Creating Oyster Mushroom Spawn from Grocery Store Fungus

Discussion in 'Homesteading' started by A Seedy Lot, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. A Seedy Lot

    A Seedy Lot Scout

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    Oyster Mushrooms are unique in the fact that the base of the mushroom, stem butts, can be used to propagate the mushroom. I bought an 80 cent mushroom from the store. I picked one that had a base that was not dried out and there were small pockets of fuzzy mycellium.
    stembut1.JPG

    I cut off the caps and upper half of the stems and fried them up, delicious.

    stembut2.JPG

    I pasteurized straw in water as I showed in my other mushroom post. Once cooled I placed the stem butt on top of the straw, closed the lid and waited.
    stembut3.JPG

    After a while the stem butt reverts back to a mycelium state and starts colonizing the straw.

    spawn spread.JPG

    Another few weeks and the straw will be fully colonized ready to fruit or divided out to new growing mediums.
     
  2. funkja

    funkja Scout

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    I grew a lot of mushrooms using sterilized rye berries in jars with Tyvek over the top. Do you have to cold shock colony after you distribute the mycelium on your larger substrate?
     
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  3. A Seedy Lot

    A Seedy Lot Scout

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    Seems like oyster mushroom mycelium is very robust. I have not tried any cold shock treatment to get mycellium to colonize new material but I have cold treated to begin a fruiting cycle.

    I have tried grain for spawn, which seems to be a standard practice, I just could not get a system that worked for me. If it was not for stem butts I would have no spawn.
     
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  4. AdirondackBadger

    AdirondackBadger Scout

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    Great post. Thanks for sharing. Looking forward to the updates.
     
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  5. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    When divided what do you use as a growing medium?
    I like Oyster mushrooms and they cost $21- a kilo here and I'd like to try this. I have a source of coffee grounds too if that would assist
     
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  6. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Watching... I have a crawl space that should be full of mushrooms... don’t I wish.
     
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  7. A Seedy Lot

    A Seedy Lot Scout

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    @Moondog55,

    There are many substrates for oysters to grow on. I have read that some people have had good luck with coffee grounds but when I tried it did not work for me. There is a lot of information on the net about growing oyster mushrooms, you might have to experiment a bit to figure out what works for you and your available resources.

    A guy selling oyster mushrooms at our local farmers market was using aspen chips sold as animal bedding, when that source dried up he started using oak pellets for a pellet stove.

    One can use this same stem butt principle and inoculate dowel pins that then can be inserted into holes drilled in logs.

    I have thought about trying to inoculate a poplar tree log with mycellium straw by splitting the log with wedges and then stuffing the open split with the straw.

    Moisture management is very important, if the substrate dries out the mycellium is not very happy.
     
  8. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    All of the above are worth trying. In drought ridden Southern Australia keeping things moist is a real big problem. No rain here for 2 months
     

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