Flat vs. Scandi Grind?

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by Trojan1994, Sep 7, 2011.

  1. Trojan1994

    Trojan1994 Scout

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    For a bushcraft knife, blade less than 5", primary task, general food prep, cutting cord and possible light wood work/batoning/fire wood prep when a heavy knife/ax isn't available.

    Which grind would you choose? Is the Scandi that much less of a slicer for food than a Flat grind assuming the knife is available in both grinds?

    Regards,

    Tony
     
  2. Newt

    Newt Scout

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    Neither can compare to a convex for strength and durability.

    Food isn't typically much of a challenge unless you are talking about my Mother In Law's.
     
  3. bushwolf

    bushwolf Guide

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    A scandi will carve better, but can be damaged by rough use.
    A flat grind will be tougher, and better for batoning.

    In the end, it comes down to how you plan to use your knife.

    A thin scandi will slice just fine BTW.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2011
  4. Hiwa

    Hiwa Guide

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    I actually don't like scandi's too much and prefer flat. I find it easier to sharpen ( less metal to take off). My Blind horse bushcrafters (3) and all my favorites are full flat grind. I like the look of the blade better also.
     
  5. whiskersnitch

    whiskersnitch Guest

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    Ah, the age old (and somewhat tired) debate... In the end, as with all things, it comes to personal preference.
     
  6. Trojan1994

    Trojan1994 Scout

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    Interesting,

    had a conversation with a guy that was telling me the scandi would be better for batoning...main use would be for food prep, light cutting/fire prep...

    Regards,

    Tony
     
  7. Trojan1994

    Trojan1994 Scout

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    What a coincidence...

    I just ordered a BH Bushcrafter, flat grind!!!

    Any sharpening tips as to angle and/or stones/diamond stone?

    Regards,

    Tony
     
  8. beanbag

    beanbag Guest

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    IIRC, the BHK flat ground Bushcrafter has a convex edge, so forget about angles, put the stones and diamonds up on the shelf, and break out the wet/dry sandpaper and a leather strop.:dblthumb:
     
  9. goosefacer

    goosefacer Guide

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    Since we're talking the same knife and therefore same width at the spine, a flat grind will only be tougher if there is a secondary bevel - if it's a full flat to zero there will be less metal at the edge than a Scandi and therefore not be as tough.

    The full flat will be the better slicer and probably will fit the bill for you - IMO.
     
  10. Trojan1994

    Trojan1994 Scout

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    Hmmm, its listed as Flat Grind...

    Guess I'll find out when it arrives!

    Regards,

    Tony
     
  11. Quarter Tank

    Quarter Tank Tracker

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    i prefer full flat convex grind
     
  12. Kerri

    Kerri úlfheðnar Bushclass I

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    You can always convex the edge
     
  13. Iz

    Iz MEMBER of a BANNED Hardwoodsman Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    A modern scandi grind is a flat grind. It's just not a full flat grind, it's about 1/4 height on most knives.
    Try them both and see what works for you I say. If you listen to us you'll get nothing but confused.
     
  14. Trojan1994

    Trojan1994 Scout

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    Thanks, by reshaping it to convex

    what advantages does that provide?

    Regards,

    Tony
     
  15. Trojan1994

    Trojan1994 Scout

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    I hear ya, its

    appearing to be similar to a Ford vs. Chevy debate. Thanks, I've got a bit to learn about edged tool design/materials! I just may just have to pick up a scandi as well...for the sake of knowledge!!!:4:

    Regards,

    Tony
     
  16. petrifiedwood

    petrifiedwood Guest

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    After fooling around with a few scandi grinds I think a 28 degree scandi bevel is optimum.

    If I were making a flat grind I'd want about a 34-36 degree edge bevel.
     
  17. Hiwa

    Hiwa Guide

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    Congrats on the knife. Very good choice.

    I usually go 20 deg. a side for those. Sharpmaker or just by eye on a benchstone ( Norton fine india , 1000g wetstone , or 600g diamond) I have 2 black micarta with thinner handles and a green regular one. My favorite knife along with my Esee 4.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2011
  18. Trojan1994

    Trojan1994 Scout

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    Thanks, what is a Sharpmaker?

    Is that a brand of sharpening stones/kit or a model theddireof?

    Regards,

    Tony
     
  19. Kerri

    Kerri úlfheðnar Bushclass I

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    It will help with stengthening the edge as well as in my opinion at least makes it much easier to sharpen
     
  20. Geneh

    Geneh Supporter Supporter

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    Congrats on the knife! Now that decision is settled, the only suggestion I have is from a little wake-up call this weekend: my flat grind Rat-7, though a bit thick, wouldn't break the smaller wood (3 in, dry) as well as my son's 1/4" thick Becker...

    So I made a small wedge and after a cut, just stuck that and one smack it popped the wood open and done. Try using your sharp knife to turn another stick into a wedge. Lot's of folks here suggested it, I just didn't listen.... :)
     
  21. Hiwa

    Hiwa Guide

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    Sorry for the late reply. Had to log off.

    Norton makes waterstones as well as silicon carbide bench stones ( along with a lot of other items) I use their waterstones. You can buy them individually. A 220/1000 grit combination stone will do most of your sharpening. A 4000 grit can be used for a higher polish. If you can sharpen freehand they are an excellent way to go. A lot of folks sharpen with sandpaper also ( convex edge)

    DMT makes a lot of different diamond stones ; so does Lansky, Eze-Lap and others. I prefer waterstones and silicon carbide stones myself; a personal choice through experience. I prefer freehand as I can control the angle and " feel" the edge I'm making. There are very many opinions on this subject ; this is only mine.
    Hope this helps you.

    Pete
     
  22. Trojan1994

    Trojan1994 Scout

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    Thanks Pete!

    I appreciate the info., last night I ordered up a Diamond Stone Sharpening Kit from Lansky as nothing similar was available locally.

    I saw the Eze-lap and may pick up a set as well.

    I will google the Norton products and read up some more, thanks again!

    Regards,

    Tony
     
  23. JC1

    JC1 Guide

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    does anyone have cross cut pics showing the different grinds? I dont have a clue which is which, actually I never cared as long as it was sharp because I didnt know it made a difference
     
  24. Hiwa

    Hiwa Guide

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  25. EagleRiverDee

    EagleRiverDee Guide

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    Look here:
    http://www.bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12382
    Scroll down to the third post.
     
  26. JC1

    JC1 Guide

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    thank you
     
  27. moxonone

    moxonone Scout

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    Aint that the truth.Ive been confused for the past few years. :4:
     
  28. mountain joe

    mountain joe Scout

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    If I'm not mistaken, With two blades the same, one with a flat grind and the other with the scandi grind the scandi blade would be a tougher more durable blade overall. There is more steel on the overall blade on a scandi. Therefore the scandi blade would be a better blade in my opinion where rougher work is to be done such as batoning. The leading edge of a scandi may not be quite as durable as a full flat grind with a secondary bevel at the leading edge. Looks like a full flat with secondary bevel at the leading edge would have more metal at the leading edge back towards the back of the blade for a fraction of an inch. So it appears to me that a flat with secondary bevel would have a slightly more durable edge but that the scandi would be a more durable knife blade overall.

    I'm not an expert by any means. This is just the way it appears to me by looking at the two edge types.
     
  29. idahoelkhunter

    idahoelkhunter Scout

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    As luck would have it i just tried slicing some cheese with my Mora before checking the posts. It sucked. Cuts great until it hits the end of the grind then kicks it out. But I am not sure i would trust a 100% flat to camp chores for fear of chipping it due to the lack of metal.

    My suggestion - buy both and play with them. There are some cheap good knives to be had. Mora, Old Hickory, Green River etc. My mora has become my primary backpacking blade but I carry a Forchner boning and skinning knife when i am hunting. BTW - they never come out of the pack except to butcher.

    So... I am of no help. lol.
     
  30. idahoelkhunter

    idahoelkhunter Scout

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    I want to add. The mora is the first scandi i have owned. It's true what they say. There are e-a-s-y to sharpen. A convex is next on my lest for t and e before i settle on a primary carry knife. Even when i choose a primary i will probably choose to carry the dedicated butcher knives for butchering. Tried butchering a moose with a Seal Pup - that was a nightmare. Actually gave it away after the hunt i was so po'ed. Now I realize i was just using the wrong tool for the job and gave away a great survival style knife.
     

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