Could you actually survive and how?

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Gary V, Sep 28, 2018.

  1. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    You know the basics; food (water), clothing and shelter. In the event of a complete loss of utilities could you survive long term with your existing preps? This probably has been discussed up, down and sideways already but humor the new guys please. :)

    For city dwellers water must be a big concern, especially if you live in an arid environment. How will you cope if city water is shut off?

    Assuming you already have shelter food is next on the list. Cases of MREs aren't good for the long term. I've read that they don't recommend eating them for more then a few weeks or you can develop digestive issues. Meat is a tough prep to keep. Do you have canned meats in your preps?

    I'm just curious what you all consider a good cache for the long term. I'm not very well prepared in this regard. I have live animals for eggs and meat but those could be stolen easily. I'm looking for some good advice. Got any?
     
  2. Paulyseggs

    Paulyseggs Supporter Supporter

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    Personally i look for foods with the most versatility .

    Basic staples.

    Then see if i can get it in cans .

    Wheat
    Oats
    Potato flakes
    Powdered eggs
    Peanut butter
    Oily fish. Mackerel salmon .
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2018
  3. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    We have about 150 gallons of water on hand and two natural sources a few blocks away (in opposite directions.) Fuel to boil water, but also filters and bleach for 100,000s of gallons.

    We have food enough for two months regular eating and another three months on a less varied diet. We also have two weeks of Mtn. House meals.

    We do have canned meats. Keystone brand beef, pork, and chicken. We also have tuna, but not as much.

    We have eggs frozen. We bought silicone ice cube trays that have large cubes. Each section holds about one egg. I take a dozen and crack them into a bowl, then scramble them up. Then I fill each cube and freeze them. Then I just pop them out and put them in a gallon zip-lock bag & put them in the chest freezer.
     
  4. Paulyseggs

    Paulyseggs Supporter Supporter

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    Walmart.com has a good selection on canned prep foods .
     
  5. Guillaume Longval

    Guillaume Longval Friction Fire Addict

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    haha.

    im more in the nomadic prep (if i could call it prep). i like to think that i would be a valuable addition to any group with my crafting skills (woodwork and forge). i wouldnt like to make a cache and be forced to go there for survival...i do have a significant amount of mason jars and a good charcoal water filter, but thats for the occasionnal ice storm or whatever.
     
  6. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    @Guillaume Longval Is that instrument on your profile pic made of zebra wood? Also wondering what that's about - why you have it there.
     
  7. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Lots of wet canned meat, kept indoors of course. Lots of dry canned meat, in the outside storage containers. Those keep everything that freezing won’t hurt. Grains, beans, sugar, paper products, pasta, wheat grinder, etc. Be sure to store spices and spice mixes like taco seasoning packages. Those make the every day rice and beans turn into different meals.
    Dried vegetables, fruits too.
    Variety, and, most importantly, things you EAT. I can’t imagine it and it would not happen to me (I eat anything and everything, not picky) but apparently people will starve while looking at bags of wheat, when they are used to eating rice! Sigh...

    Hard candy.
    Bubble gum.

    A lot of my storage is hand packed by me. Look at the hulled, whole corn in bags at walmart, sold as feed. 100% corn, no additives. That stores well and can be ground into corn meal and flour or cooked into stews and other hot meals.

    Any prescription medications, as far out as you can manage. At one time I had a year supply of mine. I no longer worry about it. I figure, if I croak, someone else will have more food.

    Ordinary OTC medicines and vitamins.

    Dried eggs. You can dry your own too.
     
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  8. Bryan King

    Bryan King Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    Water iveI got plenty of Nat. Sourses close by. Food maybe 2 mo . Plenty of game and fish right outside my door plus some livestock. Meds 3 mo supply and plenty of otc stocked up with first aid supplys. Plus wife and I both have good training in EMT. Good stock of firearms ,need more ammo, caint have enough. Good security, with our training and our self reliant life style I think we would do alright.
     
  9. Guillaume Longval

    Guillaume Longval Friction Fire Addict

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    its the back of a violin. curly maple (grade A1+ super curly) with a complex dying/varvishing process.

    its there because i play it a lot and it represents me well as an avatar. i studied classical up to first year university, then got sick and droped out. what i play now is mostly trad fiddle and gypsie style. just for fun.

    By the way, i think playing music is an underrated long term survival skill we forget in our overstimulated modern lives. no ipod? no radio? no internet? no TV? what do you make of your time then?
     
  10. Torrin

    Torrin Pan Supporter

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    Before the radio, you had no town, if your town didn't have a fiddle player.

    BTW April Verch will be in our town next week. Fiddler and a Clogger, but she's taken. @Guillaume Longval

    On topic, I'd survive until I don't of course. Depending on what goes down, and obviously anything can happen, I feel well prepared in an overall mental sense.
    There are a lot more supplies I could definitely stand to have stock piled. Everytime I try though the 4 kids end up eating it lol.
    At this point more ammo is the mantra, again.
    More ammo, more ammo, I have enough blades, more ammo. I figure ammo will trade well, though it is doubtful I will have enough to trade if the grid was really gone for the longterm future.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2018
  11. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    I wouldn't have guessed maple. It's the color of the wood that threw me off. That was made from a very nice piece indeed. I do some woodworking and though perhaps you made the violin.

    Very true about music being a valuable commodity during stressful times. I'll have to get a larger sim card for my phone and fill it with music - definitely some classical too.

    Thanks for the reply
     
  12. Torrin

    Torrin Pan Supporter

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    I need to start taking a fiddle to the woods with me. I work at a fiddle shop and work on fiddles mostly, as well as guitars, mandolins, anything with strings really.

    It is a family business, and the instruments will be a definite trade option, but they are in town and we don't have good enough storage at the farm.

    Being that IMO survival is mental 1st, musical ability will (is) be an awesome skill to have.
    I need way more practice personally.
     
  13. Guillaume Longval

    Guillaume Longval Friction Fire Addict

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    thats very nice!:4:
    im a woodworker and a violonist, but never made the move. a coworker (who studied in violon making) is giving me the itch again. i want to make at least one in my lifetime... so, @Gary V , its just a question of time.

    i play a Bayer 1926 made in montreal (love it, very round and deep sound but lacking a little volume). but i also have a cheap one for outdoor activities: mostly larp and reenactment events.

    i didnt know april verch, thanks! ill listen her work. i like her style.
     
  14. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    I got my new survival strategy now. A violin and a tin cup!
     
  15. woodsranger

    woodsranger Scout

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  16. EternalLove

    EternalLove Guide

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    I poop in a can and I eat from an outhouse.

    I can survive.
     
  17. Midwest.Bushlore

    Midwest.Bushlore Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    If the water goes out I'll walk down to Lake Coeur d'Alene, there's a zillion gallons down there.:p
     
  18. haunted

    haunted Guide

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    well i am a cannibal so i think youll do..........
     
  19. Togus

    Togus Supporter Supporter

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    The question ought to be can you survive the onslaught of panicking, thieving, and murderous people. All my preparations will do me no good if I’m killed over it or it’s taken from me.
     
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  20. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    I found this to be rather thought provoking.




    Really, if you aren't part of a prepper community, local folks you can trust and depend on, your chances will be slim in a true Sewage Hits The Fan scenario.

    It takes a tribe to survive the apocalypse. I wish I had one. I could hold out for a couple weeks in my little apartment with my humble preps, but that's about it. After that, I'll be hooking up with the homeless down by the river. :(

    Those are the guys who actually know something about urban survival.
     
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  21. LostViking

    LostViking Supporter Supporter

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    @Gary V

    Like selecting a knife, coat, tent, man/woman, or dog. A lot of the questions and answers will be area specific.
    Urban/Rural,
    Hot/Cold,
    Wet/Dry,
    Violent/Calm,

    In today's hype filled world, everything is portrayed as a game ender.
    "No Utilities, Oh My God, We're All Going to Die"

    In reality, mankind has been surviving without utilities for milenia. Most have only seen electric in the last one hundred to one hundred fifty years. Some much later than that. Many still don't have it. Or in america choose not to use it. Or at least not be part of the grid.

    Will it be the same? Certainly not.
    Will some die?
    You bet,

    Guess what?
    Some will die i]even if the gris stays up.

    I see you are from Virginia. So your needs might vary somewhat from my needs up here in the Adirondacks. But we could have a lot of similarities as well. Possibly, depending on where you live in Virginia.

    Urban living and survival is not my forté.
    I long ago chose to avoid that lifestyle. The pace, the pollution, the crime, the noise, just the general 24/7 buzz of urban life never appealed to me.

    Many would say the same about my cold, snowy, remote, eerily quiet woods location.
    Horses for courses.

    Since you specifically asked about food. I'll try to define some of what I see as important about that.

    For reading on the subject. I highly recommend you download a book written long ago by a genleman by the name of Elmer Harry Kreps.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34773.html

    It's free.
    And almost every page is filled with quality, low drama information. Written by a man who did what you are asking about.
    Personally I find the whole book fascinating. But the food section starts on page 48.

    In that setion, Kreps lays out food stores for long periods. It was written in 1919.
    Some may scoff at a book from so long ago. But I feel if the grid drops, we will live in a scenario that very much parallels 1900 America.

    His book was written by and for woodsmen. And long before Oprah, Susan Pouter, or Richard Simmons started counting calories. These men and women worked. They didn't have to worry about calories. If the grid drops, you will work too.

    He does however touch on why certain foods are needed, digestive issues related to some. And in general why he chosses the foods he does.

    Up here where I live. It can get brutally cold for weeks at a time. Spaced by bouts of annoyingly cold in between. From lateOctober through early May, cold is the operative word.

    In some areas, root cellars are dug to keep things cool. Up here, they are dug to keep things from freezing.
    Mr. Kreps spends a great deal of time explaining why eggs, glass jarred fruits and veggies, and other liquid foods are difficult to use. For many reasons. Weight, bulk, fragility, and susceptibility to freezing all factor in.

    Down where you are it is less extreme, so take this with a grain of salt. He also delves into what and when to cook.

    His entire book could be considered a Survival Manual today! Jeez, haven't we become so Dramatic.

    What we call survival.
    Kreps, Kephart, Beard, and Whelen would call camping or Woodcraft. Woodcraft incidentally is the name of Kreps' book.

    Many here will follow the link and read. Of those, some will actually try some of his tips and techniques. Some here are already well beyond.

    There will also be a contingent that will not bother. The reasons are legion. Don't have the time, Old technology, not realistic in today's world, to busy watching the Kardashians or that other reality show .Gov, no color picture, and more.

    Today, it seems more and more folks want to be experts but don't want to invest any time or effort. They may watch a you tube video or two, or a season of Alone. But that is about it.

    I'm actually working on Franchising a store called TEOTWAWKI to Go. TTG for short.
    This way when the world ends, or the grid drops. You just pull up to our drive up window. Hand us your cash. (Sorry No Credit Cards)
    Tell us how many folks you have and how long of a duration you want.
    We will have you pull ahead to the front to the building. Where a nice young man, and a pretty girl, will bring out everything you need and politely load it in your vehicle.

    It won't be cheap. But it will be much easier than actually doing anything yourself.

    Part of the reason I'm still here is. Folks here seem to take this stuff a little more seriously. Even a beginning Bushcrafter will have a leg up on the average person in a grid down scenario.

    One of the reasons Elmer was against anything that could freeze and break was the lack of central heat. He was in a small cabin in the woods. With a makeshift woodstove. It wasn't always above freezing in there. Welcom to the non grid world.

    As I said earlier. I am a huge fan of this book.
    It may lack some of the flare of Nessmuk or Kephart. But the information he jams in it, more than makes up for that.

    As for me personally, I have a mix of old and modern. Lot's of canned and jarred food. Some canned by us. A large supply of flour, corn meal, rice, yeast, and other baking staples.

    I love oatmeal, and have at least three kinds on hand at all times. McCain's Steel cut in the tin can being my favorite.

    Salt, sugar, brown sugar, molasses, maple syrup, olive oil, peanut butter, jellies and jams, coffee beans, teas, hot cocoa. Dried fruits and veggies.

    I know this flies in the face of the "Prepper Mentality" But you won't find a single MRE in my pantry. I'm not necessarily against them. I just don't have any.

    There is fully functioning well appointed Outhouse roughly one hundred fifty feet from where I'm currently typing. It has electric when the grid is up. LED and K1 lamp, when it's not.

    I'm not really a prepper. I have been working toward simplifying my life for a long time now. I won't miss television. Because I don't own one.

    I won't lie. I like electricity. But I won't come unglued it it goes away.

    If I could offer up one suggestion.
    It would be.
    Don't view this as a survival scenario that may or may not happen some day. Instead, start now, and look to simplify your life. Much of what we as a society think we can't live without didn't even exist 100 years ago.

    The dependence on cell phones is a prime example. Sure they are cool. I don't own one of these either. But in contrast to what Verizon and Apple tell you. You won't die if you don't have one. They didn't even exist 30 years ago. For the most part neither did computers.
    This may sound shocking to some. But I got through high school without a cell phone.

    My dad was a boatman. He would be gone for a week or two at a time. When he left, my mom and I said goodbye. When he returned, we said hello. He managed, we managed. No contact in between.

    ***For the record,
    I'm not saying they aren't convienent, or fun, or exciting, or cool. I'm just saying you won't die if you don't have one.


    That ran longer than I anticipated. But I hope it helps you.

    Search out some of my other threads to see how I view things.
    Simple,
    Time tested,
    Portable,
    Works on or off grid,
    Serves more than one purpose,
     
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  22. Glock Holiday

    Glock Holiday Scout

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    What about a volcanic winter??? And would it last for years? Colder than your average cold?
    Yellowstone is probable.
    I need to get some animals to farm, at least rabbits and chickens.
     
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  23. Junglejim

    Junglejim Scout

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    Sorry Soapbox
    Prepping.. do you have enough? It’s like money, do you ever have enough?
    Buying equipment and food will only get you so far. That “so far” maybe enough food for a year, maybe two years, maybe five however there is ALWAYS an end date. What do you do after the prepps run out?

    There were people here, who thrived here, for thousands of years. To me the real question is “how is it that we have lost our way so badly that we no longer know how to live in our natural environment?”

    We are not aliens on this planet. You belong here.

    What did our ancestors do that came before our civilization and how can we relearn what we seemed to have forgot?

    I’ve seen preppers go through a progression:
    You learn that things may not always be as they are
    You get concerned or scared
    You buy prepps
    You start wondering if you have enough
    You realize that it’s not about stuff, it’s about knowledge
    You learn the knowledge
    You learn your not an alien
    You give up the fear

    Life is surviving till we die. We all die, it’s the natural cycle of life. Learn to live life without fear.
     
  24. actiondiver

    actiondiver Tracker

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    We, as in my family could. We have 65 acres, hay fields, woods in which I’ve been planting all sorts of fruiting and nut producing trees, a couple of stocked ponds, a couple of creeks, an artesian spring, a tractor with various attachments, etc.

    My brother has almost 200 head of cattle and more land too. We’d be working together.

    Biggest threat would like likely be and existing government or newly formed government taking the cows for the city folks/greater good.
     
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  25. Twistokane

    Twistokane Tracker

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    On the property we keep Chickens, Rabbits, I also breed Guinea Pigs and have a aquaponic system. Meat & veggies handled. Rabbit does not have enough fat to live off That where the eggs come in not to mention the fish from the aquaponics. Would say plant some sunroot hardy little bugger. Also a lot in the way of wild edibles on the property. Jarring works well. As JungleJim said once you have the knowledge you will be fine. Adding to that is, practice that knowledge, having it and never using it will kill you in the end. I do admit to having a small set of dehydrated food kits. Just in case having to leave and move on ( also take this out into the field for fun trips ). Enough to get us to where we need to go and for setting up the new camp. My favorite is Harmony House Large Sampler Pack. 1 Kit lasts the wife and I a week without adding to it.They also have some really good fruits and soup sets.
     
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  26. elkhunter

    elkhunter Supporter Supporter

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    Me and mine will survive.
     
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  27. LostViking

    LostViking Supporter Supporter

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    ****Think this is so far beyond an excellent post it deserves to be framed!****
     
  28. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    And those who don't will appreciate it's sage wisdom.

    Available for Kindle. Cool. I took a quick gander at it. I love old books. Thanks for the link... and great post. :dblthumb:
     
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  29. Riverpirate

    Riverpirate Supporter Supporter

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    I don't want to....I have lived a good life. If this life gets so hard that I have to struggle to live, I will go visit my Grandfathers in haven.
     
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  30. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    I plan to continue gardening .
     
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  31. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    Knowledge can be regained. The problem is that there are way to many of us to all live off hunting and gathering. Without an organized society we would self destruct until the herd is thinned to a fraction of what it is now. We would either have to work together or be decimated in to small tribes I believe.
     
  32. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    Post SHTF game will be gone in days , when the game is gone then it will be each other.
    Some already have serious plans on protecting their hunting grounds .
     
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  33. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    Agreed. You know if that's the type of scenario you prep for then it might be a good idea to learn and prepare for physiological tactics like "Trespassers Will Be Shot" signs, Blair Witch decorations to hang from trees and so on. Any edge you can give yourself could save your life. Intimidation tactics are proven to work. In the old days they put their enemies heads on poles. <-- this last one may be overkill for a 3 day power outage :)
     
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  34. lil'mike

    lil'mike Supporter Supporter

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    I doubt if I would survive at this point. I had some prep's but not like alot of people have, just some that could last us awhile but since our finances have changed alot and not for the better I have sold off quite a bit and am still working on liquidation more items like knives (ie sak's, mt's, folder's and a fixed blade or two), items that we have had for a long time but haven't used (which is really a good thing) but sold them too. I still have a ways to go on small items/tools but trying not to have more than just a few needed tools/knives. Once that happens then any funds that are left after some unexpected big bills that came up can get paid off, we will start to re-evaluate our prep's again but at a lower percentage.
     
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  35. JoeJ

    JoeJ Supporter Supporter

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    If you were raised on a working farm and learned how to improvise about anything to get a job done right, you have a good chance of surviving about anything thrown at you. If you know how to preserve food and have some food stock, you will do well. Now for those born & bred city folks that know how to spell $50 words and direct the activities of other folks - they better have outstanding barter items and lots of them.:11:
     
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  36. camp casey

    camp casey Guide

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    Propane stove and 375 gallons for it, 6 months of the year we use our wood burning cook stove, tank should last about 22 years.
    My concerns are health and those that choose to do nothing to prepare.
     
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  37. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    ^ ^
    ditto
     
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  38. Glock Holiday

    Glock Holiday Scout

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    Do you have trees? Rocket stoves are so cool
     
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  39. Glock Holiday

    Glock Holiday Scout

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    This made me literally laugh out loud. I would do whatever it took and I have never considered this, although Ive heard of it before. I want trip wire/cordage with those mechanisms that strike a shotgun primer for security.
     
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  40. Lichen

    Lichen Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Being in the desert, water and excessive heat would be my biggest problem. I might last a month.
     
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  41. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    In your case some solar power generation would be important I should think. If you could produce enough reserve battery power to run a well pump once in a while that would solve the water situation. I guess you would have to find ways to deal with the heat like a wet bandanna around the neck and other basic means. Heat is a killer when you get older though and I would likely be a desiccated corpse in under a month.
     
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  42. camp casey

    camp casey Guide

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    C91F73E6-E22A-4699-AB24-136960A37323.jpeg
    We have the firewood supply worked out, do have a rocket stove, I can get wood chips for free by the truck load and they dry quickly in the greenhouse, good luck.
     
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  43. randyt

    randyt Guide

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    I would give it one heck of a go. Would rely largely but not totally on maple sap products and wild rice harvesting. Have some stored dry goods, canned meats, chickens, goats, hogs and rabbits. Livestock could be a bit of a challenge, feeding animals through the winter will be tough here in the north. I have also been developing some guerrilla gardening systems. Planted 50 elderberry shoots this spring, been developing some artichoke patches. Keeping a eye on the choke cherries, june berries, wild apples, etc. Been going to build a solar dehydrator. I have a garden too but really want to go heavy on the perennials.
     
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  44. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    Something occurred to me a few mornings ago, something I haven't heard of as a prep... coffee. That would make a great trade item and it's easy to store. I'm not sure what the shelf life is on canned or vacuum packed coffee though since it's one of those things that doesn't age well. Instant coffee is good for a very long time however. Well, relatively good since it's not too great to start with IMO.

    Just a random though.
     
  45. southron

    southron Guide

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    If you mean could / would i and my clan manage in grubby times? Well we are from the south, had people survive yankee reconstruction and remain un-reconstructed.

    We farm / homestead and The extented clan are all around so ready made "tribe"

    if you mean could I survive being dropped in some remote place with what's in my pockets, probably 50 / 50 chance

    I suspect i'm in a prety good over all position.

    The rest is up to God above.
     
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  46. stingray4540

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    Well, my water is gravity fed from a spring. If all goes well, I’ll have 10 dairy cows on the property next year, so i could always eat them. Plus I can shoot deer in the pasture from my office window, plus an apple orchard and large garden, plus we plan to have chickens next year as well.
    So food and water should be good to go.
    The house is heated by propane however, so staying warm in the winter could be a problem. Probably have to go steal someone’s wood furnace and install it in our bedroom, lol.
    So heat. Heat would be our biggest concern. I’ll have to think about adding a redundant system sometime in the future.
    Ah, and refrigeration. Guess we’d have to smoke or dry all our meat in the summer?
    It would be tough, and a steep learning curve, But I think we’d survive.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
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  47. Gary V

    Gary V Scout

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    Maybe you should get some small animals too like rabbits or sheep. Cows consume a whole lot of feed and water. They might not be manageable without power, a really big pasture or land and fuel for haying or a feed supply. Depending where you live (Virginia here) sheep can survive on a small parcel of land year round without supplemental feed and rabbits need only a handful of vegetation each day and a bit of water. Rabbits are the most efficient meat producing livestock that I'm aware of too.
     
  48. stingray4540

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    well first of all, I need to edit my post for spelling, sheesh! Frigging auto correct.
    We have thought about rabbits too, for sure. We are going to start with chickens and cows first though, we are new to all this.
    The cows will get feed to support their milk production for profit, but if it came to survival, I have 75 acres for them to graze, they would get by fine without supplemental feeding. I would just have to do a hay crop or something to get them through the winter.
    Plus, like I said, there is plenty of game here, deer, turkey, and geese and ducks visit the lake that butts up to our property.
    My biggest concern is keeping my job so the bank doesn’t come and try to take everything from me, but maybe in a survival situation they will have bigger problems than trying to recover their money from my loan?
     
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  49. charlesmc2

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    +1 on the small animals, at least for the south. Tough to preserve beef or pork once you kill the animal. That is assuming we wouldn’t have electricity. A chicken or a rabbit is a convenient meal or two size. A “walking refrigerator.”

    We have truly lost so much knowledge. Amish neighbors would be good to know as they haven’t surrendered to modernity nearly as much.
     
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  50. THRsucks

    THRsucks Guide

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    I have read a good amount of articles for securing a year food supply. The mormon church of LDS has some of the best guides.
    Raw, basic ingredients are the cheapest, although the prep time can be long. It wouldn't be hard for instance to secure enough ingredients to survive on bannock alone for a year, although you would probably hate every second of it.
    Next are noodles, nearly every commercial emergency food supply will have mainly macaroni in them. For a fraction you can buy all of the same stuff and velveta cheese, to have your own. Pre packaged kits are not the way to go unless you are made of money and just don't want to take the time to think about it.
    As far as preserving dry goods you need an airtight container and some for of moisture/atmosphere absorber, one trick i found was using clean 2L soda bottles , for storing beans, oats, and rice. After your bottles are filled, you put in disposable handwarmers. They require oxygen and moisture to generate heat, so they will use up any of those things in a container.
    I was told no other sealing is needed, but just to be sure, you could dip the tops in candle wax to provide additional protection.

    At some point you will have to have a plan longterm for when your stores run dry.

    My plan is simple.

    - enough stored food factoring a 1/3 failure rule. That means a loss of 33% WILL happen. Purchase enough food to cover potential loss and spoilage.
    - that food is a temporary plan, but it must last long enough to out survive other competition for resources. Nearly everyone with a rifle will probably be attempting hunting, looting, scavenging, or gathering resources. Those things will run out, any lag in the rebound of game animals must be planned for.
    - food plots for game animals, rather than attempting to care for enough livestock, i would rather improve the environment for wild animals that take care of themselves.
    -books on foraging wild plants.
    - survival seeds. Just like prepackaged survival kits, survival seed banks can be a bit of a rip off. They may not include plants that thrive in your climate, or that you even enjoy eating. Fall and late summer sales on seeds are all over if you look for them. I buy organic heirloom varieties and call it a day. I store them the same way i store food. Stable climate, cool, and dry.
     
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