Florida State Officials Trying to Extract Profits from Parks

Discussion in 'Florida' started by brswan, Feb 14, 2016.

  1. brswan

    brswan Scout

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  2. feellnfroggy

    feellnfroggy Guide

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    I've not heard any of this. There's enough logging outside the parks with the tree replacement programs. I know they won't touch ONF or Goethe.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2016
  3. polar bear

    polar bear Scout

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    Hunting is already allowed in State Forests. That's much safer than hunting in the parks. Grazing is iffy in my book, logging even more so. There is just too much risk for exploitation here.
     
  4. indybp57

    indybp57 Tracker

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    Certain Indiana State Parks are open for deer hunting a couple weekends a year to thin the herds which are overgrazing the vegetation. I believe they use a lottery system for the park hunts and allow bows only in the more populated areas. Indiana does not allow high powered rifles at all for any hunting so other areas are limited to shotguns.
     
  5. j_d

    j_d Scout

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    I personally support conservation. Without going off on a political tangent I would welcome responsible/renewable use over the more extreme anti use that some would support. Much like hunters do more for wildlife than most of the other animal lobbies. I don't know much about grazing impacts but hunting and some logging practices can be beneficial.
     
  6. Coryphene

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    Trying to not sound to political but an issue like this IS political. There are precious few wild places left in the eastern US. I am firmly against state government selling our parks' natural resources to the highest bidder. I think managed hunting can do wonders for the local ecosystems since we have pretty much pushed out all top predators in the eastern US. Grazers, loggers, drillers, no thank you. Opening up a conservation area for a quick tax revenue is the start of a very slippery slope.
    I would much rather hike foot paths and game trails, not logging roads.
    Planted trees are no more a forest then a freshly mowed lawn is a savanna.

    If we log out our old forests, there won't be any place left in the US to enjoy "Bushcrafting". At least not east of the Mississippi....
     
  7. brswan

    brswan Scout

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    I really don't have a problem with the hunting, its the logging that's most disturbing. Another topic brought up in the article was the privatization of some parks. Florida denies it but you never know.
     
  8. Soilman

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    I'm kinda siding with j_d. And when speaking on topics such as this, please remember these definitions:

    Preservation= NO use of a resource
    Conservations= WISE use of a resource

    Being a conservationist, I understand that resources, like timber, sometimes need to be utilized/harvested to rejuvenate the biodiversity, food supply, and habitat of many wildlife species. The key word in all this is WISE. These parks can be managed in such a way that it benefits everybody...man and wildlife.

    A great example of Preservation is what the NPS is trying to do with the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. They have severely restricted human access to the park, (except for NPS personell, of course) because of a few rare birds, and sea turtles that were using it for nesting areas. The NPS is also implementing an aggressive predator management program...essentially trapping and shooting native predators such as foxes, raccoons, etc. What has all this accomplished? Well, the lack of human presence has altered the habitat to the point that those rare birds have stopped using that area. Sea turtle nesting sites on other beaches are marked so that people can use the beach, but avoid disturbing the nests...but that's not good enough for the NPS at Hatteras! The severe restrictions have also had a devastating effect on the local economy. Many businesses have closed down due to the lack of patronage. So, this seashore will end up with no birds, no predators, and no people.
     
  9. Zoev

    Zoev Scout Bushclass II

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  10. feellnfroggy

    feellnfroggy Guide

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    Florida already does the controlled burns regular. It keeps everything about as renewable as it needs to be.
     
  11. feellnfroggy

    feellnfroggy Guide

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    The exact opposite has happen a few places. Silver spring state park sold their zoo animals and sold the park to the state.
     
  12. Portage_Monster

    Portage_Monster Experiencing Wanderlust Supporter

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    Personally, I'm pro conservation. Since we won't let the natural cycle of forest fires periodically clean our forests, something has to. I know nothing about the composition of the areas in question, but as a general practice I support sustainable logging. It might make the forest ugly for a few years, but in the long run it's good for it to be periodically thinned. I suspect that any logging that goes on would be under the direction/supervision of the park officials, so I'd like to think that it won't exactly be a slash and burn campaign.

    In other news, Minnesota actually introduced bison in a park to graze on the invasive species of sumac that was prevalent. There are good things to come from ideas like that.
     
  13. Mannlicher

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    alas, with the state budget as it is, dropping tax revenue, unemployment, more folks on the dole.........the State will find new revenue streams. Like it or not, it's gonna happen.
     

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