Finally got it out and on the water...

Discussion in 'Paddling' started by OutnBacker, Jun 18, 2019.

  1. OutnBacker

    OutnBacker Guide

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    With the major home owner projects completed, I finally got the Grumman 18 out for the first time since switching the sail kit over from the G17. father's Day with my son, launching at the Port of Everett, low tide and a light wind from the west. I would have preferred a dropping tide so that it wouldn't turn on us , but we got there at the wrong time. I figured the wind would be steady from its direction so what the heck...

    Wrong.

    The wind turned and came from the south - along with the incoming tide on the river, which made it impossible to sail back to the launch. With the current running abut 3mph, and the gentle wind puffing less, we were cutting like hell on wheels across the current, but drifting UP stream at the same time.

    And, stupidly, I decided to leave the motor at home since there would be two of us, both strong paddlers. No problem, right?

    I can report that as of today, there is no part of my anatomy that does not hurt. The good part was that we kept to the inside of the river curvature (less current) and were able to use the paddles to pole across the log boom flats. With all the paddling and poling to keep moving downstream, I think we put in about 10 miles worth of effort to go but 3. No let up or we'de lose ground instantly. I'm getting old.

    Anyway, here is the machine with my son, ready to launch. No pics of the action because it was all hands on deck as we worked out the new set up. Several things to adjust this week and I'll be ready for a season of terrorizing the tourists.

    Grumman 18
    0616191316a.jpg

    As a comparison, below is a previous pic of the Grumman 17. The entry and departure lines on the 18 are much finer and longer than the 17, making it a potentially faster boat for any mode of power. The stems have less rise and recurve, too, which lessens wind resistance. The actual hull depth is the same at 12-1/2". With about 2" extra beam and that foot more length, the 18 is a more suitable canoe for this type of conversion.

    Other changes made include the increased strut spread to 6ft from 4ft, yielding more space in the middle of the boat, where I mostly live. The pontoons are the new 10 footers I made and proved on the 17 last year. They work like a dream, and are much lighter and longer than the old ones on the 17.

    So, next time out, I won't even think about leaving the Honda at home.

    Grumman 17...
    Sep24-2016-1 - Copy.JPG
     
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  2. Robedsubset

    Robedsubset Scout

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    Is that the 2.3 Honda? If so, how do you like it? I’ve been looking hard at one for my Grummans.
     
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  3. OutnBacker

    OutnBacker Guide

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    It's a 2008 Honda 2hp.

    I have mixed feelings about it, frankly. While it's a great motor - no issues whatsoever - it is definitely not a troller for fishing off a canoe. Mostly, it's a mis-match because the canoe is too narrow and does not present enough drag to keep the speed down to trout trolling speeds of .8 to 1.2mph. If the engine was mounted to a wide dinghy - maybe it would work better. But, it's not a troller, really. It was designed as a an auxiliary motor for a tender or inflatable - not actually for fishing.

    Also, since it has a centrifugal clutch, like a minibike, if you try to set the rpm low enough to troll, the prop just goes in to neutral.

    You have noticed that I use outriggers. This allows me to mount the heavy Honda without thinking about balance. The Honda is 34lbs and ALL of it is very high up. The powerhead is both large and noisy, and as a one-lunger, it vibrates quite a bit. Again, not a motor for trying to sneak past fish. I use an electric when I have my line in the water.

    All that said, if you want supreme quality, reliability, and smokeless gas performance - get one. For moving the boat up to about 6mph, it works great. NOTE: Canoes in general cannot go much faster than that - maybe 8mph tops, before they begin to rise in the bow and sink in the stern. They do not plane, being displacement hulls.

    I'll try and post a vid from my channel showing the rig in full motion on a lake at 3/4 throttle...
     
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  4. OutnBacker

    OutnBacker Guide

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    Okay, here's that vid. The canoe is my just sold Grumman 17, and the pontoons are the old set that have been replaced with larger, lighter ones pictured in the opening post. But the vid shows the Honda at about 3/4 throttle pushing us along at about max hull speed. More throttle did not get more speed.

    In another trip, I burned about 1qt of gas in about an hour at the same setting, constant running. This motor runs without a hiccup and starts like a typical Honda generator, from which they got the motor. Sounds like one, too.

     
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  5. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue —- Roughian #7 -— --- Graybeard -— Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Glad you survived John. I envy the trip but not the effort.
    My project boat is waiting for the major homeowner projects to slow down here.
     
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  6. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue —- Roughian #7 -— --- Graybeard -— Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Do you steer with the rudder and just leave the motor straight ahead?
     
  7. OutnBacker

    OutnBacker Guide

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    Yes, just the rudder. The clamp for tensioning the down shaft on the motor is plastic so I don't want to think about eventual wear as the motor gets steered. The long Norwegian style tiller works best in a long, skinny hull because you can be pretty much anywhere within 12ft of the rudder yoke and still have a hand on the tiller. A Norwegian tiller is a push/pull type. Mine is simply a painter's extension handle that goes from 5ft out to 12ft with a couple of clicks. Another advantage is that when I'm solo, which is 95% of the time, I sail the boat from the center, keeping the hull trimmed, and the tiller is close at hand. A third advantage is that in a common dinghy, the tiller is a swing type because the width of the boat allows it, but not in a canoe. Push/pull works best.

    The Scandi fishermen developed this type of steering long ago because they often had a mizzen sail in the back of the boat and there was no room to swing a typical tiller, so they rigged this up. Makes sense.
     
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  8. Red Yeti

    Red Yeti Mostly Harmless Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Nice one buddy!

    Sometimes the wind and current just don't cooperate... but I bet you had a good adventure anyways. Any day on the water is a good one in my book. Fantastic boat!

    Keep you keel wet,

    :dblthumb::38:
     
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  9. Robedsubset

    Robedsubset Scout

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    Thanks for the response! I have a Grumman Sport Boat that needs a motor. I currently use an electric trolling motor but worry about running out of juice on a full day on the water or multiple day trip. I’m leaning towards Yamaha or Honda
     
  10. OutnBacker

    OutnBacker Guide

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    These days you really can't go wrong with any motor. You might consider Tohatsu as well. They make the Mercury and Nissan small motors, too. I had good luck with a 2010 6hp for one of my sailboats for a awhile. very nice motor.

    EDIT: On the subject of electrics... Ifyou're going to be fishing all day or multiple days, a gas motor can get you home if the charge goes too low on the electric. But fishing with any gas motor in a canoe is almost impossible regarding trolling speed. They just don't weigh enough or create enough drag to keep the speed down. And, a single cylinder gasser will vibrate too much for trolling. Your line will be like an alarm system all the way to the lure. A heavy fiberglass fishing boat is fine with a gasser, but not a canoe. My Grumman is not any noisier under gas motor drive than a Royalex canoe. Canoes just don't have the mass to soak up the signals to the water.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2019
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