Forged vs. Stock Removal, whats your poison?

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by dirt7, Sep 14, 2018.

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Forged or Stock Removal?

  1. Forged

    42.1%
  2. Stock Removal

    57.9%
  1. dirt7

    dirt7 Supporter Supporter

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    Since I have been dabbling in forging my own, and have my own preferences I wanted to see what everyone likes. Personally I much prefer the "brut de forge" look with knives. The shiny, stock removal knives are pretty but don't have the same appeal to me.
     
  2. Wasp

    Wasp We are GO for Sting!

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    MP and Fiddleback use stock removal and still have forged elements in their steel. I like the new/old mix.
     
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  3. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

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    Ultimately it's all about geometry and heat-treatment, so it matters little functionally speaking (IMHO). Process-wise, I much prefer to forge, it's quicker and gives me more control.
     
  4. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    Yes.....

    I enjoy both forging and stock removal. Fit and finish isn't dependent on the method of obtaining the overall shape of the knife.

    For me, it's more of what steel will be used to achieve what I'm trying to do.

    Pic one; stock removal...

    20180803_011112.jpg

    Pic two; forged...

    20180803_011035.jpg
     
  5. Vpetrell

    Vpetrell Scout

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    Right now I like stock removal because forging in my 3rd story apartment is frowned upon. So is my shop I have in my den, but that’s another story.....

    Once I get my own place I’ll hopefully start forging knives

    Both appeal to me in different ways I guess.
     
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  6. WY_Not

    WY_Not Supporter Supporter

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    As @Jim L. said... Yes.

    I've bought both and made both. I like both styles.
     
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  7. MrFixIt

    MrFixIt Old Jarhead Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I don't forge, so stock removal for me.
     
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  8. Kyle363

    Kyle363 Supporter Supporter

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    I chose stock removal because it allows for the use of steels that are not recommended for forging.
     
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  9. MichaelBear

    MichaelBear Bushmaster Hobbyist

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    There is an article in Edged Tools forum discussing stainless vs carbon as well as forged vs stock removal methods. This is complicated and does not just end on type of shaping the steel. Heat treatment, desired looks and form, etc need to be included. For more traditional/rustic/primitive looks forged pieces definitely add to romance. Performance wise both could be made superb and equal in strenght, edge retention, toughness, flexibility, edge stability, etx., or both could be messed up. All depends on the maker.
    Good tread @dirt7 Thank you
     
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  10. kamagong

    kamagong Scout

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    Both. It depends on the steel, and the type of knife.

    There aren't many folders with forged blades.
     
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  11. MichaelBear

    MichaelBear Bushmaster Hobbyist

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  12. CowboyJesus

    CowboyJesus Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    not sure if you mean making or using....

    but for the sake of making i'm going to go with stock removal. i'll admit i haven't gotten much experience with forging yet, but the big reason is that stock removal is easy to do is short bursts, while with the forge, you've got to be able to commit some time to it when you fire it up. a working dad and husband only gets small pockets of time here and there!!
     
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  13. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    A genuinely forged blade, being a blacksmith ,represents effort I have more respect for.
    My first knives ,as a kid, were stock removal on files .
    When I learned the magic of fire, things changed .
     
  14. M.Hatfield

    M.Hatfield Midnight Joker Supporter

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    There IS something timeless about those style of knives. Where is the 'both' option? :)
     
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  15. schapm

    schapm Incompetent City Dweller Supporter

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    I suppose because I was raised around the world of historical reenactments I like forged knives for aesthetic and nostalgic reasons. I own stock removal blades that are excellent though, so it’s not an all or nothing proposition for me.
     
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  16. Guillaume Longval

    Guillaume Longval Friction Fire Addict Supporter

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    My poison is METAAAAL !!! and wood, and ... Crafting.

    I have a grinder. So i stock remove. When i get around to make my small propane forge, ill use both.

    I like the well used look of a tool, and forge finish gives a unique character. But some designs call for a pure line, just the right curve... I love both.
     
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  17. Monkeynono

    Monkeynono Supporter Supporter

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    MP does both forged and stock removal.

    I personally prefer that if is stock removal it should look like it, no faux forge mark.
     
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  18. Youcantreadinthedark

    Youcantreadinthedark Amphibian. Supporter Bushclass I

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    Depends on who's doing the forging or stock removal, really.
     
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  19. mtngunr

    mtngunr Scout

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    I go forged when forged by MS smith who knows reduction and multiple thermal cycles, clean grain, and differential treat and temper. THEN a blade worthy of legend.

    Otherwise, stock removal on known clean and fine grained steel with to the letter heat treat.

    Somebody only heating and beating can introduce far more problems into the steel molecular structure until much forging and much destructive tests to know what is really going on.
     
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  20. kronin323

    kronin323 Tracker

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    If the question is which do I prefer to make, the answer is neither.

    If the question is which do I prefer to use, the answer is both.
     
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  21. Gruntinhusaybah

    Gruntinhusaybah Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    That’s a pretty ignorant statement. There are a lot of people out there without an MS stamp who know how to make a fantastic blade.
     
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  22. icemancometh

    icemancometh Stuck in Suburbia Supporter

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    When I started attempting to make knives I was using stock removal. I tried forging for the 1st time last w/e. Turned out very rough. I am going to work on it some more today. I too like the appearance of a forged blade but stock removal is far easier for me.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
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  23. Sharpthings

    Sharpthings Scout

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    I very much like the brut de forge look as well.
     
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  24. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

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    It definitely takes experience (including doing actual destructive testing, IMHO) to forge a good blade. There are many excellent smiths out there who don't care to get ABS approval, though.
     
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  25. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    I'm going to ask a question to your question. Are you refering to the appearance of the steal being forged or hammered, or that of a fine finish that can be used as a signal mirror? Both finishes can be accomplished with both methods.

    There are those that believe that stock which is cut, then ground from an homogenous piece of steel is the best/only way to make a strong blade.

    There are those who believe (and quite convincingly argue) that forging will facilitate uninterrupted strands with in a grain structure that with the proper thermal cycling and final heat treat, the same steal used for stock removal would be far supirior in performane.

    I've seen a demonstration (video) of a smith using specific hammer strikes to "allow" (him) to manipulate the grain pattern/structure to bring "ordinary" steels to "super steel" performance.

    Everything is subjective, even laboratory quality tests.
     
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  26. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

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    Thinking about it more....most folks' work has aspects of both methods. The bar of steel used for stock removal was forged (or rolled) at one point, and every forged blade generally needs some stock removed before it's done....:cool:

    Finish can be decieving, too. Some of the most elaborately finished blades I ever made were forged...but then ground, sanded, polished and etched. I also made some 'brut' stock removal blades from old, rusted stock.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
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  27. dirt7

    dirt7 Supporter Supporter

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    I guess my question was a bit if both, I have seen plenty of forged knives you could blind yourself with on a sunny day. Personally I am not crazy about the mirror finish on some of the knives I've seen on this forum but luckily there are plenty of knives out there to choose from!

    I'm no blacksmith, and honestly half of what I've made from forging I've been winging it and hoping for the best. For me banging on steel enough to make something cut is just damn fun.
     
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  28. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    I'm there with you Brother.
     
  29. Coryphene

    Coryphene Guide

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    High precision water jet and laser cut. Digital controlled oven and cryo tanks. 3D sculpted handle scales for a perfect fit and finish.

    Or coal in a brake drum force fed with a hair dryer heating the steel for a skilled smith to pound on an anvil made from a piece of railroad track staked to a stump.

    Both take a great deal of work and make excellent blades. Some steels just aren't hand forged due to the steel used. Simple carbon steels can be great when hand forged. High alloy PM steels need a different type of craftsman.


    Of course ALL steel is forged. The only question: Is the knife shaped by repeated heating and hammering or ground to shape? As long as the heat treat is spot on, I don't care which method is used.
     
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  30. DrunkenMarmot

    DrunkenMarmot Tracker

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    Forge to shape as much as possible and then stock removal to finish/clean up any decarb etc. propane and coke are cheaper then good 2x72 belts. and swinging a hammer is more fun than grinding, although with fresh belts grinding is a blast too...
     
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