Favorite backpack for camping/hiking

Discussion in 'Backpacking' started by Shane, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. Shane

    Shane Tracker

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    I'm looking to get into backpack camping/hiking and wanted to know what are some good bags or what people prefer.
     
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  2. Red Wing

    Red Wing Guide

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    Pros will tell you your pack is the last thing to get, based on your cumulative gear. See what ends up working for you as far as gear and youll figure out best how to carry it.

    That said. My Trail Company just put their rendition of the Golite Jam on sale. You NEED UL kit for it though, doesnt like heavy loads at all. But it does cinch at the bottom turning it into a good daypack too.

    Osprey exos is probably the most bang for your buck and universally liked by backpackers and would be my suggestion as a jumping off point.

    Id try to keep whatever pack it is under 3lbs and thats still kind of heavy. The big 3. Pack bag and shelter. Keep all those light and youre pretty much money.

    For me, i want large side pockets, large mesh back pocket, load lifters, some kind of frame support and no lid or floating lid but hate them sewn to the pack. Good hip belt is a must as well.
     
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  3. Jasonacraft

    Jasonacraft Scout Bushclass I

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    I completely agree with Red Wing, cumulative gear for size first. Take all your stuff. Put it in a cardboard box, squish that box and measure it. That'll get you the cubic inches needed for pack sizing and weight.

    Check out ULA and Hyperlight Mountain Gear, I'm a big fan of both.
     
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  4. Shane

    Shane Tracker

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    Thanks for the info guys ill get all my stuff first then choose a bag that i will like and hopefully fit everything in.
     
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  5. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    Good advice, "gear first, then something to hold it."

    I used to like a Kelty Trekker 4300... as I got better at this woods thing and started carrying less, I ultimately got lighter packs... I have 4 that I use regularly. If I'm carrying a lot of my tools, or for one place where I actually schlep firewood in, I like my German or Norwegian military packs... they're a little heavy for "backpacking" though, and they usually are for trips under a mile. (the firewood thing is at my semi-permanent campsite, 1/4 mile walk). For other trips, it's either a GoLite Gust or a GoLite Jam70. I tried a ULA Circuit/Conduit (can never remember which one... the really light one of the two) but didn't like them. The Gust is 20oz, and for a bare bones trip. The Jam is more like 30oz, but has a stiffer backsheet, compression straps that pull the load closer to my back, and belt pockets that are handy for some trips (GPS, snacks, camera, etc). I use it when the load is a little heavier and the trail a little shorter. The Gust is also my favorite canoe pack.
     
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  6. Gruxxx

    Gruxxx Guide Bushclass I

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    For backpacking where I'll be spending the night(s), I like my ULA Circuit. It's very comfortable and light, and a great size for moderate temps. In the winter, it is a little small though to fit bulkier items, but I manage. For all day hikes, I like my Kestrel 38. It holds my cooking gear, water bottles, some bushcraft gear, and my heavy wool Boreal Shirt just about perfectly. For short hikes, and particularly summer hikes, I still use my 20+ year old Mountainsmith Tyrol, but only because it's been bombproof and I haven't found a good excuse to replace it with something newer.
     
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  7. Shane

    Shane Tracker

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    Ill have to check all these backpacks out here soon as i wont be buying anything for awhile, but im wanting one for 2-7 day use overnight camping/hiking/bushcraft stuff, something light enough but can hold enough stuff to where i could camp out for 7 days at most comfortably. @Gruxxx i was looking at the kestrel would that be a good bag for multiple overnight camping/hiking? The ULA Circuit bag looks really nice.
     
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  8. Jasonacraft

    Jasonacraft Scout Bushclass I

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    The Circuit is awesome, but has a 20lb weight limit. The Catalyst is bigger. No much heavier, but can take up to 40lbs (which may be closer to that 7 day mark). Enjoy the journey!
     
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  9. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    Your gear for 2 or 7 days shouldn't be much different. The difference is 2lbs of food per day... so a 15lb base weight for pack/shelter/cooking gear/sleeping bag/clothing/raingear shouldn't change. Add 14lbs of food and 2lbs per qt of water (most people like to carry 1 or 2), and you're at +/-32lbs the first day, 2lbs less thereafter. That's when the roll top closure on some of those UL packs starts to make sense.

    Take a look at the ULA Conduit while you're looking at the Circuit and Catalyst... it's ULA's heaviest-load pack, iirc.

    The other thing you must do is make an excel spreadsheet, weigh every item to the gram or fraction of an ounce on a digital scale, and add it up... all of a sudden, you'll see that there's a real difference between carrying 2 platypus quart bottles weighing an ounce each and a pair of nalgenes at 8oz each... 2oz vs a pound... that sort of thing adds up, and the spreadsheet shows you where. 11oz wood stove, or 4.5oz pocket rocket (oh wait... what about the 14oz fuel canister?) You get the idea.

    There's a couple good threads on ultralight backpacking around here. I'm too lazy to find them for you, and you can do it yourself anyway... but read them, and how different people do things... you'll figure out what works for you, and what doesn't...

    @Forestree and I camp together often enough for me to say we have some pretty different ideas about things. I'm more of either a hammocker (in summer) or Whelen/Miller (open leanto/fire) wannabee (in winter), while he prefers a tent or tarp and sleeps on the ground almost all the time (I think he has a hammock, but I don't remember. I don't go out much in the summer). He wears leather boots. I wear lighter shoes. He's gotta have good coffee in the morning. I drink tea. I'm a chubby old office worker. He's a younger-than-me outdoor worker with legs and a back. I like a tripod to boil water over the fire. He likes to wait for the coals and sits his pot right on them. But I learn something from him every time I go out. Most importantly, we have fun.
     
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  10. Tiwaz

    Tiwaz Scout

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    Surplus ALICE pack with frame and the Hellcat mod. Works for me. But backpacks are plentiful and varied. Find the one that works for you. Go to a good outfitter and get your torso measured and try some packs out. You'll get a much better frame of reference.
     
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  11. ouroboros

    ouroboros Tracker

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    I'll second this. Reasonably priced, lightweight but tough enough (for backpacking/trail hiking) and 48 liters is a generous amount of room if you pack / choose your gear right.

    I have and use an Exos for most of my 3 season on-trail-type backpacking trips... I use a Fjallraven Kaipak 58L for winter and/or off trail stuff.
     
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  12. Red Wing

    Red Wing Guide

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    Truth be told, I use a ULA Ohm 2.0.

    Its my grail pack.

    The way ULAs carry the load is like Voodoo.

    If youre barrel chested like me, you can get the S straps.

    Comfort on a whole other level.

    Worth the extra 50.00 to get it in my eyes over the Exos but lots of people love their Exos too.
    The trail dont lie.
     
  13. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Tracker

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    That "my trail company 70l jam pack" being on sale for 119.99. That's a steal. I don't think you're gonna find a better deal. I just bought a ULA catalyst and I think it will be awesome too, but it was a bit more than 119.99.
    I've heard osprey exos 58 is sweet too.
     
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  14. Shane

    Shane Tracker

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    @Seeker yea i plan on hammocking in the summer alot an maybe ill adventure out in the winter ( i hate the cold so im kinda of a bitch when it comes to it haha ) Ill deffinatly check those ULA's out while im at it. Honestly ill probably be like your friend and use the coals maybe bring a small cast iron pan with me unless i can find something lighter and almost as durable for cooking on I also like to drink tea over coffee. ( i like using my knife and the wood around me to build fires and cook with ) I dont have a scale but i might be able to figure that stuff out. This is very true Tiwaz. I appreciate all this information and feed back fellas thanks!
     
  15. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    A 6" Paderno sheet steel pan is what you're looking for, vs cast iron... lots of love for it here on the forum.
     
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  16. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Tracker

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    I'd like to put a little spin on this thread, since you mentioned that you're new to camping.
    I'm going to talk about how I like to pack a backpack. and keep things dry.

    First and throughout, I waterproof and organize.
    Most modern back packs have a waterproof coating, but as wet weather persists having multiple layers of waterproofing and divisions in your gear can prove indispensable.

    The main culprit of my gear getting wet when I camp in the rain, is my wet hands trying to access parts of my gear, so having some division is nice.
    The main compartment gets its "rucksack liner" trash bag, then your clothes and sleeping bag each get their own separate trash bag.
    Tarp/tent does not go inside the rucksack liner.
    Ounce for ounce, I've found that plastic trash bags are not only cheaper, but also lighter weight than fancy dry bags. I've always used regular trash bags as a general ruck sack liner because they are always in my kitchen, but I hear that trash compacter bags are more durable.
    Ziploc bags in the 1 gallon, 1 qt, and 1 cup sizes are pretty tough and great for subdividing smaller kits too.
    I own a few store bought ultralight nylon dry/ compression sacks, but plastic does work.

    Having all your equipment divided up into kits and categories makes its easier to access it all. And if things get nasty having the multiple bags gives the option to separate them from your clean gear and seal them, or air them out.

    If I'm wet and its raining, I have a little routine that works for me.
    1) I pitch my big tarp solidly
    2) I put down my ground cloth
    3) I pull out a small camp towel and dry off my pack and ground cloth
    4) Then I use the camp towel to dry off my poncho lay it next to damp pack.
    5) I pullout my clothes bag (don't open yet) set it on dry ground cloth
    6)strip my wet clothes, wring them out, them set them on top of my poncho.
    7) dry myself off, then I dry off the ground cloth with the small camp towel
    8) then once I'm dry and the ground cloth is dry I will open the clothes bag and put on dry clothes.
    9)only after I'm wearing dry clothes will I access my sleep system.
    10)I try to find a way to drape the wet clothes out so that they can get a lot of air, and drip dry...
    11) burning a candle can help reduce humidity a little
     
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  17. ra2bach

    ra2bach Guide

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    Shane, if you're just starting out I'd recommend you start in the middle of the road with time tested and well respected equipment.

    if you're not attempting big miles (15-25/day), you'd be better off with a popular 60-65L pack like an Osprey or others that have been refined over the years to meet most people's needs. even though they may weigh a bit more, they have comforts and conveniences that dedicated ultralight long-distance hikers forego.

    It's not that the light/ultralight packs are bad, but they are pretty narrow focus and have a learning curve. they are a compromise to achieve their light weight and usually what you give up is features, durability, and comfort.

    In any case, the MOST important factor in how a pack performs is fit. try to find a store with a good reputation and have them fit you. once you get some miles under your boots, you'll start to develop preferences, and if you decide you do want to thru-hike a trail, you'll know enough about your needs and style that you won't have to ask...
     
  18. Edgeman

    Edgeman Scout

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    I have a Deuter 65+10 and it's very comfortable. It is also well built. Was so impressed, will buy more Deuter packs. I paid about $135 for a green one on Amazon about a year ago, while another retailer was selling the same pack (in blue) for $235. Keep your eyes open for deals!

    A lot of people also like Osprey packs, as well as some store branded packs (LL Bean, REI, etc.). Probably best to try one on first to see if it fits you correctly. Find what you like, then shop for deals.

    You also need to decide how you will use it. Are you looking for an overnight pack, a weekend pack, or something that will hold enough stuff for a week? That will determine the size.

    There are a lot of great options today, so the odds are you'll choose a winner.
     
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  19. Luafcm

    Luafcm Scout

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    Chinook Lifeforce pack is my fav. It's a 40L main back with two zip off 15L side packs for a total 70L capacity. Also has built in rain flys, hydration compartment, and heavily padded straps and back. It's real comfy and versitile IMO.

    I like that I can pack the side pouches with food, clothing, or other gear that could be left behind during a day hike from camp. This really makes it great for hiking/camping/whatever I'm up to. It has mesh pockets against the main pack under the side packs. This means you can slide a rifle down in between and it holds in place without slipping. Works great for a full size axe or bucksaw too.

    I also like that it's not in some loud neon eyesore colour like blaze yellow or bright baby blue. Nothing worse than a bunch of brightly coloured crap loading down the scenery in the woods.

    I don't think these ones are still made, but it looks more or less the same as the snugpak rocketpak.

    20170313_142853.png
    2017_0219_07544400.jpg
    20150605_120652.jpg
     
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  20. Shane

    Shane Tracker

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    Could you reccomend a place to buy one off or a place to buy one at im seeming to have trouble finding that pan.
     
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  21. Jasonacraft

    Jasonacraft Scout Bushclass I

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  22. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    I think I got mine from our very own Ben's Bushcraft Outfitters... I have this one.
    http://www.bensbackwoods.com/paderno-carbon-skillet-baking-pan-6-5-8/

    They make bigger ones. The picture shows it with a special pot gripper. I fry over coals, not a fire. Push it over the coals with a stick, pull it out with a stick. no mess, no fuss, no splattering grease, woodsmoke, or heat.
     
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  23. petey091

    petey091 Scout

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    What pack and what size all depends on what you plan to do with it. During the spring , summer and fall I am doing weekend backpacking trips along the AT. This summer I will spend 12 days backpacking in New Mexico and in 2018 a summer trip to the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area. I use a Golite 80 Quest. It weighs close to three pounds. It's important to understand the context of any recommendations that you are given. This is the backpacking section of the forum but everyone has their own interpretation of what that means. A person who carries a fifty pound pack four miles into the woods on Friday afternoon and sets up a camp for the weekend and walks out Sunday afternoon will have different needs than a guy who plans to cover 25 miles the same weekend. But , each guy calls himself a backpacker. Both guys are right, you just have to understand the context of their recommendations.
     
  24. ra2bach

    ra2bach Guide

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    thank you for saying that. as happens in so many of these gear recommendation threads is people give a sincere answer of what works for them but may not be what the OP needs.

    OP, if all you want to do is general hiking, then a general pack of 60-75L from a good company that is fit to the user will satisfy 99 44/100% of all your needs. when you get some miles on it, you'll know better what you 'prefer' and can move on from there, if indeed you ever need to...
     
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  25. ra2bach

    ra2bach Guide

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    do you know this 'My Trail Company' pack? I'm using the old model of SMD 65L, which is really more like 55L, and I would like something with just a little more capacity for cold weather. it's a fine 39oz pack. it's got a hard stay so the weight is transferred well, and it's got good waist belt and shoulder straps. I'd say it's comfortable with 35-40lbs

    I'd like to give it a try but a lot of these light weight packs give up a hard back-stay and begin to feel like an attention-starved monkey clinging to you as the day wears on...
     
  26. Red Wing

    Red Wing Guide

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    I was using their Golite jam at the prodding of Adam from Hammock Gear.

    At the time, i was much more.. traditional.. in my approach and philosphies.

    I had the same issues with the monkey on your back deal, also it was frameless in 50l. It was love hate.

    Looking back however, i find my gear and philosophies more in line with this pack and regret letting it go. I especially liked the hip belt and its contour.

    Golite made a heavier duty pack that I cant for the life of me remember what it was, but if theyve married that suspension with Jam materials, which is what it sounds like they did on the 70l, then thats a win. At 119.00 its definitely worth the roll if youre in the market.
     
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  27. ra2bach

    ra2bach Guide

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    Gaaaaah! yeah... at this point I don't really need all that capacity but it's too good of a deal to pass up if it works, know what I mean?..

    I'm looking for a new pack because my Six Moons Design pack is just thiiiiiiis much too small when carrying 5 days of food and my hammock gear with two synthetic quilts. and because, hey, I want a new pack...

    :4:
     
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  28. Red Wing

    Red Wing Guide

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    Lmao you sound like me. I can ALWAYS talk myself into a new pack. My wife HATES it lol. Its fantastic.

    Yeah, thats what i really miss.about the pack is the cinch system. Two small loops of cord out by the ice axe loops clip into 2 plastic hooks at the bottom of the frame sheet. Actually looked great when I carried my jam as such. Sturdy regardless of how much I packed. In daypack mode mind you. But it nips and tucks and keeps it xlean looking, just smaller.

    Then you have the roll top.

    This could be a fantastic one pack option at a crazy good price AND weight. Deals like that arent too common
     
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  29. Jasonacraft

    Jasonacraft Scout Bushclass I

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    LoL
    I'm still carrying my big ol catalyst simply because it's still light and I'm cheap. I could easily move into an ohm during warm weather, but, eh...it works. Yeah capacity!
     
  30. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    my buddy recently purchased the 50L from my trail co; he plans on using it for the upcoming Bob Marshall Open- should have a pretty good idea after a 100+ miles in 3-ish days :)
     
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  31. Headache

    Headache Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I tend to be out hunting, or scouting most of the time.

    I am hard on equipment.

    I prefer Badlands packs to all other brand i have used and seen used by others.
    I love their design, strength, comfort, and durability. Pricewise, they are middle of the road. I have abused my original Diablo pack for what seems like half a million miles, and I have even sent it back twice to get zippers repaired. Always comes back fit as a fiddle! Lifetime warranty and best customer service in the biz.

    That being said, I do like the eberlestock brand pretty well.

    My humble 2 cents worth.
     
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  32. outbackwack

    outbackwack Tracker

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    I prefer using a kitchen trash bag because it is of similar size and shape as a pack. Take the whole thing to the store and stuff it into packs.

    How long will you be out hiking and what weight will you be carrying? That will determine size, then go from there. I really like Osprey packs as well, and am actually considering buying the Aether AG 60, although their material is not the most durable around. But their suspension system and comfort are great. If I had the money I'd go with Arc'teryx. Bombproof and well designed, but really overpriced. Have fun!
     
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  33. westernb

    westernb Tracker

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    My favorite is the old school BFM from Camelbak. It's extremely comfortable and durable. I can't vouch for the new version though.

    images.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2017
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  34. Doc.

    Doc. Scout

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    IMG_0416.JPG Shane, with regard to this thread's title, I'd like to add another variable in the equation, an essential one IMHO. Find the pack with which you can develop a reliable and long-term relationship. The old North Face on the left and I have been tramping all over the world since 1979. She's never failed me. The smaller Beaner Continental ruck on the right is a potential replacement for my now retired 1974 waxed canvas ruck. If the continental doesn't prove a reliable companion, she'll go the way of other fad and throwaway bags. A good bag will give you the same secure dynamic as "this old house". Doc.
     
  35. Avohei

    Avohei Supporter Supporter

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    I'm super new to all of this. Had a bit of trials and stuff. Mostly I've done car camping at a campground which I still do today. I've yet to go backpacking/camping outside of a campground cause I am still testing things and working on my gear and other items. My goal is to get everything into one bag. The bag I chose is a 5.11 72hr pack with 2894 cu inches space and weighs under 2lbs and built like a tank!
    [​IMG](not a pic of mine)

    It has a ton of pockets, pouches, compartments to put things in which I like. It's not for everyone but it fits me nicely. I know exactly where things are in it. For example in that pic there is a top pocket in front where I keep my hygiene stuff (tbrush, deodorant, soaps). The side pockets: one has my electronics (charger, camera, tripod, selfie stick, batteries) and the other a 32oz nalgene with a bit of room to spare.

    I could go on and probably take pictures for examples but that's not what the thread is intended I think.

    Still a lot of work to do but right now I can fit everything I need for a good trip right out of it. Plus I hang walking sticks and an axe on it. The sticks are for obviously walking as well as for my tarp setup when I don't have trees. It's comfy on my back as I'm 6'3 190lbs and fits me well. The next goal is to remove aspects of it (ie: cutting off things that are not needed) to make it as light as it can be.

    Been considering buying a new pack but I can't get myself to pull the trigger on that purchase yet as this does quite well for me at this time. :)
     
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  36. M.Hatfield

    M.Hatfield Supporter Supporter

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    One of several Mystery Ranch packs serves as my best day pack. Likely my older 3-Day Assault Bag has the most miles on it and is basically bombproof.
     
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  37. Ranger99

    Ranger99 Tracker

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    some will probably pop a cork, but you might consider hitting
    up some of the second hand stores and goodwill stores for old
    packs. i have 2 good keltys out in the shed that i got for near
    nothing. the good part (to me) is that you have a good welded
    aluminum frame that you can use to carry anything that your
    spine will take, or as light as you want. you don't have to use
    the packsack that came with it. you can tie down a load and
    strap on a daypack on top of it.
    i used one of these for a lot of years to carry a bow and treestand
    and a days worth of goods way back into the woods.
     
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  38. Ranger99

    Ranger99 Tracker

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    i should also add that the old military alice pack is
    about as durable as anything sold, the real surplus
    ones, not the new made chinese ones. i have 2
    mediums i use without frames.
     
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  39. ROCK6

    ROCK6 Scout

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    Some good feedback. The key, as already mentioned, is gather up all your gear (make sure you cover all the essentials); weight it and size it. Find a pack that has an adequate frame and suspension to comfortably handle both the weight and volume of your gear. For those just getting started, I highly recommend making your way to a competent outdoors store that will fit you properly for a pack. Pack fit is the most critical aspect. Once you find out how a pack is supposed to fit, you can shop around for deals on packs that have the right torso length with the features you know you need to ensure it not only fits but is comfortable.

    Osprey packs are probably the most common I see on the trail and for good reason. They have some quality designs, good features, and solid suspension systems. I’ve used expensive packs (Kifaru, Mystery Ranch, Arc’Teryx) and more mainstream packs (Osprey, Gregory, etc.), and they all work well for specific needs. I would stick with backpacking designed packs, simply for the weight savings.

    Volume is important. Too much and most packs won’t do well with smaller loads. Tool little and you end up having stuff hanging off the outside of your pack. Comfort ratings for maximum weight limits are your first concern, but volume is the second once you find out the most comfortable pack sized to fit you. As you upgrade gear, you’ll find you can get by with lighter and smaller volume pack.

    My main three-season pack is a ULA Circuit. It’s about as perfect a pack as I’ve found for my backpacking needs. I can keep full loads under 30 pounds…warmer months that can be as many as 7-days, or fewer days during winter months due to bulkier insulation needs. My base weight (minus food, fuel and water) is around 14 pounds, so the majority of my gear is pretty light and compact. If your gear is a little bulkier and heavier, I would recommend the Catalyst model which has more volume and can carry loads up to 40 pounds. I plan to pick up a Catalyst for winter loads or planned backpacking trips where you need a bear canister.

    ROCK6
     
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  40. Back Off

    Back Off Scout

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    I get multi use out of mine. I have the eberlestock Blue Widow with a bow bucket as I wanted something that could also haul quarters of game if I get out west again. I couldnt afford better or I would as getting a pack with functioning load lifters customized to your torso is really a plus. The pack I have isnt light but when its on my back I dont notice it much even with heavy gear. I can haul everything I need without an issue and its tough as can be. I plan on getting my son the same pack. Cell 1920.jpg
     
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  41. MountainLark

    MountainLark Tracker

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    I had the same awesome Kelty trekker for nearly 20 years but the frame got mangled by a well-intentioned person who was trying to help me re-assemble it after an airplane flight. They forced it and *SNAP*. :( :( So I found another one from a slightly earlier vintage (1988) and it's been serving me well. The only think I can complain about it is the fact that the top flap stays connected via cords; I might have to mod this as it drives me crazy getting stuff out.

    But yeah, that Kelty saw a lotta miles. :)


    : Screen Shot 2017-07-11 at 11.50.26 AM.png
     
  42. TattooBlade

    TattooBlade Supporter Supporter

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    Love my Mystery Ranch gear. Pricey. But will last you forever.
     
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  43. mjf

    mjf Scout

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    I normally use a ULA Circuit and it is a great light weight pack. I recently bought a Zpacks Arc Haul and I love it. It is a external frame pack that weighs only 24 oz. It is super comfy and carries the weight of my gear with ease. You do need light weight gear to go along with this pack.
     
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  44. caoutdoorsman

    caoutdoorsman Scout

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    Jansport is a good brand for the warranty, there are lots of nice makers though so its pretty hard to go wrong.

    A nylon 55L internal frame pack is a good choice for day pack and as a backpacking rig, they're light enough to serve as a daypack but have enough storage capacity for backpacking.
    Don't get something with a ton of Molle webbing, it adds a lot of weight and frequently snags on things.

    I'd recommend going to your local sporting goods store and trying on a bunch of packs, and see which is the most comfortable. Everyone is a built a bit differently, so what someone else uses might not work for you.
     
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  45. Red Ochre

    Red Ochre Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I love the Swedish M39 rucksacks.
    For me it's the ultimate grab and go pack that does it all.
    I've had many bags over the years and this one is my all time favorite.

    [​IMG]
     
  46. Red Wing

    Red Wing Guide

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    Watcha got in there? That looks like a nice xompact old school kit
     
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  47. Red Ochre

    Red Ochre Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thanks to Photophucket I had to use a stock picture...
    I'll get some updated ones of my M39 next trip out.
     
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  48. medic16

    medic16 Scout

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    Currently running a Kifaru mountain rambler on a Kifaru bikini frame. I really like this set-up. Extremely comfortable. Very versatile. I was lucky to get it used at a great price.
     
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  49. charlesmc2

    charlesmc2 Scout

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    Sort of been wondering if/when external frame packs would come back into vogue. They offer great flexibility in the sense you can strap stuff on the outside and they are cooler. I've still got my mid 80's Kelty Tioga. I've had a couple of internal frame packs since but I'm still for of the old Kelty.
     
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  50. slowtaknow

    slowtaknow Tracker

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    My kelty red cloud 90 works for me, i don't always fill it up nor do i need to, i have been trying to down size to my walmart bag that looks like a book bag but bigger and i believe better made. I will try to find a image or link in a minute. Not at home. No luck on image, just a basic book bag with more room and sinch straps on sides with bottle holders. Decent pack but if i get my hands on an assault pack it will be replaced i think.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
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