DIY rouge bars

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by Todd Ziegler, Aug 16, 2018.

  1. Todd Ziegler

    Todd Ziegler Tracker

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    Has anyone made their own rouge bars? If so what ingredients did you use and how did you do it This is part of my ongoing experiments into DIY sharpening tools. I am still doing some trials with diamond pastes and when I am done I will post my findings. However gathering information from other people who have tried these things is invaluable, even the failures help me
     
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  2. central joe

    central joe Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I think that they are cheap enough that it isn't worth the trouble. I have only bought 3 or 4 in my life. They last so long that I lose it before I use it up. Just my thought. joe
     
  3. Todd Ziegler

    Todd Ziegler Tracker

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    You are right but this is strictly an experiment to find out how different DIY/homemade recipes work I plan on submitting a detailed post on my results because I found that there are people who like to do it themselves but information is scattered all over the place.
     
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  4. DarrylM

    DarrylM Supporter Supporter

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    I've heard that mineral oil will help soften an overly hard compound. A couple drops to soak in for several minutes. Perhaps some goes into the recipe as well?
     
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  5. Todd Ziegler

    Todd Ziegler Tracker

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    I've heard that too. I am really interested in people who may have used a wax of some kind to create a bar. I have spent the last few weeks mixing different diamond pastes using several different products as a carrier. I had 2 batches out of 6 that I considered to be a success
     
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  6. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    I've re-constituted a green compound by digging the old crumbly stuff from containers it was in, melted it (using a heat gun) with a part of a paraffin candle, and poured it into an aluminum foil tube.
     
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  7. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I understand wanting to make things yourself. But, a source of abrasive material doesn’t seem like a thing one could ‘find’ if this is a hedge against rouge sticks not being available. If just for fun, it might be ... fun. If not, buying the sticks seems the only practical way to go.
    I haven’t found any diamond dust or carborundum mines in my locality.
     
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  8. wingnuts

    wingnuts Hunter/Gatherer Provider/Protector Supporter

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    I can’t imagine that it would be cheaper to make a compound from diamonds! I use the stuff in lapidary work and never even considered using it anywhere else! It comes in like 3cc tubes and is exteremely fine. It would probably work really well but guessing if used in any quantity would drive you to the poor house
     
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  9. Todd Ziegler

    Todd Ziegler Tracker

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    I like learning how to make things. It has nothing to do with wanting to save money. When I make things myself I get a great satisfaction of having learned how to make something that I didn't know how to before. Also by doing these DIY projects I learn a lot of peripheral things. On top of that I may come up with a better way design, idea or a much better product that I could make money from. I love doing research and tracking down the ingredients. However in the end it is a great satisfying experience for me. I am still looking for a recipe for a crox bar. I have the chromium oxide and yellow iron oxide plus some parrifen wax but I can't find how much to use of each or if there are any other ingredients besides the powder and parrifen wax. If anyone has any ideas I would love to hear more about it
     
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  10. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    I did have some luck using sifted cigar ash. The ash was mixed into hot paraffin untill almost crumbly when still hot. I squished it quicky into an aluminum foil (3/4 inch) tube and allowed it to cool over night before using.
     
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  11. Todd Ziegler

    Todd Ziegler Tracker

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    I was guessing that I would probably need to use more powder than wax. I want to get as close as I can to having a bar that is hard but softens when rubbing it on leather, cotton wheel or felt. I was thinking of maybe 4 or 3:1, 4or3:2 What ratio do you think?
     
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  12. EternalLove

    EternalLove Guide

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    You can use clay/dirt/sand. This could be made finer through sifting and grinding down in a motar and pestle. This could be rubbed on leather/wood/cardboard for stropping sharp edges. If you find a combination that you like, you can wet it and form it into a bar.
     
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  13. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    I honestly couldn't say ratios on this. I used it on a buffing wheel so I made it pretty hard, almost brittle. I would think about "crayon" hardness would be about right for a leather strop compound. You'll have to experiment on that one.
     
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  14. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    I hadn't thought of that. Fine bentonite powder (ground/sifted kitty litter, unused :D) might work quite well with a paraffin binder.
     
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  15. Todd Ziegler

    Todd Ziegler Tracker

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    The ingredients that I will using are chromium oxide .5-1 micron, yellow iron oxide 44 micron, red iron oxide 25 micron, ultramarine blue 2 micron, black iron oxide 10 micron. These were relatively cheap and easily found. I also have some rottenstone that I may try making a bar of. Right now I use the rotten stone for polishing old pieces of wood with polyurethane finishing
     
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  16. Todd Ziegler

    Todd Ziegler Tracker

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    I almost bought the bentonite but decided that I had enough ingredients for now.
     
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