CWD - Looks like I will have to learn a new skill

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Gathering' started by ozarkhunter, Jul 11, 2018.

  1. ozarkhunter

    ozarkhunter Guide Vendor

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    I read through the regs for deer hunting one of the properties that I have to hunt this fall. The "zone" that it is in had a confirmed case of CWD last fall. Feeders are allowed from September 1 - Dec. 31 on private property. Previously you could feed year round. I run a feeder to draw deer close enough for my 82 year old dad to get a shot from his blind. Last year it drew a lot of feral hogs, which I hope to knock off as many of those as I can this fall/winter using my thermal on my AR.

    Now, to the new skill... Regs say you can't move any skin, teeth, bones or skulls of a deer taken in the county out of that county. You have to remove the meat on site from the deer and dispose of the remaining parts... still haven't read about the appropriate disposal process. I have always field dressed my deer and hauled them to the processor. Looks like I will be viewing some youtube videos on how to process deer in the field. I also have to check to see if the processor will process hogs from that county or if that has any regs to that regard.
     
  2. Hunt4lyf

    Hunt4lyf Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    That's kinda stupid, the prions are found in the brains and spinal fluid, not bones, skin, etc...

    Then, if the animal does have CWD you just left everything with the disease in the woods and on the ground, and if I remember correctly the CWD prion doesn't die from exposure to the elements so if a deer comes along a month later and eats grass that had the prions on it from where you butchered it then it now has the prion.

    You couldn't bury it deep enough to keep the pigs and coyote from digging it back up.

    CWD is a no win situation.

    Look up the gutless method, it's what I use for backcountry butchering.
     
  3. hlydon

    hlydon Scout

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    I’ve processed them in the field. In fact, that’s what I did with my first deer. Not hard at all. I prefer to do it all myself.

    I contacted Ohio DNR last year asking if there were any rules on disposing of carcasses. (Not sure about CWD areas.) I was told there are no specific laws. I suppose leaving a carcas on public land could be considered littering.
     
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  4. stillman

    stillman Guide Bushclass I

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    You can get a skinning pole that fits in a truck's receiver hitch. That would keep you from having to skin and quarter on the ground.
     
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  5. CSM1970

    CSM1970 Scout

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    Here in Texas, we are reported to have over 2 million feral hogs. The prevailing method of taking them is devolving to hand grenades. Kills them and guts them in one step
     
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  6. Danno

    Danno Tracker

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    Are there any deer processers within the county that you could use?
    Skinning and de-boning isn't that hard but it is time consuming. Having plenty of deer around, we don't get to wound up about getting every single scrap of meat off the carcass; front and rear quarters, neck, straps & t-loins and we're about done. It's the stuff like cutting all the meat out of the ribcage that gets tedious, we leave that for the critters. Tallow gets hung up for the birds to enjoy, and boy do they!
     
  7. stillman

    stillman Guide Bushclass I

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    I boil the ribs to make stock.
     
  8. ozarkhunter

    ozarkhunter Guide Vendor

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    You may have just saved me a lot of time and effort. I normally use a processor that is in a different zone, and on the way back out the same direction I go to this property (about an hour from home). I just checked and there is a processor about 15 miles from the property, in the same deer zone. I called and they will process deer from this zone (as well as hogs) and send the deer head to the game and fish for testing for CWD. THANKS! I had not even thought of that.
     
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  9. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Bushmaster

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    Butchering a deer is pretty easy and you can find YouTube videos. You can also break muscle groups small enough to fit in a gallon ziplock and put it in a cooler.

    You are better off learning to process your own game because the processor will give you poundage back instead of what you turned in.
     
  10. Riverpirate

    Riverpirate Supporter Supporter

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    They should do away with baiting all together.
     
  11. ozarkhunter

    ozarkhunter Guide Vendor

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    And then 80 year old men who do good to walk 100 yards could just stay at home and reminisce...
     
  12. vdeal

    vdeal Scout

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    I agree on doing away with the baiting issue. Deer congregating at bait rapidly spreads CWD. Of course backyard do-gooders feeding the deer don't help either. As for the 80 year old why not find a natural bait site like an apple tree or other spot. There are always alternatives.
     
  13. Riverpirate

    Riverpirate Supporter Supporter

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    It is all about finding where they go when you can't bring them to you. My 80 YO father kills them from ground blinds all the time.
     
  14. longcruise

    longcruise Tracker

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    Here in cColorado it has been determined that feeding wildlife brings deer into close contact and does spread CWD. It's unlawful to feed wildlife here period and has been since long before cwd was detected. Some people, especially resort operators, persist as do some people who do it for themselves.

    It's also unlawful to plant anything for the purpose of attracting wildlife. It's legal to hunt over and near crops planted for agricultural purposes but that's it. Hunting deer near a 160 acre corn field can be productive I suppose.

    So, even food plots are not allowed.

    There is strong support for the idea that propinquity is a factor in the transmission of the disease. Below I'm quoting from findings in a Colorado wildlife study.

    If you don't want to to read the whole thing, a summary is that deer in a research pen were found to be infected. The deer were removed and the pen cleaned. No animals were in the pen for 8 1/2 years. Then uninfected deer were put in the pen and eventually became infected.

    Quote below:

    "a small captive white-tailed deer herd was established at the Colorado Division of Wildlife’s (CDOW) Foothills Wildlife Research Facility (FWRF; Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; 4035N,10510W) in 1993 for use in fertility control studies. The subsequent natural occurrence of CWD in this herd afforded the opportunity to observe epidemic dynamics in captive whitetailed deer and compare them with those of contemporary cohorts of captive mule deer, which were also naturally infected with CWD."

    "Captive mule deer held in what is now the FWRF had been infected with CWD since at least the late 1960s (Williams and Young, 1992). After attempting to eradicate CWD from the FWRF in 1985 by killing all captive mule deer and elk and cleaning the facility (Williams and Young, 1992; Miller et al., 1998), a new mule deer research herd was started in 1990 with nine animals (Miller and Williams, 2003). This founder herd was augmented by natural births and ‘‘orphan’’ fawns. Founders and orphans were accepted only from outside areas where CWD was known to be endemic. Despite extensive preventive measures, a case of CWD was diagnosed in 1994 in a FWRF-born female from the 1991 cohort. This represented the beginning of another CWD epidemic in captive mule deer (Fig. 1), 8.5 yr after the last infected deer had lived at FWRF."

    End of quotes.

    This, IMO, supports not allowing baiting.

    It probably comes across as cold and heartless, but eventually we will all reach a point in life where we will be physically unable to hunt. Your dad probably isn't there yet. There are probably ways to keep him in the hunt without baiting. I suspect that you will do your best to find a way. Speaking as a guy who will turn 72 in a couple weeks, i hope you find a way!
     
  15. Eric Westbrook

    Eric Westbrook Supporter Supporter

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    Man, I wish they would!
     
  16. ozarkhunter

    ozarkhunter Guide Vendor

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    I hope to get a camera out in the next couple of weeks to monitor the area where we put his blind last year. We'll see what shows up with no feeder. Curious to see... Processor reported 2 positive cases in the county last season. More cases were reported in counties where game and fish brought in elk from CO probably a decade ago. Some AR hunters question if the elk were checked for CWD before being relocated to AR. I've never heard a definitive statement to confirm or deny. I do know that the game and fish will issue additional tags to land owners in the designated CWD zones in an effort to kill more deer that could potentially be effected. I'm no game biologist, so I don't pretend to know all of the pros and cons of killing off more deer and what it might do to curb the spread of something that apparently stays around for such an extended period.

    Dad took a spill in his garden snapping a few "suckers" off of his tomato plants last week. Fortunately the soil is very loose and likely cushioned his fall. His pinky finger was bruised from the tip back to the palm of his hand where he jammed the finger into the soil. He said if it weren't for the tomato stake in the ground, he might not have been able to get back up. He knows he doesn't have many years left to get out and hunt. That said, he enjoys every trip out to the woods.
     
  17. WY_Not

    WY_Not Supporter Supporter

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    When my grandfather got up there in years (also had one leg amputated at the knee due to diabetes complications) he also had trouble getting around but like your dad he still wanted to get out and hunt. My dad and uncle would construct a blind out of stacked round bales. Grandpa would drive the golf cart out and back it in and hunt. He was able to squeeze a few more seasons in and harvest a few more deer before passing.
     
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