Finding a first pistol - Found it finally!!

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by HannahT, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    I'm looking mainly for something to carry in the woods when I'm out by myself. I've been doing some research, and I definitely plan on getting some good training. I've used a rifle and shotgun some (still pretty green with those) but have only shot a handgun a few times with close supervision :D

    Here are some of the things I'm hoping it'll do for me:
    1. ammo is cheap enough to do plenty of target practice
    2. general self defense
    3. be able to take care of any varmints I come across (got beavers in our lake, which is manmade and has a dam :mad: )
    4. beginner friendly!

    I know the four safety rules - my dad got those fixed in my head when I started shooting. But I'm still new to shooting. I'd sure appreciate any thoughts you all have on which gun I should get. I don't really plan on concealed carry, but it's definitely in the realm of possibilities. Mostly I think I'll be carrying on my hip. I don't really have a preference between a revolver and a semi-automatic. What features should I look for? I'm intending to take somebody with me to buy one that knows guns and knows how to tell whether one fits me.
     
  2. scottman

    scottman Bushmaster

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    Sounds like a general purpose open carry 357 revolver would be right up your alley

     
  3. SpookyPistolero

    SpookyPistolero Slow learner Lifetime Supporter Bushclass I

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    Sounds like a simple 9mm would work well. Cheap to feed, mild recoil. Just go handle some name brands and see what feels right. A Smith M&P has adjustable back straps(to fit smaller or larger hands) and comes in various sizes. They are not expensive. Glocks grow in trees in most areas.
     
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  4. Woodsroamer

    Woodsroamer Scout

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    If you reload a 327 federal mag might be perfect with a mix load of 327 mags and 32 longs in the chamber. If not I would say either a 357 mag or a 45/410 like the judge.
     
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  5. tristndad

    tristndad Supporter Supporter

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    I second the revolver for a simple woods gun. They are reliable, easy to maintain, and simply feel good in the hand. I also agree with it chambered in 357, but I would recommend shooting 38 specials out of it.

    There are alot of great options out there and I have a feeling you are probably going to end up with more then one eventually. Basing this solely on your fire kits posts.
     
  6. Mr. Tettnanger

    Mr. Tettnanger Supporter Supporter

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    Revolver
    Ruger GP100 357/38
    S&W 686

    Semi Auto

    S&W Shield
    Ruger Security 9
    Glock 19
     
  7. Duncsquatch

    Duncsquatch Heed the call. Supporter

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    For your first handgun I would get a 22 revolver that had both cylinders for 22 long rifle and 22 mag. just get one with adjustable rear sight so you can actually sight it in. 22 mag is actually really deadly.

    I've had the most fun with any pistol with a 22 revolver. For your first gun don't get a snub nose.
     
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  8. cbrianroll

    cbrianroll Professional Tinkerer Supporter

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    My first thought is 9mm...lots of decent priced ones, big, med, small, high capacity...endless lol. Wifey carries a 9mm, I carry a 40cal...I like Springfield, sig, rugar, kimber....not a big fan of Taurus after waiting nine months on a defective firing pin....kahr seemed nice, but I'm picky about how it feels....sounds like you are gonna be handling alot guns, take your time and make sure it is comfortable and if its auto....the slide should not wobble!
     
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  9. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    You know me too well :D

    I'm not sure I'll ever get into reloading, but I'll admit to drooling over the Judge :)
     
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  10. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    9mm is what I've leaned toward, based on the little info I've found so far. I hope to actually hold a bunch to see what feels good! If I can steer clear of those "Here, this is what you want" kinds of salesmen :rolleyes:
     
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  11. scottman

    scottman Bushmaster

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    You never mentioned your budget
     
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  12. Woodsroamer

    Woodsroamer Scout

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    I agree that 22 mag can be deadly, but don’t think it would make a great option for a general purpose handgun. For the simple fact that some defensive situations require extreme accuracy or more knock down power. And with her not having a lot of experience some more oomph would probably be better, though not to much at first.
     
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  13. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    Whoops! I'm hoping to stay under 500 for the gun and a few accessories. That's definitely a bit flexible - I still don't have a good picture of what one should cost, and I'm more concerned with getting something reliable than counting pennies. I'd much rather buy something good now than have to replace/repair it later :D
     
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  14. Woodsroamer

    Woodsroamer Scout

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    Just do what I do. Go I want to see that one and that one and so forth:18: they normally will be to busy handing you guns to make a sale attempt.
     
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  15. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    That "not too much" part has run through my mind a few times :D I like the idea of a good ol' .45 revolver but I think I want to work up to that later :)
     
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  16. scottman

    scottman Bushmaster

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    Most recommend a spare handgun too so I was curious on that and how fast you want and can budget a spare handgun.
     
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  17. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    I'll probably end up with one sometime. It might take me awhile though. What's the benefit of having a second handgun?
     
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  18. Woodsroamer

    Woodsroamer Scout

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    Police trade in 9mm and maybe checking out a reliable pawn/gun shop for a used 38 spl might be able to come in around $500 for both. Though for a decent priced reliable 9mm I recommend a Taurus pt111 g2, they run about 2-250.
    That’s why I like reloading you can start real light and work your way up. A lee classic loader, the one with a mallet, would probably be the cheapest way to get into it. See if there’s an indoor range near you, so you can play around and fire different guns. You will be able to see what you can and can’t handle without buying them.
     
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  19. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    I'm not aware of any ranges around here, but I could be wrong. I'd definitely like to actually shoot a gun before I buy it. A friend of a friend has quite a collection of guns, and I've shot several. He may have some examples to try.
     
  20. Duncsquatch

    Duncsquatch Heed the call. Supporter

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    I guess what I'm getting at is you need to learn how to shoot a revolver/pistol before you even think about defense. There's nothing better to learn than what I suggested.

    Just like with traditional archery it's better to start on a 30 35 lb bow to learn the technique before you even think about trying to go kill a deer.
     
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  21. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    Thanks for all the advice so far! I'm logging it all in my brain! I just knew you all would give me the real deal here :)
     
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  22. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    Lots of practice :) I may even get or borrow a .22 pistol to practice on, depending on what I spend on the other one. I think my mom has a .22 pistol I could use.
     
  23. 45Smashemflat

    45Smashemflat Scout

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    A 22 revolver is tough to beat as a first gun, and it will always be useful. That said, it's not the most reliable in a self defense role. A 4-6" 357, as mentioned, gives you many options. 38s are good low power practice ammo, 357s are arguably one of the best defense loads. Snake shot in that caliber is very effective.

    Only one answer, get both! :)
     
  24. Bullhed78

    Bullhed78 Guide

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    My advice is a full size, semi auto 9mm from any of the top brands. They are cheap to shoot and easy to handle. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking the smaller the gun the easier to control. My preference is Springfield Armory XD series but certainly wouldn’t steer you away from Glock, Sig, S&W, etc. There are so many good choices out there.
     
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  25. Wasp

    Wasp DOWN IN DIXIE Supporter

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    Do some research on your own too besides just asking for opinions. Not that you wouldn't, just sayin.
    If you know anybody that shoots ask them to take you shooting again.
    When you go to the gun store you are looking for a gun that fits YOU. Handle a bunch, function check a bunch, aim down the sights without muzzling the clerk, make sure it all works for you.

    Look for practicality since thats what you mentioned in your OP. Fun guns are great and there is nothing wrong with that for a first gun, but if you're looking for practicality for SD against two/four legged critters and range time, then guns like the judge aint it. In fact for your first gun, if you pick well it'll be fun.

    Id reccomend a 9mm, ammo is stupid cheap right now, I have some ammo deals posted in the Palmetto State Bushcraft Deals thread somewhere in the first five pages of the firearms subforum. Its like $150 for 1000 rounds w/ free shipping. I'd buy a deal like that while you can. No thats not much ammo in case you're wondering. You can go through a few hundred rounds in a range session.

    Like I said, you're looking for something that fits you, but If I were recommending a place to start a Shield first generation or shield 2.0 isn't a bad place to start looking. Lots and lots of options these days which is great.

    Your objective right now is to be on a mission absorbing as much information as you can get your hands on as to models and their characteristics as well as shooting and safety in general.

    Don't be intimidated, everyone had to start somewhere and there is A LOT of information put there.

    Congratulations on deciding to take your first steps towards being a gun owner and for exercising your rights.
     
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  26. dial1911

    dial1911 Supporter Supporter

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    Before plunking down a big chunk of cash, I'd go and hold all you can at local gun stores. Find something you like the feel of and then go do a rental (hopefully at a local range, possibly meet a friend to shoot theirs).

    As far as calibers, I can't argue with what I've seen here:

    9mm (Glock, S&W, Springfield... just personal preference in what fits your hand best)
    .38 Special/.357 Mag (The Ruger GP100 is a very solid revolver. It's kind of heavy, but that's because it's built like a tank. I've had two of them and they're great).

    I tend to stay away from Taurus guns only because of two of my friend's experiences... both sent in for repairs because the firing pin would hang and prevent the revolver cylinder from rotating.. both sent back to Taurus for work and both came back with the same problems. That's a really small sample size (2 guns) and others may have had much better experiences.

    And I'd mention that Aim Surplus occasionally has great deals on used S&W revolvers in .38SPL/.357 Mag. They are usually police trade ins that are in great condition ( I have one- super happy with it).

    One last thought is that revolvers may have fallen out of the mainstream these days, but if I have to make the first shot count, there's nothing better than a revolver shot single action, in my opinion (if I can't have a rifle.... rifle's are so much more accurate there's no comparison to a handgun).
     
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  27. masiaka

    masiaka Scout

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    You have two options: get one gun in one caliber for both practice and woods walking OR get one gun in two calibers so that your practice ammo isn't as close in price. to your defensive ammo. Personally, I think picking one caliber for everything makes more sense for a beginner. 9mm Luger (aka 9mm Parabellum aka 9mm NATO) makes a lot of sense. Because it's so common in police and military use, the ammo is some of the cheapest you'll find.
    9mm is the most common self defense pistol caliber for civilians in the US, not just police and military. You should also consider the other police service calibers: .38 Special, .357 Magnum, .40 S&w, and .45 ACP (aka.45 Auto). You'll find a lot of shooters carrying .380 ACP (aka .380 Auto), which is the little brother to 9mm. Not quite as much energy, not quite as much recoil*, and not quite as heavy bullets. It's sort of controversial online, but I think it's close enough to 9mm to be a good choice if you use good ammo. Fewer people carry .22LR (.22 long rifle) or .22 Magnum for self defense, but some do. I don't recommend this unless you have no other choice. They pack much, much less of a punch for self defense and, more importantly to me, the primer compound inside the ammo itself isn't as reliable to ignite. This means that you will experience more malfunctions with .22 pistols and revolvers just because the ammo won't fire. Not a lot of malfunctions, but enough to measure the difference. For self defense, I'm not comfortable with that.
    Here's where the .380 isn't as good. For the other service calibers, Federal Ammunition and CCI manufacture shotshell (aka rat shot aka snake shot) for snakes and pest control. You can't find .380 shotshell.
    You're not going to get a consistent answer about what is beginner friendly. Some people think revolvers are beginner friendly because there's no magazine to lose and no slide to rack before it's ready to shoot. Some people think that the trigger of a revolver is harder to deal with than the magazines and slides from pistols. Hammerless revolvers usually have heavy, long triggers. If your revolver has an exposed hammer and you cock the hammer back, you have to pull the trigger to drop the hammer and make the gun safe to carry again. If your revolver has an exposed hammer and you cock the hammer back, you also have to pull the trigger to drop the hammer if you want to unload the revolver. Some people think that a safety on the outside of a pistol is good for beginners because it lowers the risk of a negligent discharge if the gun is being handled wrong, other people think that an external safety is something that makes gun handling more complicated and is too easy to forget about when you draw the pistol in self defense. See what I mean? Honestly, not very many handguns are too complicated to learn. Pick something and get comfortable with it by practicing. I don't think you can make a bad choice, except for choosing not to practice enough.
    I always advise a new shooter to get the biggest, heaviest gun shooting the least powerful ammo that fits their needs. There are some exceptions, but the bigger heavier guns in the same caliber will have less recoil than the smaller guns. Basically, I think it's better to buy a full size 9mm pistol for your first handgun, not a subcompact .45 ACP. It's better to buy a steel frame revolver to shoot .38 Special, not an aluminum frame revolver to shoot .357 magnum.

    *Many .380 pistols are TINY. That makes them hard to hold onto and gives them snappy recoil, compared to bigger pistols. I feel like most 9mm guns are easier to shoot than the smallest .380s.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019
  28. Grouse870

    Grouse870 Scout

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    .22 is always a good idea. But next would be a 9mm. S&W M&P can be had for about 400. Gives you enough for for a decent holster and mags. Glocks are good too but new sights need to be factored in as they generally (there are a few exceptions) come with plastic sights so that needs to be budgeted.
     
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  29. jackpine

    jackpine Fire? I don't see any fire!? Supporter Bushclass I

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    Rock Island 22/45? 22lr for cheap fun and 45 acp to “get er’ done”
     
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  30. AdamD1776

    AdamD1776 Scout

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    I shot a Browning Buckmark at a local range, and I have to say, I was quite impressed with it (other than the stock sights, a fiber-optic front sight would have made aiming much easier). Being a .22, it will be cheap to feed, but I don't think it would be a good choice for self defense, though.
    Having a .22 for practice, general range time, and small game hunting/woods-bumming, and something bigger for self defense/concealed carry (should you go that route) may not be a bad idea, and could actually save money in the long run in ammo costs.
     
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  31. masiaka

    masiaka Scout

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    One to practice with and one to carry a lot but shoot little. That puts less wear and tear on the defensive gun and makes it less likely you'll have a part break when you need the gun to save your life. I'm a collector, so I don't have any identical guns. But I do cycle through them regularly and try to stay ahead of any problems with preventive maintenance.
     
  32. Oldguy59

    Oldguy59 Roughian #5 Supporter

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    My personal preference would be a 4” .357. Learn with 38s. Then you have ammo choice from light target.38s to full power heavy bullet .357. But..
    How big are your hands? Grip size will make a big part of your final decision. A full size 9mm may be to large.
    I’d find a range with rentals and try what you like. Don’t let anyone what a woman’s gun is. My mom shoots a 1911 in45 my wife likes my .32 S&W. If you were out here I’d let you try some of mine.
     
  33. gila_dog

    gila_dog Supporter Supporter

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    I would recommend buying a .22 pistol first. With that you can easily, and cheaply, learn to shoot a handgun very well. And it will always be useful to you in the future just to shoot for fun and refresher practice, and even hunting. It's actually a self defense weapon, too, if absolutely necessary. Then buy a serious self defense handgun that works the same way as your .22, either semi auto or revolver, but both the same. What you learn, and the habits you develop, on one pistol will translate directly to the other pistol. Regarding the choice of revolver vs semi auto... the main advantage of revolvers is simplicity of operation. The advantage of semi autos is more firepower (faster shooting, more ammo, quicker reloading). The disadvantage of revolvers is limited capacity and slowness of reloading. The disadvantage of semi autos is more complexity to operate, clearing jams, and difficulty for weaker hands to operate the slide, and to load ammo into magazines. If you can go someplace and get some instruction, and also shoot various kinds of pistols, I would sure recommend that. Good luck, and have fun!
     
  34. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    Wow - lots of stuff to chew on here :) @Wasp I'm definitely doing some digging on my own :) I've been reading one beginner guide after another online and hunting videos to get some foundation, as well as looking into specific guns.

    There are a couple good-sized gun stores pretty close to me. I'm going to check out as many kinds as I can.
     
  35. HannahT

    HannahT Firebug Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    My hands are small. I'm 5' 3" myself :D
     
  36. AdamD1776

    AdamD1776 Scout

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    I'm regards to the gun stores, try and find one that doesn't put the trigger locks on the guns when they let you handle them, even better would be if you can dry fire them. I shot black powder with a friend once, and tried one of his revolvers. The grip felt great, until I went to squeeze the trigger... It immediatly felt awkward, and I found it hard to operate the trigger. I went from loving it to hating it instantly, and would never have know with a trigger lock on it.
     
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  37. masiaka

    masiaka Scout

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    No matter the frame size, you should be able to find a grip size that works for you. If the pistols feel too big, ask about thinner options. If the revolvers do, ask for a round butt revolver.
     
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  38. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue —- Roughian #7 -— --- Graybeard -— Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Yep.
    Can’t beat a 357 revolver, IMO. Versatile, tough, reliable.

    Yes, something like a single six is a great tool. But, if I could only have one handgun, it would be a stainless revolver. Last for lifetimes and affordable to shoot.
     
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  39. Wasp

    Wasp DOWN IN DIXIE Supporter

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    Don't listen to the gun counter salesmen about what to get. Just ask to see one after another with similar ergonomics or calibers. You just need to get a feel for what you want right now.
     
  40. masiaka

    masiaka Scout

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  41. woodsranger

    woodsranger Solitude Seeker

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    Ruger LCRx. 3" barrel, .38 cal., and unlike most revolvers its trigger is easy to pull. I'd normally suggest the heavier Ruger SP101 but it has a pretty heavy trigger pull from the factory.

    https://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/96839/ruger+5431+lcrx+5rd+38sp++p+3"

    For 9mm, I'd recommend the Walter Creed. Inexpensive, reliable, and has a good trigger.

    https://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/23242

    And since you live in Kentucky (I did too!), shop at Bud's!
     
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  42. Black Raven

    Black Raven Supporter Supporter

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    I won't recommend anything specific. Because recommendations simply aren't worth much outside the context of the general notion of what might be useful in the woods. Many handguns are or could be useful in the woods and might meet what you think you might want, as you have seen from the responses so far.

    I will recommend that you: (1) find a friend, or a friend of a friend, who has a number of handguns and then shoot them all, or (2) find several friends that have a few handguns and then shoot them all, or, (3) find a rental facility that has a number of handguns that you can rent and shoot as many of these as you can afford to. The idea here is to shoot as many different varieties as you can. You gotta shoot them, you really do. And believe me, most gun folk are quite generous in sharing their enthusiasm.

    Your idea of starting off playing with a .22 is sound. And if you decide a .22 is right for you at the moment, nothing wrong with that once you learn to shoot it well.

    Some guns and some calibers will speak to you and others simply will not. So I recommend that you avoid, for now, specific recommendation until you become more familiar with as many handguns as you can and you start to get a feel for what works. For you. And you will only get that feel by shooting. Not by mere handling, not by internet reviews, and certainly not by anyone else's advice about this specific model, caliber or whatever. These become valuable once you get that general feel for what works. For you.

    After you decide what general genre of gun (revolver/auto/heavy/light/capacity/barrel length and various other features) and in what range of calibers and what range of price might be right for you, then you can start looking for specific models that are relevantly similar to those that speak to you. Don't be surprised if several guns that are quite different from each other make your cut.

    When you are ready to buy, buy the best you think you can afford.

    After that you can proceed to training and practice.
     
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  43. highlander

    highlander Veni Vidi comedit lardum Supporter

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    I’m not giving an opinion, merely telling you my favorite pistols. A Smith &Wesson Model 10 is probably the handiest woods gun I’ve ever owned.
    Accurate, light, little recoil and a 4” barrel is not difficult to carry. I didn’t want it to be a CCW pistol.
    My next choice, and the only pistol I own right now is a Ruger Standard .22.
    Accurate, a bit on the heavy side, no recoil, but cheap to shoot. .22 Ammo price is back down now.
    The only other .22 semi-auto I personally would consider buying would possibly be a Sig Mosquito.

    Find what fits you and is comfortable for you.
    Don’t let the gun store guys steer you into a buy that you’ll regret. It sucks owning a gun that you can’t shoot because of wicked recoil or poor fit.
    It’s your investment, and you’ve got to be confident and comfortable with it.
     
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  44. 45jack

    45jack Supporter Supporter

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    If you’re thinking center fire the .38 special is one of the best rounds ever invented.
    Pick up a used .38 or .357 for woods walking.
     
  45. woodsranger

    woodsranger Solitude Seeker

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  46. WFR

    WFR Supporter Supporter

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    I've had the luxury of owning many guns over the years as I used to be an Operations Manager with Gander Mountain and had access to the used gun inventory throughout the company.
    My wife has had the opportunity to shoot many of them. She recently qualified for her Concealed Weapon Permit using a Glock 19 in 9mm.
    She is also very comfortable shooting any of our .357/.38 revolvers.
    Given your criteria, I'd opt for a Glock 19 and not overthink it.
    It's very easy to field strip and clean. If you don't clean it then it's probably still going to run fine.
    Ammo is plentiful and can be bought anywhere. If you are willing to buy by the case you can get good range ammo for $7.50/box.
    Revolvers are great but ammo for .357 and .38 are going to cost considerably more.
    If you do opt for a revolver I'd go for a K-frame S&W in .357 or .38 Special. Look for a model 65, 66 or 13 in .357 or a model 10 or 64 in .38 Special. There are still some police trade-ins that can be found in these models.
    Good luck!
     
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  47. jstert

    jstert Scout

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    asking for advice on a first handgun here is like seeing the reaction to throwing food pellets into a fish hatchery, lots of great advice will surface fast. i’m of the mind that sooner or later a 22 handgun is in most every gun owner’s safe. if portable self defense from two or four legged apex predators is your immediate job #1, a minimum 38sp or 9mm centerfire handgun that you will enjoy 200 round practice sessions should be first choice. borrow or rent several. otherwise a 22 handgun is never a wrong first choice.

    with a $500 budget my specific recommendation is a new ruger single six 22wmr/lr single action revolver, decent used ones are $300. built like a brick outhouse. made for the great outdoors. simple manual of arms. utterly reliable. 22wmr handgun specific is ok for static protection for sub-apex predator threats that most folks may randomly encounter. 22lr for lots of cheap practice and learning. a heritage roughrider is a much cheaper and ok enough single action clone, but the ruger will last just about forever.

    if the ruger single six is too heavy then i suggest a new $300 ruger sr22 semiauto pistol. reliable, handy, adjustable grips, lightweight enough to be a ccw, easy to fieldstrip. if better accuracy is a higher priority that carry ability consider a 4.5” barrel over the original 3.5” barrel.

    i’ve not tried one but a 3” ruger lcr-x 22lr sa/da revolver is highly regarded.

    oh yeah i second the advice to politely steer clear of advice given at handgun sales counter.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2019
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  48. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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    @HannahT You are getting good advice here, all around. I sped-read most of this, apologies if this has been mentioned and I missed it. Many suggested .357/.38 revolver. Revolvers overall are reliable, but what has not been mentioned enough? While a hot .357 is not kind to those slight of frame, there can be many, many variants between .357 and .38. You can custom load many variations, but that's not how to start learning.

    If you are new to handguns, I think many .357/.38 gun could teach you to flinch. A good .22 could do more about teaching you sight picture, trigger control, etc. 9mm ammo is cheap (and certainly many good choices there), .357/.38 can be expensive? .22 is dirt cheap, by comparison. It's recoil won't hurt you while you learn technique.

    Good luck, have fun, learn the basics!
     
  49. Staleym

    Staleym Dunadan of Cascadia One of the Free People Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Hey there @HannahT. I just saw this though it appears I am late to the show. I am 66 and have been around firearms since I was 8. I served in the Army and have carried sidearms professionally in my life. Based on your uses listed, I would recommend a SIG 9mm semi-auto. I have the SP2022 and got it for $400.00 last year. It has polymer frame 2 interchangable grips for hand size, a 4 inch barrel, and 2 standard 15 round magazine (can get it in 10 round mags where required). I am expert qualified on S&W Model 10 .39 Special and .45 ACP Model 1911. The SIG SP2022 is the most comfortable, accurate out of the box and fun to shot pistol I've ever used. A revolver is great for varmints, and less useful for self protection. The new 9mm Self Defense Rounds are very functional and practical for that purpose and they do not suffer from over penetration the Full Metal Jacket rounds are criticized for. The SP2022 is Double Action (10 lb. trigger pull) for the first shot and Single Action (5 pound trigger pull) for follow ups shots. The sights are high contrast white dots. This is a full sized pistol. It has a hammer, not an internal striker, which I prefer. If you want a striker style pistol, the SIG 365 is another good choice. As for Ammo cost, 9mm is 20% less per round than .45 ACP. You can get cheap 9mm FMJ rounds to practice for a very reasonable price. The SIG pistols are US Made.

    20190711_221501.jpg 20190711_221520.jpg

    Best of luck with what ever you decide. Enjoy the practice.

    Warmest regards from Cascadia!
    Woody/Staleym
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2019
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  50. Tangotag

    Tangotag Field Gear Junkie Bushclass I

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    Get to a shooting range and put rounds through a Glock 19 and a Glock 45. Give yourself a baseline to try other guns against. Shoot lots of brands and models before deciding on what you want.

    Unless your biggest threat is Grizzlies or Polar bears, skip the revolver stuff for self defense. Modern law enforcement has done away with revolvers years ago. Nobody serious about saving their own skin or their loved ones uses them anymore.

    Gunfights and self defense situations statistically have a low percentage of hits on target. You need more rounds in your gun and on your person.
     

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