

    Three hours later, I ran out of time and material and was left with this ugly unfinished bark tangle.

    [​IMG]

    This was a good learning experience. It took way longer than expected and didn't come out looking like I envisioned, but I've got my foot in the door now and am more interested in developing this skill than I was yesterday.

    Obviously I have long way to go, and I'm sure it will be helpful for me to learn some actual techniques instead of just winging it, but sometimes it's fun just to dive right in.

    Despite being ugly, it feels really strong, so I will finish it at some point.
     
  3. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,897
    Likes Received:
    11,163
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    Great thread idea!
     
  4. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    7,631
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    Great idea for a thread @NWPrimate...as most of y'all know I'm a bit of a basket nut. I will go dig up a few pics of my baskets and bags to post :dblthumb:.

    I like your baskets, too! A very respectable first weaving effort there...I call that particular style "free weave", and there are some really elegant Japanese baskets woven that way. A suggestion, you might try adding the rim last next time...you'll probably have an easier time weaving with the ribs free.

    PS, it takes me about two hours to make a pretty rough little yucca basket, going as fast as I can. Finishing one in an hour would be most impressive for anybody, especially a newbie. Slow down, take your time. Basketry is not a fast craft in general.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2017
  5. CivilizationDropout

    CivilizationDropout -MOA #17- Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    47,952
    Location:
    The Swamp
    Well, I'm guessing my store bought sissel and jute "basket bag" I'm working on won't count. I just so happen to have some birch kicking around if @Bitterroot Native doesnt mind me dipping into his supply! :D

    See you fellers later..
     
  6. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    7,631
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    Nope, bags are containers too...post it up! It's a really cool bag...have you gotten pretty far on the sides by now?
     
  7. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,059
    Likes Received:
    63,904
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    Thanks @OrienM . It's been fun playing around with it so far. I enjoy being at the complete beginner stage of a new skill. It's exciting when there is so much that you don't know and you learn a lot with each practice session.

    It's great to hear that "free weave" is an actual technique. I think mine might have been a little too free. :18:



    Thank you for the suggestions! I will put them to good use and welcome any others if you have time to comment on future projects. I've seen what you can do and I know there's a lot I can learn from you.
     
  8. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    7,631
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    I'm still struggling with photos held hostage by photobucket :mad: but do have a couple pics 0f my baskets handy to show.

    My pack basket, split bamboo woven in a hexagonal pattern, with some added parts made of yucca leaves. The braided straps, unfortunately, didn't survive long; they've now been replaced with cotton webbing. This turned out to be really comfy pack, both light and tough, and I still use it daily.

    DSCI0066.JPG

    Another pack, this one more of a textile bag, made of looped cordage. Yucca, with stripes of dogbane. Except for the straps, this is one continuous piece of cordage, probably 150-200'.

    DSCN1505.JPG

    I started trying to make baskets about 15 years ago...I actually still have my very first basket around somewhere, a back quiver in willow. It is loose and wobbly and looks horrible, but held up amazingly well over the years! I've been real impressed with the utilitarian qualities of baskets, and of course admired their beauty and the fascinating diversity of traditional patterns. Our ancestors were awfully clever folks to invent this stuff...;)

    So, bring on the baskets and containers! :)
     
  9. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    7,631
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    You're more than welcome, and I'm happy to help. If you have any more Q's just ask. I'm not sure you can be too free, lol :D
     
  10. CivilizationDropout

    CivilizationDropout -MOA #17- Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    47,952
    Location:
    The Swamp
    Nope. I've been occupied by my latest project, I'm typing this one handed while I try to rock her to sleep....

    I'll put this in here for now and come back when I get some more progress; "Rope Basket" Bag; Build Along.

    I'll be watching this one..
     
  11. OMRebel

    OMRebel He who piddles Supporter Hardwoodsman Bushclass I Bushclass II

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2016
    Messages:
    1,608
    Likes Received:
    9,850
    Not gonna laugh, cause knowing you, in about a month you'll be pushing some awesome stuff. First ones are not too shabby either!
     
  12. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2014
    Messages:
    2,838
    Likes Received:
    7,756
    Location:
    South Bend, IN
    i haven't woven a basket since i was in scouts! that was um.... how long ago now... lol :)

    great job on the baskets @OrienM those look awesome!
     
  13. WhisperInThePine

    WhisperInThePine Wubba lubba dub dub Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 28, 2013
    Messages:
    2,392
    Likes Received:
    4,882
    Location:
    Colorado
    Can't wait to see where this goes!
     
  14. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,897
    Likes Received:
    11,163
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    This isn't my work, but I thought folks in this thread would appreciate this video of over the fire cooking with a spruce bark container (complete with handle and lid!):


    I think the video is a great demonstration of a method to deal with the problem of boiling water and cooking food without a metal cooking container. I had previously assumed that most natural containers would require the "drop hot rocks in it!" method to heat their contents, but this has clearly changed my mind. I didn't catch if the maker of the video explained the details of the method (how thick/thin the bark needs to be to be protected by the liquid in the container) but I may follow up on the book he referenced to see if there are more notes there.

    Lonnie from Far North Bushcraft and Survival also demonstrates this technique with a birch bark container boiling water over coals (now that I know to search for it, seeing a lot of videos on this technique).
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2017
  15. Pastor Chris

    Pastor Chris Keeper of the T.Darrah Tenkara Pass-Around Hobbyist Supporter Bushcraft Friend Hardwoodsman Bushclass II

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2013
    Messages:
    13,120
    Likes Received:
    41,234
    Location:
    Chester, NJ
    Great idea for a thread!

    This is a pack basket Jake and I made for his FR Summit Exp.

    We had grabbed a damaged split ash laundry basket from a flea market, took it apart, and re-used the splits to make this. The only thing we added were the straps, and some jute twine for binding the top.

    [​IMG]IMG_1378 by Chris Scrivens, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1379 by Chris Scrivens, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1380 by Chris Scrivens, on Flickr
     
  16. Pastor Chris

    Pastor Chris Keeper of the T.Darrah Tenkara Pass-Around Hobbyist Supporter Bushcraft Friend Hardwoodsman Bushclass II

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2013
    Messages:
    13,120
    Likes Received:
    41,234
    Location:
    Chester, NJ
    And a birch bark 32oz water bottle I made with only bark and jute twine. I'm especially proud of this effort. Completely watertight and guaranteed for life never to break LOL.

    [​IMG]Untitled by Chris Scrivens, on Flickr
     
  17. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    7,631
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    You, sir, are a master craftsman...:rolleyes:

    (Seriously, great job on the pack basket! :dblthumb:)
     
  18. Finner

    Finner Banned Member Banned

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2016
    Messages:
    796
    Likes Received:
    4,772
    Location:
    New Brunswick, Canada
    An oldie but a fun one. Birch bark, red dogwood and sinew

    BB container.jpg
     
  19. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,059
    Likes Received:
    63,904
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    That was cool @rsnurkle ! It does make sense that if a paper cup can handle the flames, then bark would as well.

    As soon as I saw this book, I immediately recognized it as one that I had in my collection as a kid.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I just ordered another copy. :)

    Awesome job @Pastor Chris !


    That's beautiful @Finner !
     
  20. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,897
    Likes Received:
    11,163
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    Excellent! :4:

    When I started reading this I thought you were going to post about your wooden water bottle project, but I see you've moved past carved wood to unbreakable birch bark! :18:
     
  21. CivilizationDropout

    CivilizationDropout -MOA #17- Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    47,952
    Location:
    The Swamp
    So I've got a project in the doldrums, my rope basket build. How did you knot that bag? I'm kind of set on using this one strand the whole height of the bag.
     
  22. RangerWeaver

    RangerWeaver Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2016
    Messages:
    312
    Likes Received:
    1,535
    Location:
    Tarpon Springs, Florida
    Stop giving me ideas for a new project!
     
  23. bacpacjac

    bacpacjac Guide Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2013
    Messages:
    3,724
    Likes Received:
    24,448
    Location:
    Southern Ontario, Canada
    Cool thread idea and cool projects, everyone. I'm eyeing my pile of birch bark as I read, tnking maybe I could give @Pastor Chris's water bottle a try.... ;)
     
  24. field-expedient

    field-expedient Misfit Supporter Bushclass II

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    2,891
    Likes Received:
    14,243
  25. CivilizationDropout

    CivilizationDropout -MOA #17- Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    47,952
    Location:
    The Swamp
    Well THAT photo is familiar... :D

    I've got a project to work on..
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2017
  26. thereandbackagain

    thereandbackagain Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2017
    Messages:
    297
    Likes Received:
    1,132
    We lived in Apache country when I was a little boy. Our car was a PINK Chrysler stationwagon with a hemi engine. We were out one morning when the fan belt snapped and no spare. Desert dwellers quickly learn rubber and batteries have shorter lifespans in heat. Apache cowboy rides up from a small cattleherd. He cut some yucca and wove a fan belt. We drove back to the local gas station at a safe and sane 35 MPH and the attendant had to cut it off.
    California people made the finest baskets in the world with many in private collections and French and German Museums. I worked one summer curating The Southwest Museum's cowboy tack collection and enjoyed what was then one of the finest basketry collections. There were a few so tiny they were displayed under a magnifying glass up to fragments of one big enough for a two person hottub-which it was. Idiots at the Gene Autry museum gained control and closed the museum down :12: Hollywierds' 'Winning the West' mythology hasn't changed much really for all their PC posturing:55:
     
  27. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    7,631
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    I knew yucca fiber was crazy strong (I've lifted myself off the ground on a 1/4" thick cord) but a fan belt! Wow.

    So, I just noticed I left @CivilizationDropout hanging for like two months on his question about looping (sorry, man! :(). Hope you got it figured out, and I didn't hold your whole project up. In case you didn't: they are half hitches. Each stitch is just a half hitch knot, the loose end goes through a loop on the row below, then through the loop you just made. Adjust the size of the loop, and repeat...endlessly ;) . I eye-splice the loose end back into the cord at the top of the bag to finish up.

    Other repeated knots will also work; if you google "knotless netting" you can find images of a bunch of options.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2017
  28. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,897
    Likes Received:
    11,163
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    And improvised, working fanbelt is an awesome story @thereandbackagain ! That Museum sounds like a great place in its prime. I got to see some pretty awesome baskets by people from the Pacific Northwest recently. These two didn't need magnifying glasses, but were still impressively tiny for the amount of weaving involved
    [​IMG]
    The blur in the foreground is my thumb and thumbnail on the glass a few inches away, for reference.
     
  29. thereandbackagain

    thereandbackagain Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2017
    Messages:
    297
    Likes Received:
    1,132
    You can also make a soap from yucca roots. the petals are delicious when new in salads and the stalks can be boiled into a kind of sweet potato consistency looking very grey and tasting something like ELMERS GLUE. The tips on the leaves make decent needles. They used to blanket the local hillsides before the drought and development reduced their numbers.
     
  30. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2017
    Messages:
    3,545
    Likes Received:
    27,109
    Alrighty 1st time weaving a basket since 1998 thanks to getting a gift starter kit from my daughter
    20171225_184140.jpg 20171225_184942.jpg 20171225_190036.jpg 20171225_193655.jpg 20171225_201344.jpg 20171225_203206.jpg 20171225_204215.jpg 20171225_204254.jpg
     
  31. CivilizationDropout

    CivilizationDropout -MOA #17- Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    47,952
    Location:
    The Swamp
  32. CivilizationDropout

    CivilizationDropout -MOA #17- Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    47,952
    Location:
    The Swamp
    Thank you, I'm trying to figure out my next stage, the current design is taking WAY TO LONG with the minimal time I've been able to throw at it.
     
  33. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2017
    Messages:
    3,545
    Likes Received:
    27,109
    Thanks she got the kit from basketweaving.com it comes with instructions and materials for I think 3 baskets
     
  34. CivilizationDropout

    CivilizationDropout -MOA #17- Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    47,952
    Location:
    The Swamp
    That's who I used for the pack basket build and Natalie's little basket.

    They where good for me, I'm planning on making more eventually.
     
  35. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    7,631
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    Very nice, MommaJ!
     
  36. 66drifter

    66drifter Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,517
    Likes Received:
    3,991
    Location:
    between Ft Worth & the RED RIVER
    MommaJ, might i ask where you get those ONG splits pease

    i have another project in mind which would be really cool made out of nice splits like that

    btw, NICE BASKET!

    THANKS
     
  37. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2017
    Messages:
    3,545
    Likes Received:
    27,109
    ONG splits?
     
  38. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    7,631
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    http://basketweaving.com/basket-weaving-reed-and-cane/

    Lots of sizes of rattan reed; they also have ash splits.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2017
  39. 66drifter

    66drifter Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,517
    Likes Received:
    3,991
    Location:
    between Ft Worth & the RED RIVER
    "L" ONG (LONG)

    OOPS ;-)

    a cup of coffee over my keyboard has made a few keys behave poorly and the "L" is one of them

    i want to make mast hoops for attaching sails to the mast in a way thay can freely slide up n down the mast

    it would be handy to have 1"± pieces about 6'+ long if i can find them

    sorry to the OP if this borders on hyjack
     
  40. MommaJ

    MommaJ Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2017
    Messages:
    3,545
    Likes Received:
    27,109
    Ah ha ok makes sense now. Yeah it looks like on the website they sell 1" x 80 ft sections of flat reeds
     
  41. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,059
    Likes Received:
    63,904
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    Big leaf maple bark boiling vessel.

    [​IMG]

    I initially intended to pinch the stripped ends and make a canoe bailer design, but on my first attempt that day, I ended up cracking it in several places; so I approached it a bit differently in hopes of avoiding the same result.

    [​IMG]

    With the first attempt, I soaked the entire sheet in the water before starting to work with it; with the intention of softening the bark and making it more flexible.

    However, in the process the outer bark absorbed water too, which made it much more difficult to remove. This time carefully scored and folded the sheet to crack the outer bark, and used a knife to remove it rather than peeling it away by hand. Once that was removed, I put it into the creek to soften.

    [​IMG]

    Instead of pinching the ends together, I used the method that @rsnurkle shared in the video above; making clothespins to secure folded corners. It didn't come out perfect, but much to my delight, it held water this time!

    [​IMG]

    Dropping hot rocks from the fire boiled the water very quickly. It was probably only a minute between the first rock hitting the surface achieving a rolling boil.

    [​IMG]

    That worked so well that it almost felt like cheating, so I tried using the same container to boil directly on the coals. I set it up on the rocks that I used for boiling the first time to lift it up far enough that I could push new coals underneath. This took a lot longer and a lot more babying. It took almost thirty minutes to get a good simmer going. I never got the comforting big bubbles that came with stone boiling, but it did simmer long enough that I was comfortable that any harmful organisms would be killed. Someone pointed out that I could have sped up the process with a rudimentary lid, so I will try to keep that in mind next time.

    [​IMG]

    Besides taking longer, it obviously put a lot more wear and tear on the container and leaked more of the tannins from the bark into the water. The first batch that was stone boiled had a mild maple flavor to it and was relatively clear, but this one got a lot darker and had a stronger taste. Stone boiling is the clear winner here, but it is good to know that this material and design can withstand the heat long enough to boil at least one batch.
     
  42. CivilizationDropout

    CivilizationDropout -MOA #17- Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    47,952
    Location:
    The Swamp
    Impressive!
     
    NevadaBlue, NWPrimate and rsnurkle like this.
  43. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,059
    Likes Received:
    63,904
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    Still working on it buddy. ;)

    [​IMG]

    (previous failed attempts without the knife inspired by @CivilizationDropout )
     
  44. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,897
    Likes Received:
    11,163
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    Woohoo! Loved seeing this come to life, since I have been thinking about this process and wishing for more information on it--how convenient for my armchair self that you got outside and shared your experience with us :)

    This is a great note about the construction process: the different properties of inner versus outer bark, wet and dry. It's not something I would have initially thought to pay much attention to. I went back into my notes and found a video focusing on making the bark pot from Bushcraft Bear's goulash video above, and he takes the time to remove all of the outer bark before wetting, folding, and cooking with the container.


    I wonder if removing the outer bark fully (not just on the sections to be folded) also helps with the heat transfer? Probably not up to rock-boiling speed, though.

    How did you like the folding and clothespin method you settled on in this case?

    Obviously pinched corners lead to holes in this material, but you've successfully used pinching with other materials, so I'm curious if you have any thoughts about that generally yet. I've been planning to play with this style of attaching the corners with bark:

    I've used it with non-bark materials with varying success. I test ran a printer paper and chopsticks container while in my office, and then tried that folding and pinning method again outside with paper from a bagel sandwich. The thin paper unfortunately revealed that the sturdyness of the material is very important: this material had a slit/slow leak in the bottom anyway, but the first issue I ran into was the flexible sides sagging so low that water spilled out as soon as I poured it in. I think this would be less of a problem with most barks, since the size of tree needed to get a reasonable size sheet for the container probably has a thick enough inner bark layer to be sturdier than the paper my bagel was wrapped in.

    That is a big difference in terms of speed and looks like an equally big difference in taste. I had been most curious about bark over coals as a method to get away from potential dirt and ash from putting the rocks in, but if the food is going to be bark-flavored (even with a lid to protect from ash), there may be a very good reason why rock boiling is the primitive method that shows up the most in history books.

    On another note, you might find this interesting. I found a paper where the researchers test ran the efficiency of early maple sugaring techniques, such as boiling the sap in birch bark trays: https://ethnobiology.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/JoE/5-1/HolmanEgan1985.pdf

    I might be one of the few people on the planet to find humor in academic papers, but I thought there were some funny comments that hold useful lessons for anyone trying to make and use birch bark trays for boiling:
    At the moment, I don't remember what they said (or didn't say) about lids and protecting the maple syrup/sap from ash from the fire.
     
  45. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,059
    Likes Received:
    63,904
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    Thanks @rsnurkle. :)

    I went out with the idea that I was going to make the cedar canoe bailer design which incorporated leaving the outer bark intact on the bottom so removing it all didn't even occur to me at the time, despite having seen that video.

    It does look it does look like stripping it completely would be worth experimenting with. It might help with the heat transfer you mentioned, but I don’t think I’ll bother with putting bark directly on the fire again after seeing how well the rocks worked.

    The advantage that I see there is the potential for having more flexibility over-all, which could help make it easier to fold without cracking.

    It seemed simple and ended up being totally functional, so I don’t see any problem with using it, especially if you bind the clips to keep them from splitting out all the way.

    I do want to keep trying with the pinched ends, because I think that it has the potential to result in a sturdier container and provides an easy way to include a handle. If I can get good at making one design of container that could function both as a basket and a cooking device, that would be ideal.

    I’m not sure how that will end up playing out, but the thought of time spent practicing a skill having multiple practical applications definitely appeals to my nature.

    I did something very similar a few months ago to get an idea of how I might fold it, but never tried putting water into it.


    :18: You’re not alone.
     
  46. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    7,631
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    Recently finished up this loop-netted backpack, made from yucca cordage:

    SUNP0119.JPG bag2.jpg
     
  47. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2015
    Messages:
    8,059
    Likes Received:
    63,904
    Location:
    The Wet Side of WA
    Seriously impressive work! :35:
     
  48. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    7,631
    Location:
    Gila, NM
    Thanks, it was a big job! There's almost 500' of cord in that thing; I irritated my right thumb pretty badly with all the reverse-twisting, and it hurt for days afterwards (worth it, though...:dblthumb:). I really need to learn the leg-rolling technique for stuff like this.
     
  49. CivilizationDropout

    CivilizationDropout -MOA #17- Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    47,952
    Location:
    The Swamp
    I was just thinking about your cordage rampages. What do you think of knotweed to make a similar style bag?
     
  50. CivilizationDropout

    CivilizationDropout -MOA #17- Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    8,505
    Likes Received:
    47,952
    Location:
    The Swamp
    @Luchtaine. Post up bud.
     

Share This Page