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Elders Challenge #1

Discussion in 'Tree and Plant ID Database' started by GreyOne, Jun 30, 2010.

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  1. tennecedar

    tennecedar Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I'm having difficulties postin pics. I'll figure it out and get em up soon.
     
  2. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    That is some sexxxy hardwood, brother. I'd leave the bark partially on, just cause of the cool red color:D
    Good work Buck!
    Nice work!
    PMZ
     
  3. buroak

    buroak Guide Bushclass I

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    The last one does appear to be mulberry.
     
  4. Buckskin

    Buckskin Guide

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    Thank you buroak! I will try to burn that one into my head now that I am reasonably sure that is what it is.
     
  5. Keyser Söze

    Keyser Söze Usual Suspecto Supporter Lifetime Supporter

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    backyard tree id

    please feel free to correct me if i'm wrong so i can tag them correctly, thanks:)
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. FishBone

    FishBone Guest

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    Can I post to this thread anymore? I always see that its a recent thread but never see an update.. Maybe I'm coo coo..

    *** EDIT - NEVERMIND.. I WAS LOOKING AT JOIN DATES.. LOL.. IT APPEARS I AM COO COO ***
     
  7. Keyser Söze

    Keyser Söze Usual Suspecto Supporter Lifetime Supporter

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    what type of WEED your smokin?? LOL :D can you ID it ?? -POST IF YOU HAVE PICS OF TREES-
     
  8. buroak

    buroak Guide Bushclass I

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    Here is my first one. First and far most is my signature tree, the Bur Oak. Of all the trees, this one is my favorite. I planted this tree from an acorn 41 years ago. It is now a large, beautiful tree. I have planted many different trees from seed over the years but this one I am most proud of. You will notice the leaves are curled up on the edges. This is herbicide spray damage from all the farmers around me spraying their fields in the spring. They spray when there is too much wind blowing and a huge fog of the poison not only goes on their fields but also covers the entire area. Oaks are especially susceptible to the spray especially when the new leaves are just coming out in the spring. No telling what our lungs look like!


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Great job Gaga, thats getin it done Buddy
     
  10. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Nice to se ya back BurOak, we've missed ya
     
  11. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    BurOak, can you look at post #27 -by Trek- last photo. It is a very large oak leaf, and is suspected of being a Buroak :). Can you give us a better ID ?
    Thanks, G1
     
  12. buroak

    buroak Guide Bushclass I

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    I don’t think it is a bur oak, Quercus macrocarpa, unless it is a non typical leaf from the tree. A typical leaf is a leaf that looks like the majority of the other leaves on a tree. You can always find non typical leaves which in no way resemble the other leaves on a tree. Without seeing the tree, it is hard to tell. A typical bur oak leaf usually has at least one deep sinus on each side of the leaf somewhere near the middle of the leaf.

    It is defiantly an oak. It doesn’t appear to have bristle pointed lobes which would put it in the white oak group. Oaks can be generally divided into two main groups. Oaks in the white oak group, such as white oak, Quercus alba, post oak, Q. stellata, bur oak, Q. macrocarpa, chinquapin oak, Q. muehlenburgii, swamp white oak, Q. bicolor, etc, do not have bristle pointed lobes. Oaks in the black oak group such as black oak, Q. velutina, northern red oak, Q. rubra, pin oak, Q. palustris, shingle oak, Q. imbricaria, etc, have bristle pointed lobes. In the case of the shingle oak, it usually has no lobes and has only one bristle on the tip of the leaf. If that one bristle is gone, chewed off by a bug or whatever, it would appear it should belong in the white oak group, however it is in the black oak group. This is a good example of why other characteristics along with the leaf and always looking for a typical leaf is important in tree identification.

    A good rule of thumb is to never pick a leaf off a tree until you have identified the tree. There are other important identifying characteristics for identifying a tree besides the leaves, such as bark, buds, shape, habitat, flowers, seed, etc. and they should all be taken into consideration when identifying a tree.

    I hope this helps.
     
  13. buroak

    buroak Guide Bushclass I

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    Here is a few more. Number 1 is Slippery Elm, Ulmus rubra. The bark from small branches makes very good cordage. It is my favorite fresh cordage that can be used green right off the tree.
    [​IMG]

    Number 2 is Osage Orange, Maclura pomifera. In my area it is also called Hedge-apple. It is a very good wood for making bows.

    [​IMG]

    Number 3 is Blue Beech, Carpinus caroliniana. It is also called Ironwood, among several other names. I like to call it Ironwood because the trunk looks like a huge muscle. It is sometimes used as a bow wood.

    [​IMG]

    Number 4 is Chinese Chestnut, Castanea mollissima. This should not be confused with the American Chestnut, C. dentate. I find the nut to be very good, so do the squirrels!

    [​IMG]
     
  14. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    The Slipper Elm and the Osage Orange we have around here, but I am unaware of any Beech at all in my area. Wish we had some, beech wood and bark seems so useful. ;)
    Thanks, Buroak!
     
  15. buroak

    buroak Guide Bushclass I

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    It is called Blue Beech but is not related to the American Beech. It is an all together different tree. This is where common names get us confused. Some other common names for it include, American Hornbeam, Muscle-beech, Smooth-barked ironwood, Water Beech, and Ironwood! However, using the Latin name, Carpinus caroliniana, you can’t get it wrong!
     
  16. buroak

    buroak Guide Bushclass I

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    Here’s a few more. The first one is Horse Chestnut, Aesculus hippocastanum. It should not be confused with the chestnuts. It is in the same genus as the buckeyes. I think it is an attractive ornamental.

    [​IMG]

    The second one is the Ohio Buckeye, Aesculus glabra. I think it is also an attractive ornamental.

    [​IMG]

    The third one is Shingle Oak, Quercus imbricaria. This tree has an interesting history. Back when log cabins were being built, Shingle Oak was the tree of choice in Illinois for making the roof shingles. Large, straight grain trees were blocked up and the shingles were split out using a froe.

    [​IMG]

    The forth one is Carolina Buckthorn, Frangula (sometimes called Rhamnus) caroliniana. This buckthorn is a small, thornless tree and is a native of Illinois. It is usually an understory tree mixed with other hardwoods and is commonly overlooked. I really like the looks of it. In the first picture of it, the leaves resemble pawpaw, however, they are much smaller than pawpaw. In the second picture, you can see a berry-like seed.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The last picture is a White Peach. This particular tree also has an interesting history. I got a start of it from an old lady that lived close to us. I used to mow her yard when I was nine or ten. That was about 50 years ago! The original tree I planted has long since died. However, I have two trees that I started from seed that came from my original tree. This white peach is smaller than a regular peach and they ripen later than a regular peach. It has to be a very old variety.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    Bur, thank you so much for sharing!
    I figgered as much re: the oak leaf. Your "don't pick till after ID" rule seems a good one in hindsight:eek:

    Around here we call the ironwood/hornbeam "musclewood" or at least that's what my Dad calls it.

    PMZ
     
  18. nickosnow

    nickosnow Guide

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    Did the best I could with the little knowledge I have regarding plant ID'ing. I can usually tell what kind of trees I come across but when it comes to the specific species I'm a little lost. Please critic!


    Birch tree trunk and branches. Paper/White Birch
    [​IMG]
    Birch trunk
    [​IMG]
    Birch tree trunk closeup
    [​IMG]
    Birch leaves.
    [​IMG]
    Birch leaf closeup.
    [​IMG]
    Birch leaf backside closeup
    [​IMG]
    Inside birch bark
    [​IMG]
    Birch stump
    [​IMG]


    Maple my guess is Sugar Maple.
    [​IMG]
    Maple trunk and branches.
    [​IMG]
    Maple leaves.
    [​IMG]
    Maple leaves closeup
    [​IMG]
    Maple leaf backside.
    [​IMG]



    Ash tree. My guess is White Ash.
    [​IMG]
    Ash trunk and leaves
    [​IMG]
    Ash leaves.
    [​IMG]
    Ash leaves.
    [​IMG]
    Ash leaf backside.
    [​IMG]
    Ash branch.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]




    Oak. I think it is Northern Red Oak.
    [​IMG]
    Oak trunk
    [​IMG]
    Oak trunk/branches
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Oak leaves
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Oak leaves backside
    [​IMG]
    Dried Oak leaves
    [​IMG]




    Tamarack leaves
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Tamarack Trunk/branches
    [​IMG]
    Tamarack Trunk
    [​IMG]

    The northern limit of sugar maple extends eastward from the extreme southeast corner of Manitoba, through central Ontario, the southern third of Quebec and all of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Within the United States the species is found throughout New England, New York, Pennsylvania, and the middle Atlantic States, extending southwestward through central New Jersey to the Appalachian Mountains, then southward through the western edge of North Carolina to the southern border of Tennessee. The western limit extends through Missouri into a small area of Kansas, the eastern one-third of Iowa, and the eastern two-thirds of Minnesota. A few outlier communities are found in northern Kansas, Georgia, and the Carolinas.

    Northern red oak is the only native oak extending northeast to Nova Scotia. It grows from Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec, to Ontario, in Canada; from Minnesota South to eastern Nebraska and Oklahoma; east to Arkansas, southern Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina. Outliers are found in Louisiana and Mississippi.

    White ash grows naturally from Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, to northern Florida in the east, and to eastern Minnesota south to eastern Texas at the western edge of its range.

    Tamarack has one of the widest ranges of all North American conifers. Its main range extends from Newfoundland and Labrador west along the northern limit of trees, and across the Continental Divide in northern Yukon Territory; then south in the Mackenzie River drainage to northeastern British Columbia and central Alberta; and east to southern Manitoba, southern Minnesota, southern Wisconsin, extreme northeastern Illinois, northern Indiana, northern Ohio, northern Pennsylvania, northern New Jersey, northern Connecticut, and Maine.

    Betula papyrifera (white birch)has a wide range. It is found in interior (var. humilus) and south-central (var. kenaica) Alaska and in all provinces and territories of Canada, except Nunavut, as well as the northern continental United States, south to Pennsylvania and Washington, with small isolated populations further south in mountains to North Carolina and Colorado. The most southerly stand in the Western United States is located in Lost Gulch in the City of Boulder Mountain Parks, an isolated Pleistocene relict that most likely reflects the southern reach of boreal vegetation into the area during the last Ice Ages.


    How did I do? :eek:
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2010
  19. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    I just want to say, borrowing a phrase from Sgt. Mac, this thread is

    "OUTStanding !!!"

    I am truly impressed with the information and the pictures to help us better recognize the trees around us.

    Thank you, one and all !
     
  20. swamprat

    swamprat Guide

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    Oh mighty G1, leaves are no problem and I accept the challenge (I will get to work on it tomorrow). I am glad you didn't make it exclusively based on twigs - my twig ID is really bad.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2010
  21. bmatt

    bmatt Guide

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    Thanks for arranging this challenge. It has inspired me to learn to identify as many trees and plants as I can. :)

    I got carried away and did 8. :D

    Softwoods: Scots pine (pinus sylvestris), Norway spruce (picea abies), common juniper (juniperus communis)

    Hardwoods: black/common alder (alnus glutinosa), silver birch (betula pendula)...continued in next reply...

    EDIT: Sorry about the background on these, guys. I did the hardwoods first and there was enough contrast with them. I realize the conifers don't show up as well as they could!
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2010
  22. bmatt

    bmatt Guide

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    ...downy birch (betula pubescens), Norway maple (acer platanoides) and European rowan (sorbus aucuparia)
     
  23. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Great job Buddy
     
  24. JustJoel

    JustJoel Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Well now, this was a pile of fun. Thanks for coming up with this although... I have this thing about calling Trek an elder.... :D

    Seriously guys, thanks for putting this up... it was worth it. I'll have to do some more research about uses but still a great exercise. I wound up doing like 12 trees today. Great stuff. Turns out I was far to close to poison Sumak today too... :eek:

    #1 Scot's Pine - Pinus sylvestris
    [​IMG]

    Planted in Ohio largely as a filler for reforestation, post logging.

    #2 Eastern Red Cedar - Juniperus virginiana
    [​IMG]

    If you can swing a dead cat in Southern Ohio without hitting a cedar tree, well, you're in a corn field. :D Iz has the best use video for this one I have seen. It's my reference. Check it out.

    #3 Chinese Chestnut - Castanea mollissima
    [​IMG]

    Following the Chestnut Blight in the late 19th century, these were imported to Ohio as a replacement and are largely ornimental. They do however, go wild every now and then... ;)

    #4 Eastern Redbud - Cercis canadensis
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Again, all over the place in Southern Ohio. I need to have a look at what it may be good for.

    #5 Pin Oak - Quercus palustris
    [​IMG]

    Had to look this one up... "Although widely distributed throughout Ohio, it probably is most abundant in the southwestern part of the state. The strong, close-grained woods warps and checks badly in drying and has limited uses. Various wildlife, including Wood Ducks, feed on the acorns."

    Looking forward to #2 in the series, men. Keep it up. :cool:

    Joel
     
  25. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    I have this problem with calling *myself* an elder.
    LMAO!
    PMZ
     
  26. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Yeah, well, my friend, you got there , so you are stuck with it ! :) ;)
     
  27. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    Persimmon Entry #1

    Common Persimmon
    Scientific name: Diospyros virginiana
    Habitat: Roadsides and hedgerows; moist soils in valleys.
    Range: Mostly Southeast USA. North to southern Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, and well into Missouri. West to eastern Nebraska, eastern Oklahoma, and eastern Texas. South to southern Florida.
    Notable features: No other tree has leaves with no teeth and alternate leaves, plus the notable thick brown bark that tends to crack into square-shaped chunks. Male and female trees have separate flowers, and only the female trees will produce fruit.
    Size: Rarely grows higher than 50 feet, with a trunk diameter of 6-12 inches.
    Uses: The fruit is very sweet and tasty, though if it is not ripe it is quite chalky and unpleasant. The wood is very hard and is suitable for making tool handles and bows. (Tree is a member of the ebony family.)

    Tree:
    [​IMG]

    Bark:
    [​IMG]

    Leaves: (Included my hand for size comparison)
    [​IMG]
     
  28. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Outstanding , Grits !

    Well done .
     
  29. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    Grits, I want to find some Persimmon.
    How should I go about locating some?

    Is there a particular type of soil it grows in?
    Thx,
    PMZ
     
  30. Pabloturtle

    Pabloturtle Scout Bushclass I

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    Tree #2

    Chokecherry (Prunus _____ )
    There are about a 100 different species of this large shrub to small tree throughout the U.S. and at least a couple different variations of each. Here in Idaho I am familiar with only a couple of the different species found. The most common of which is P.virginiana. Leaf shape and flower cluster shape are among some of the easiest way to differentiate. Commonly found in elevations above 3,000' on the end of the tree line and more open areas within the forests. It is not uncommon to find the tree or shrub growing in lower elevations, especially in the proximity of water drainage areas, creeks and rivers.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This tree was found at an elevation of 6,000'. Heavily distorted and mangled by the extreme snow depths in this location. Pretty confident by the slight variation of leaf shape and flower configuration this is a different species or variation.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Typical Prunus virginiana. The dense flower cluster emerging is the give away.This particular large shrub or small tree is from the foothills just outside of town before one enters the tree line. Elevation is about 3,100'- 3,400'. Not much snow load on this through the Winter so it grows without much distortion.

    For the original inhabitants of the area this plant was a major food source. Made into fruit cakes and a pemmican type cakes in large numbers before the onset of Winter.
    The plant was also used as a major medicine, not only by Natives, but by early settlers. There were several occasions during the L & C Exp. that Lewis relied heavily on it. Once the tree has gone to fruit it becomes an animal magnet. Another of the popular uses of Chokecherry was as a construction material. Large shrubs and bushes can be easily groomed & trimmed to provide for nice straight and strong limbs for arrow shafts. It can be easily worked for some basic basket frames. Below is a frame for a cradle board I made about 25 yrs ago when my son was born. The frame is Chokecherry. The mat is Willow. Have been thinking lately about making it into a pack frame by attaching a custom made bag, but I have enough packs and bags. For now I guess it will continue to collect dust.

    [​IMG]
     
  31. Creek Walker

    Creek Walker Guide

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    Find out if it has been reported growing in your state. If so click on the state and it will show which counties it has been reported in.

    Then download the fact sheet at the top of the page.

    http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=DIVI5

    Another fact sheet: Click on Horticulture and it will load a PDF which gives a little more detail than the previous link.

    http://www.dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=29

    Also there are other persimmons:

    http://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch?keywordquery=persimmon&mode=comname&submit.x=0&submit.y=0

    It has been my observation that persimmon will grow where ever the Possum poops. :D
     
  32. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    Trek,
    I have observed Persimmon largely in the Piedmont of NC in deciduous and pineland stands of varying degrees of moistness, and along hedgerows or edges of meadows/farmlands oar old fields.

    My four tree books reflect these observations.
     
  33. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    American Hornbeam (Entry #2)

    American Hornbeam (a.k.a. Blue Beech, Water Beech, Ironwood or Musclewood)

    Scientific name: Carpinus caroliniana
    Habitat: Moist rich soils along streams and river bottoms in deciduous woodlands. The tree usually grows prolifically in clusters and clumps.
    Range: All of Eastern USA except southern Florida. Border counties just west of the Mississippi river.
    Notable features: The bark is bluish gray and thin, like a beech, and looks like rippled muscle. The 2-4" elliptical to lanceolate leaves have strong alternate venation, and noticeable ragged serration along their edge.
    Size: Rarely grows higher than 30 feet, with a trunk diameter of no more than a foot; frequently it is seen as sapling size.
    Uses: The wood is very hard and is suitable for making tool handles, walking canes/staffs and bows, though it must be cured carefully so it does not split or check. The bark is very difficult to remove down past the cambium; many people like the look of semi-removed inner bark, as it appears like a natural camouflage.

    Trunk and bark:
    [​IMG][/IMG]

    Leaves (hand shown for scale):
    [​IMG][/IMG]
     
  34. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    American Holly (Entry #3)

    American Holly (a.k.a. White Holly)

    Scientific name: Ilex opaca
    Habitat: Moist yet well-drained soils in deciduous woodlands.
    Range: Prevalent in Southeastern USA except southern Florida. North along eastern seaboard to Massachusetts. Eastern West Virginia, to southeast Missouri and Arkansas, and eastern Texas.
    Notable features: The prickly leaves and red berry fruit cannot be mistaken for another tree. Although the tree is evergreen, it does produce a leaf crop that it drops each year. The bark is matte gray.
    Size: Can range to 60+ feet. Most specimens are smaller, to 30-40 feet. Trunks may range to 2 feet in diameter.
    Uses: The wood is very hard and is suitable for making tool handles, walking canes/staffs and bows. Due to the slow growth rate, it may be hard to find a sapling without branches. Some reports state that the leaves may be used to make tea, and that this tea was common in the South during the Civil War (probably due to not being able to get Oriental tea). The leaves contain no caffeine.

    Tree growing as understory plant. Note numerous branching on this sapling.
    [​IMG]

    Not unusual to see several clustered together. Note grey mottled bark (may have lichen fungus on it).
    [​IMG]

    Shiny leaves with obvious prickles.
    [​IMG]

    Another view of leaves.
    [​IMG]
     
  35. swamprat

    swamprat Guide

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    I hope better late than never applies here, it took me a few days to find a good representative sample of trees in Louisiana.

    Swamp Chestnut Oak - Quercus Michauxii

    Also known as the Cow Oak is a white oak with large, relatively sweet acorns which are readily eaten by livestock and deer. It is found in bottoms of the southern and central United States. Cow Oak is not as abundant as Nuttall Oak or some other species of oak, but it produces excellent sawtimber.
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    Hackberry or American Sugarberry - Celtis Laevigata
    The berries secrete a sweet sticky substance in the autumn that attracts millions of mealy-bugs. The mealy-bugs engorge themselves with the secretions and produce a dew-like substance of saccharine sweetness known as ghost rain. Many songbirds eat the sweetish fruits and help disperse the seeds.
    The wood is used mainly for furniture, athletic goods, crates, and plywood.

    This member of the Ulmaceae family is found from the southeastern Virginia to southern Florida, west to southwestern Texas and northeastern Mexico, and north to central Illinois. This species is also found in the northeastern areas of Mexico. It is found at elevations up to 2,000'.
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    Nuttall Oak - Quercus nuttallii

    Commonly known as Striped Oak, Nuttall Oaks are common in both uplands and bottomlands. Nuttall Oak is an important species because it produces high quality sawtimber.
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    Bitter Pecan - Carya aquatica

    Primarily a wildlife food (woodducks, squirrels, raccoons, black bears all eat hickory nuts); wood is not as useful as is pecan’s, due to brashness. However, it make excellent hardwood flooring and furniture. This species grows in extremely wet areas, but cannot survive permanent inundation.
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    American Elm – Ulmus Americana
    The wood of American elm is moderately heavy, hard, and stiff. It has interlocked grain and is difficult to split, which is an advantage for its use as hockey sticks and where bending is needed. It is used principally for furniture, hardwood dimension, flooring, construction and mining timbers, and sheet metal work. Some elm wood goes into veneer for making boxes, crates, and baskets, and a small quantity is used for pulp and paper manufacture.
    [​IMG]
     
  36. swamprat

    swamprat Guide

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    Come down south Trek, we have persimmon everywhere. It grows on the ridges and in the bottoms. My ex-father-in-law and I had a logging contract for Persimmon in the early 1980s and we harvested some of the largest Persimmon I have ever seen in the bottomland adjacent to the lower White River in Arkansas. The trees easily had two 16' logs each and ranged from 16" to 24" in diameter. They were all shipped to Japan for golf clubs.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2010
  37. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Outstanding Grits!!!! That was excellent post!!
     
  38. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    American Chestnut (Entry #4)

    American Chestnut
    Scientific name: Castanea dentata
    Habitat: Upland deciduous woodlands.
    Range: Much of Appalachia to Southern New York and along the northeastern seaboard states to southern Maine. West into eastern Ohio. South to north Georgia, north Alabama, and eastern Mississippi.
    Notable features: Leaves are 4-10” long, narrow and oblong, with widely-spaced teeth at the end of each of the straight and parallel veins, ending in a long tooth. The bark is gray to grayish brown, smooth, but not as smooth as a beech. The edible fruit looks like a green sea urchin: about 2-3 inches in diameter, with many sharp spines on the fruiting bur. The fruit opens in the fall, splitting into 3 or 4 sections and revealing 2-3 nuts inside with flat sides.
    Might be confused with: The only species it might be confused with is the Allegheny Chinkapin (Castanea pumila) looks similar in many ways, but is more of a large shrub-like tree with which has smaller leaves and fruit. The Allegheny Chinkapin’s range overlaps that of the Chestnut, but includes more of the southeastern seaboard states from southern Pennsylvania down into northern Florida and west to eastern Texas. The fruit of the Chinkapin is also edible.
    Comments: The Chestnut was once the dominant species in the eastern Appalachian hardwood forest. a Chestnut blight fungus that arose in the early 1900’s and wiped mature trees. The blight attacks underneath the bark, and splits it so that the trees do not usually survive past their sapling stage. The fruit is a forage crop for deer, elk and smaller animals and had developed into a commercial crop for humans before the blight. (“Chestnuts roasting on an open fire…”) The tree grows in western states as a cultivated tree where the blight has not been transported. Due to the large importance of this tree, much research is being conducted to interbreed Chinese and American Chestnuts to make a blight-resistant variety. See the American Chestnut Foundation http://www.acf.org/
    Size: Rarely grows larger than a sapling before the blight kills it. Mature trees (pre-blight) would grow to 60-100+ feet.
    Uses: Before the blight, the wood was prized for its durability and is rot resistant, and was used for furniture, and buildings. The wood was also the prime source for tannin.

    NOTE: I was both surprised and thrilled to find this tree they are so rare, so I was extra careful in my identification (and would still not be surprised if an expert told me that this was some sort of Chinese-American cross-breed). I have never seen one larger than a 4-inch sapling. I will report this to the country agricultural extension agent to see if they are aware that a blight resistant tree is living here. But I will collect the nuts from this tree in the fall and test them out, that's for sure! And I'll save some for planting, too...

    Leaves:
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    Bark:
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    Fruit:
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    Year-old Fruit bur (no nuts inside)
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    Blight splitting the bark (lower area of the trunk...about 8-10 feet up the trunk in this picture)
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  39. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Excellent Grits! Way to go Buddy
     
  40. Trekon86

    Trekon86 Guest

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    Wow!
    I know there's a couple of those surviving round here but most oftentimes it's just stumps which sprout shoots for a few weeks, then die:(
    PMZ
     
  41. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    Yeah, I'm floored that I would find it in suburbia (!).
     
  42. Grits

    Grits Guide

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    Mockernut Hickory (#5)

    Mockernut Hickory

    Scientific name: Carya tomentosa
    Habitat: Moist upland deciduous woodlands.
    Range: Most of Eastern and midwest US except counties bordering Great Lakes and New England.
    Notable features: Leaves are pinnately compound with 7 or 9 leaflets; leaflets have fine serrations, have hairy undersides, and are lanceolate or elliptical in shape.
    The bark is gray to grayish brown, and is ridged with apparent interlacing lines.
    The edible nuts are encased in a husk that splits in 4 or 5 sections.
    Might be confused with: Numerous other hickories. Possible Poison Ivy hanging by vines in tree (see pictures).
    Size: Grows to 60-80 feet, and 24 inches in diameter.
    Uses: Nut meat is prized by humans and many other animals. Thew wood makes excellent tools, furniture, and bows.

    Leaves and nut husks (from a squirrel eating mound).
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    Edges of leaves
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    Bark
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    Nuts on Tree
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    Poison Ivy (Rhus radicans) hanging in tree! Beware!
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    Poison Ivy vine on tree (Note "Hairy=Scary" appearance)
    [​IMG][/IMG]
     
  43. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder Staff Member Administrator Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II Bushclass Instructor

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    Outstanding Grits!!
     
  44. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    A reminder to all , the challenge goes until the end of July ! We have had some really outstanding reports, and I would like to see more members answer the challenge before the end of the month.

    Thanks for the response !
    G1
     
  45. superduder

    superduder Tinder Gatherer

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    I'm in,
    Been meaning to I.D. the trees arount the property anyhow.
    J
     
  46. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Just over a week to go ! Let there be tree reports ! :)
     
  47. Rusty Shackelford

    Rusty Shackelford Tracker

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    South Central Oklahoma

    Eastern Redbud
    Description: Tree grows to 30ft tall. Abundance of purple flowers in the spring. Large, heart shaped leaves. Bright green foliage in summer turning to bright yellow in the fall. Bunches of long seed pods hang from limbs summer through fall.
    Habitat: Occurs in forest undergrowth in moist, rich woods, along banks of streams, in ravines, in open rocky woods and abandoned farmland.
    Uses: Bark was made into a tea to treat whooping cough. Cold infusion of root and inner bark was used to treat fever and congestion.
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    Hackberry
    Description: Medium sized tree reaching up to 85ft. Leaves are alternate, simple, long ovate withevenly serrated edges. The fruit is a small quarter inch berry. They are green turning to red and purple. Smooth grey bark with wart like ridges.
    Habitat: Warm temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, southern europe, eastern asia and south america. Grows well in alkaline soil. Very adaptable.
    Uses: Berrys are edible.

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    Honey Locust
    Description: This short lived tree can grow to 100ft. Leaves are pinnately compound in older trees and bipennantly compound in younger trees. The leaves are 1"-2" and bright green turning yellow in the fall. Stroongly scented, cream colored flowers form in clusters around the base of the leaf axils in the spring. The seed pods are generaly 8" to 15" long and mature between September and October. Commonly have thorns 1" to 8" long out of the branches and trunk. These may be single or branched into several points. They may form bunches of thorns on the trunk.
    Habitat: Found scattered in the east central U.S. from Pennsylvania westward to South Dakota and south to central Texas. East to Alabama and north to western Maryland.
    Uses: The pulp on the inside of the seed pods is edible unlike the black locust which is poisonous.The pulp is sweet and can be ferminted into beer.

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    BlackJack Oak

    Description:Short nearly black trunk divides into many dense, contorted limbs with dead branches persistant. Can grow to 50ft. Leaves are blade shaped with a narrow rounded basebroadening towards the tip.Blades shallowly lobed usually with 3 lobes.Glossy green leaves turn red in the fall.Acorns up to 3/4" long and 1/2" wide at the cap.
    Habitat: Eastern US except Forida, Extreme north and the Mississippi valley. Able to survive in poor soil.This Oak along with the Post Oak form the cross timbers region of Oklahoma and Texas.
    Uses: Great firewoo. It burns hot but is very dense and will dull chainsaws quickly. Indians used the bark for dysentary. Acorns are edible.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    This is a gall that was all over this tree. It is made by a Cynipid wasp.It lays its eggs in the leaf and plant hormones form this "Oak Apple" around them. These are the size of a golf ball and spongy with a red liquid inside. When the larvae is big enough it burrows out. There used to be a market for these. They used them in die for paper money.
    [​IMG]

    Post Oak

    Description: Grows to 100 ft. Trunk is grey to light reddish brown. Leaf blades variable 3" to 5" or longer. Wavy margined to deep lobed. Up to 4 lobes per side. Acorns3/4" to 1and1/4" long. No fringe on the cup.
    Habitat : MA to central Florida. West toKansas through Texas. Dry upland ridges and prarie edges. The most common oak found in Texas.
    Uses:Acorns are edible. Commercially marketed as white oak.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  48. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Thanks, Rusty. Those are all native to my area as well. The Cross timbers region is an interesting biome. We get Cedar, Mesquite, Post Oak , Black Jack Oak, and Hackberry all withing the 100 acres or so of our place.
     
  49. Rusty Shackelford

    Rusty Shackelford Tracker

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    All of these pictures are in my back yard. I didn't know what the hackberry was until today. I always thought it was somekind of elm. Good idea for a challenge. Thanks.

    I attempted to resize the pictures but it didn't work. I guess you have to have it set before you download pictures.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2010
  50. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    IIRC there is an option when you upload them to Photobucket that will resize them to the preferred 640x 480 format.
     
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