Dehydrated foods

Discussion in 'Food' started by hlydon, Feb 18, 2019.

  1. hlydon

    hlydon Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,330
    Likes Received:
    3,873
    Location:
    SW Ohio
    I recently dehydrated some chicken tenders which I cut into 1/2” pieces. A couple of websites I read said pressure cooking helps break the fibers in a way the makes them reconstitute better, so pressure cooked them first.

    I tested a few by putting them in ramen as I cooked the ramen. The chicken was a little chewing but retained good flavor. My plan is to use the chicken with ramen or rice and chicken bouillon when out hiking or camping.

    Anybody have a particular go food they find is good for taking on trips? Any particular fruits, meats, etc.?
     
    bacpacjac, JKR, Bobsdock and 9 others like this.
  2. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Messages:
    1,543
    Likes Received:
    5,349
    Location:
    NYC
    Somethings i do
    Dry various veggies , peppers, mushrooms , and add them to pasta/rice
    I also dehydrate tomato paste and use it as a sauce
    I make jerky and eat it as is and also cut it up and add it to meals
    Frozen mixed veggies are great to dehydrate great addition to just about any meal
     
    bacpacjac, JKR, bgf and 5 others like this.
  3. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    17,525
    Likes Received:
    23,669
    Location:
    In the woods
    Never had much luck dehydrating chicken... it seems to shred and fall apart when I do it.

    I stick mostly with venison/beef stew for my own work. I also do fruit leathers (jar of apple sauce on 3 trays). My favorite 'commercial' stuff is Hawk Vittles, especially the Bison Stew, Buffalo Pasta, and Sweet Italian Sausage. His Beef Stew is the same as the bison, only beef and therefore about half the price.

    I've had good luck with navy beans, corn, jerky, carrots, apples, but don't do them as much.
     
    bacpacjac, bgf, Haggis and 3 others like this.
  4. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2015
    Messages:
    2,638
    Likes Received:
    9,535
    Dried beans work best to about half-cook, then dehydrate. Otherwise, they need to soak a long time, and you can't easily have just one thing to reconstitute. Meals in a jar are good. We haven't tried chicken. We purchased some freeze-dried hamburger, it works well.
     
    bacpacjac, bgf, Haggis and 3 others like this.
  5. Bushcraft and Brews

    Bushcraft and Brews Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2019
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    1,150
    Location:
    Virginia
    I actually just finished dehydrating dirty rice. 185 degrees in the oven for 6 hours. 1.5 parts water to 1 part rice. It turned out pretty good.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
    bacpacjac, bgf, Haggis and 3 others like this.
  6. hlydon

    hlydon Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,330
    Likes Received:
    3,873
    Location:
    SW Ohio
    Thanks. I thought about trying frozen veggies. I dehydrate mushrooms as well.
     
    bacpacjac, bgf, Haggis and 1 other person like this.
  7. kronin323

    kronin323 the barbarian Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,531
    Likes Received:
    8,099
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Doesn't rice already come dehydrated?
     
    bacpacjac, Wasp, Schmittie and 3 others like this.
  8. tch1718a

    tch1718a Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2017
    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    1,880
    I dehydrate anything that stands still too long in my house.

    Frozen mixed vegetables are great to add to taken or most any meal, but to rehydrate just them for a side dish it's more trouble to me than ours worth.

    Favorite dehydrated field meal is cabbage rolls. Prepare them normally using very low fat meat. Shred and dehydrate any leftover and vacuum seal.

    This guy has a wealth of knowledge and ideas on his site.

    https://www.backpackingchef.com
     
    bacpacjac, bgf, Haggis and 3 others like this.
  9. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2015
    Messages:
    2,638
    Likes Received:
    9,535
    We have been dehydrating for a couple of years, the Excalibur line is near top of the heap for home use. The ability to make healthy, non-sodium laden meals that are things we like is great. Still, there are some things that don't dehydrate well. Meats (discounting jerky), cheeses, eggs, dairy items. A great companion to a dehydrator would be a freeze-drying system, but they just are not there yet, for home use on my level. Most everything is higher-end, and too large for hobby home use. I haven't checked for a year or so, but something that costs $10,000 and needs half a room isn't going to pay for itself for my use (it could be, for a group). There are smaller ones, but their forums are filled with DIY/tinkering/mad professor schemes to make it more reliable, or work better. And this is on brand new ones.

    Freeze-dried items I think also have a much longer shelf life than just plain dehydrated food. I think being able to combine dehydrated with freeze-dried food would let you put together some great combinations. Ahh well, someday.

    Edit to add: A vacuum sealer is a great companion to a dehydrator.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
    bacpacjac, bgf, Haggis and 1 other person like this.
  10. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2015
    Messages:
    2,638
    Likes Received:
    9,535
    Yes, but raw ingredients and a prepared dish are not the same.
     
    bacpacjac, bgf and Haggis like this.
  11. kronin323

    kronin323 the barbarian Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,531
    Likes Received:
    8,099
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    It was rhetorical.
     
    bacpacjac, Wasp, bgf and 1 other person like this.
  12. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2015
    Messages:
    2,638
    Likes Received:
    9,535
    @kronin323 Kinda like beans. As they come, there's nothing much dryer, but they don't work as-is for a quick rehydration. I mentioned dehydrating the partially-cooked beans, found it again here. It seems redundant to soak beans, then cook them partially, then dehydrate them. Then re-hydrate them to eat. We've done it several times, works well. Beans can add protein to otherwise veggy-type dehydrated things.
     
    bacpacjac, bgf, Haggis and 1 other person like this.
  13. kronin323

    kronin323 the barbarian Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,531
    Likes Received:
    8,099
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Yeah dry beans take much, much longer to cook than dry rice. Even though they're good for your heart.
     
    bacpacjac, bgf, Haggis and 1 other person like this.
  14. Brook Trout

    Brook Trout Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2014
    Messages:
    499
    Likes Received:
    878
    9EA61F0C-EECF-42C4-B488-6FDE38E6CAB7.jpeg

    Dehydrated some canned corn last night for an upcoming canoe trip. For packing trips, mostly have done veggies in the past (corn, potatoes, carrots)—easy to rehydrate and mix in some bullion for a simple soup. Dehydrated spaghetti sauce once for an Alaskan float trip—but don’t recall being all that impressed with it. Also wild mushrooms on occasion.

    Agree that vacuum packing and dehydrating are a great combo.

    Didnt realize until recently you can dehydrate hamburger—will probably give that a try (and/or some chicken) as I start to ramp up prep for my spring trip.
     
    bacpacjac, bgf, Haggis and 1 other person like this.
  15. tch1718a

    tch1718a Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2017
    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    1,880

    The best way I've found with hamburger is to buy the leanest you can find, cook it thoroughly, put it in a colander and rinse with hot water then cook it a little more with some bread crumbs in a clean pan. The Bread crumbs seem to help it rehydrate better.

    Then use it in your meal recipe mixture. I have used this method for cabbage rolls with great outcome. Better than preparing the rolls and then shredding them.
     
    bacpacjac, marbleman, bgf and 2 others like this.
  16. Forestcactus

    Forestcactus ate a bug once Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2018
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    579
    I bought a dehydrator from my local aldi for 25 bucks a few months back and it's been great so far. Currrently have a big batch of cherry tomatoes going for use in stews. Working on perfecting a chili recipe, i will post it up when it's where i want it.
     
  17. Brook Trout

    Brook Trout Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2014
    Messages:
    499
    Likes Received:
    878
    Thanks for reminding me about the bread crumbs trick--I read about that somewhere previously, but had forgotten all about it. I'll be giving it a try within the next few weeks.
     
    bacpacjac and bgf like this.
  18. Brook Trout

    Brook Trout Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2014
    Messages:
    499
    Likes Received:
    878
    Anyone remember the comedian Steven Wright? "I bought some powdered water, but I don't know what to add."

    His humor was kinda out of left field, but I liked it!
     
  19. OutnBacker

    OutnBacker Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2013
    Messages:
    2,028
    Likes Received:
    4,866
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hamburger is my favorite meat to dehydrate. It has to be the very lean grade. There's a couple that go by the handle "Pine Martin" on YouTube. They dehydrate a lot. Anyway, I have burger over a year old and its just fine. The key is to get the fat out by thorough rinsing in hot tap water after it is well cooked and granulated. No clumps. You dump it into a colander and press out the remaining fat with the back of a big serving spoon while rinsing.

    Dry it in any dehydrator. It dries fast. Should be cracklin' dry when done. Seasoning while it cooks is sort of self defeating since you rinse it so well, so I do it when I cook it up in camp.

    I pre pack it into single servings with dried peas and corn. Makes about a cup of re-hydrated meat. In another packet there's potato flakes for mashed potatoes. Total yield is about 2 cups. Think: Shepard's Pie. Great comfort food in camp.

    I've tried drying canned or frozen corn and am generally disappointed. All brands from cheap to fancy. It just comes out tough and chewy, no matter what - even after re-hydrating. I think making parched corn is better . Peas work better in a dehydrator, and make a good pocket snack. Not rock hard, bit tough, but nice and sweet.

    Chick peas are awful. Dry and dusty. I recommend an oven roast instead for those. Fantastic.

    Then, there's always jerky, which I haven't made yet.

    ...I think I'll go roast some more chick peas...
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2019
    bacpacjac, Brook Trout and bgf like this.
  20. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2015
    Messages:
    2,638
    Likes Received:
    9,535
    Dehydrators are a recurring theme here, here's about 300 threads about it. I'll repeat here a couple of our favorites, a good and easy and tasty thing to do is dehydrate apple slices, and tomato slices. With apple, sprinkle a little cinnamon/sugar/whatever you like on it before you dehydrate. Tomatoes are good with a little basil/garlic/whatever you like on it. The apple slices are like tiny desserts, and the tomatoes are like tiny pizzas.

    But be aware, this can be a rabbit hole to go down, albeit a good one that saves you money. The vacuum sealer is great, and don't forget the O2 absorbers, they can keep stuff for years. Then you might find you're spending too much on the rolls of vacuum bags (tip: Bed Bath and Beyond often has good deal on them for some strange reason). Then you discover there's a nifty little attachment that fits over a Mason jar, and sucks the lid down on it tight....

    But the very first accessory you should get? A Mandoline Slicer.

    [​IMG]

    It's easy to cut things with a knife, but it's hard to make slices perfectly parallel. This thing does it, and easy. With any dehydrator you have to spend some time to learn it, and throw out a few batches of crispy critters while you are figuring it out. Perfectly even thickness slices dry uniformly, which is the key. With hand-cut slices that will taper a little bit, one end can be like a rock, and the other end not done. For snacking tomatoes, you can slice them so thin you can see through them (hard to do with a knife), they're like potato chips. Thicker ones are perfect to throw in a pot of anything (or on a pizza).

    The accessory blades also let you easily make 'normal' food. Perfect julienne fries, or hash browns. You can get them from $9 to big bucks. Don't cheap out too much on one, it will last you for years. They can't be sharpened (unless you are a knife fanatic, then maybe). These slicers are intended for fruits and vegetables, not so much for meat.

    Here's a good comparison review of several.
     
  21. hlydon

    hlydon Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,330
    Likes Received:
    3,873
    Location:
    SW Ohio
    @marbleman I literally just sliced some venison with a knife to put in the dehydrator before I saw the mandolin post. I should have thought about that. I’ll definitely use it for apples and future dehydrating. Thanks.
     
    bacpacjac and marbleman like this.
  22. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2013
    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    820
    Location:
    Adirondacks NY
    I don't rinse cooked ground beef, as I believe that doing so washes away much of the flavor. I cook it with onion and seasoning of choice. Near the end of cooking I mix in a couple tablespoons of flour. You only want to get rid of most of the fat before storage. After cooking the leanest beef I can find, I spread it on a metal cookie sheet on paper towels, then press it with another cookie sheet on top to squeeze out the excess fat. Then I package it and store it in the freezer until ready to take into the field.

    Beans.... refried beans dehydrate and rehydrate perfectly. I make tacos with refried beans, taco seasoned ground beef, dehydrated salsa and fresh cheese. I also add a can of kidney beans with onions and peppers to tomato sauce, puree it before dehydrating to become a hearty camp spaghetti sauce. You can mix with cooked pasta before dehydrating it all. Or dehydrate the sauce separately if you like.

    Bricks of hash browns dehydrate and rehydrate easily. I get them frozen from Aldis or Walmart in packs of 20. Break them up, dehydrate, then crush. Rehydrate in only 5 minutes in hot water then serve with a fresh prepared country gravy mix. Maybe add some of the rehydrated ground beef too.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019
    bacpacjac likes this.
  23. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2015
    Messages:
    2,638
    Likes Received:
    9,535
    You are putting the chunks in the dehydrator frozen? The dehydration process will certainly thaw them. Sounds interesting.
     
    bacpacjac likes this.
  24. Yknpdlr

    Yknpdlr Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2013
    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    820
    Location:
    Adirondacks NY
    Well, yes, it doesn't really matter. I usually break the bricks up into smaller pieces. After dehydrating they will be crunchy and I further break up the dry chunks before packaging.
     
    bacpacjac and marbleman like this.
  25. Bush Billy

    Bush Billy Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2017
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    515
    Location:
    Princeton MN
    I haven't gone on too many really long hikes in the past year, so my dehydrating has slowed down. If I'm carrying my water for my shorter hikes, it doesn't make sense to re-hydrate in the field. Only if I collect water in the field does it make a difference. . .no reason to remove the water. . . carry the water. . .re-add the water. My favorites though include chili and just about any hotdish (that's Minnesotan for casserole). Since they contain more fat than the gravel (dehydrated hamburger) I'll vacuum seal and store them in the freezer. They easily keep for a couple of days and the added fat sticks to the ribs longer.
     
    bacpacjac likes this.
  26. tch1718a

    tch1718a Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2017
    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    1,880

    Hasn't thought of the carrying water thing, but that's a very valid point.
    I just realized when i carry dehydrated meals, I'm o out for multiple days and can source - filter water on site or nearby. Day trips its usually just pocket snacks and maybe a dehydrated just in case meal in my bag.
    I know s some folks that carry the water and meals in. Funny now that you mention it.
     
    Bush Billy likes this.

Share This Page