Gransfors Bruk Outdoor Axe Re-Haft

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by MJGEGB, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    So some folks might recall that @leightyj2 had an issue with the handle on his Gransfors Bruk Outdoor axe. Well he ended up getting a replacement for it and asked me if I'd be interested in putting a new handle on it and then sending it off on a pass-around. Around the same time @ClutteredShop put up the challenge for me to make a handle from scratch out of a material that I hadn't before. So I am making the handle for the Outdoor Axed from some Maple that I've been meaning to use for some handles for a very long time.

    [​IMG]Gransfors Outdoor Axe Maple Handle by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    So while I have the head off of the handle I figure I might as well post up some interesting info about it. First of all the weight on this specific head is 11.3 oz. I'd say that it qualifies as a mini hatchet. What's interesting is that it comes on a fairly long handle, longer than the standard 14" scout hatchet handle that generally comes on 1.25 lbs heads which are nearly twice the weight of the Outdoor axe,s head. One interesting feature about the head is a hourglass shape in the eye with a sort of ridge or apex midway up the eye.

    [​IMG]Gransfors Outdoor Axe eye by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]Gransfors Outdoor Axe eye Light by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    I'll be updating this thread as I progress through the handle and then hopefully putting the axe through it's paces before sending it on it's way.

    Tagging everyone from the passaround. @the_dude @tobiism @CivilizationDropout @Kelly W @Panzer @batmanacw
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2017
  2. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    So I told @leightyj2 I would take some pictures comparing the Outdoor axe with some similar sized heads i have handy. I snapped a couple of pictures and took some measurements tonight. I'll need to get some better pictures and add in the few missing hatchets that are similar in size as well.

    Gransfors Bruks Outdoor axe
    Weight: 11.3 oz
    Length: 4 6/8 Bit: 2 9/16 Width: 7/8 Poll: 1 ¼

    Gransfors Bruks Small Hatchet AKA Mini Hatchet (not pictured)
    Weight: 8 oz ?
    Length: 4 Bit: 2 ½ Width: ¾ Poll: 1 ¼

    Very old hand forged no makers mark
    Weight: 9.7 oz
    Length: 4 ¾ Bit: 2 ⅞ Width: ½ Poll: 1 10

    Lippincott Co / William Mann
    Weight: 10.9 oz
    Length: 4 3/16 Bit: 2 ½ Width: ⅝ Poll: 1 10

    Vaughan Subzero Sportsman's Axe
    Weight: 8 oz
    Length: 3 ¾ Bit: 2 5/16 Width: ⅝ Poll: 1 ½

    [​IMG]Hatchets GB Outdoor by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor axe and Company by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    And I went ahead and grabbed some more of my minis because reasons.

    [​IMG]Minis! by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]Mini Profiles by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    I got a bit of work done on the handle tonight. I started off by doing a rough layout of the width I wanted to get it down to before starting to fit the head and shaping the handle.

    [​IMG]Side One Start by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    I've mentioned the issue of tearout occurring when working with a spokeshave. Well this was when working with the hatchet. It's good to get a feel for how you can work the wood before you get close to the line or else you might remove more than you expected. Not a big deal here, but a good opportunity to take a picture of what I was getting at.

    [​IMG]Grain Tearout by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]Side One Midway by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]Spokeshave by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    And that's all for now. I got one side roughed out. One more to go and then the handle should really start to take shape.

    [​IMG]Side One Roughed Out by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    Aside from working on the handle I also sharpened up a few tools I've been using on this project. First I sharpened up my favorite carving hatchet. Then I ended up putting a much better profile and edge on my draw knife. It's missing a handle, but still useable and I plan to try it out a bit on the last side. And finally I took the blade out my spokeshave to sharpen it up. We shall see if I need to adjust the blade when I go to use it again, but it pays to keep it sharp.

    [​IMG]Sharpening up Tools by MJGEGB, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2017
  3. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Anyhow ran off to the garage last night unexpectedly to get away from a phone call my wife got stuck on that I didn't care to hear. I don't grab my camera so I decided what the heck let's toss the phone in the vice and grab a video. The quality is crap, and it's pretty repetitive, but for those interested in seeing some of be work that goes into making a handle when you don't have power tools to aid and assist here you go.



    IMG_20171026_220536.jpg

    IMG_20171026_220745.jpg

    Edit: 10/28/17 after getting the stupid oil pan off my wife's car and deciding to leave the rest of the job for tomorrow I did some work on the handle. I started shaping the tongue and getting it fitted to the eye. Its about 2mm thus far, but once I get back to it I imagine it will get fitted pretty quickly. Need to thin out the bottom section of the handle and shape the swell still. I didn't bother to take pictures because I'm tired and folks don't seem too interested in the progress so far.

    Edit: Halloween update, getting close to the final hang, still a bit more work to do after its hung. Still need to sand, sand, sand some more. I also ended up putting a couple of dents in the belly last night during test fits. I might need to hit it with some steam tonight to pull it out. I don't think the wood is quite as dense as Hickory which isn't a surprise. Time will tell how well it will hold up.

    IMG_20171031_202304.jpg

    First swing with the Outdoor axe. Pro tip if you can't safely swing your axe lightly without a wedge, it's not tight enough.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2017
  4. leightyj2

    leightyj2 Supporter Supporter

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    It is looking great so far!! :dblthumb:
     
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  5. Fretful7

    Fretful7 III Supporter

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    Looking forward to this.
    Sub'd !!
     
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  6. ClutteredShop

    ClutteredShop Guide

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    I hesitate to say anything at this point, but I'm wondering if it mightn't have been better to have flipped the pattern the other other way (like a mirror image) to get more favorable orientation of the grain lines, so they would be more parallel to the axis of the handle instead of cutting across from one side to the other. Was there some defect in the part you've already cut away that prevented that orientation?
     
  7. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    I honestly don't know why the grain appears the way it does in the picture. It had me scratching my head last night to be quite honest. I actually switched the side of the board I used in order to have slightly more favorable grain orientation. The grain on the entire board was within perfectly acceptable parameters for top notch handles. I need to go take a look at it and make sure it's just my eyes playing tricks on me.

    Edit: so I took a look at it, and as I recalled the grain was near perfect. The most important factor, run-out is a non issue. The grain runs straight down the middle. What shows in the picture is the side closer to the heart of the tree where there is more curve and tighter growth rings. The grain on some of those rings runs out into the side of the board due to tbe curvature of the rings. Most of that wood will be carved away anyway. It's really a non issue and just shows up looking completely opposite of what you would want in the picture. Now we could get into the fact that grain orientation means far less than run-out and I have a handle to prove it, but as I figured this being a Gransfors Bruk the grain orientation would be scrutinized I made sure it would be about as good as it gets on this handle.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2017
  8. ClutteredShop

    ClutteredShop Guide

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    I always have a problem when people discuss grain orientation. I wish the terminology were standardized. Often people apply the term "grain" to what they see when looking end-on at of the butt of the handle. I do not consider this pattern to be "grain"; what you're seeing there is growth rings. In my opinion, "grain" should refer to the direction that the wood fibers run in. In the butt, the fibers are running straight into to the wood. When the handle is viewed from the side the visible lengthwise-oriented pattern is "grain" as I use the word. Here we want the fibers to run as close to parallel to the length of the handle as possible. Your term "run out," if I understand it correctly, refers to the situation where the fibers angle out to the edges of the handle instead of being strictly lengthwise. This seems like a pretty good term to me because it describes the situation, and I agree that major run-out is far more serious that the orientation of the growth rings as seen from the butt.
    This picture is of a made-in-Sweden axe I picked up at a flea-market and haven't had a chance to fix up yet: crackedHandle1.jpg

    The person who cut out this handle wasn't paying attention at all. Rotating the pattern on the wood just about five degrees would have prevented this nasty (and catastrophic) run-out and consequent failure.

    On this outtake from your picture I have marked what looks to me like a similar, though perhaps less extreme case of run-out:
    MJGEGB_axeHandleBlankMarked2.jpg

    It's hard to be completely certain, but it looks to me like fibers entering the handle at point A exit at point B, and so represent a possible line of failure. At C and D the angle looks even less favorable, though a crack here wouldn't be as critical. However, I have certainly seen cases where viewing the wood from one angle does not give an accurate impression. Sometimes when I'm planing a board I have to actually start pushing the plane before I figure out how the fibers really run. This is by way of saying that your explanation, though I don't understand it completely, is quite likely correct.

    One of the things I like about making handles from green wood is that one can often find a curvy section where the grain actually follows the desired curves of the axe handle. That is the case with the yew handle I put in the challenge to you on @NWPrimate 's challenge thread: https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/the-ongoing-member-challenge-thread.206571/page-6#post-3518402
    I can't imagine that commercial handle makers ever take the trouble to select curvy grain to match the curves of a handle; that is a luxury left to us hobbyists.

    Anyway, have fun with the carving. I am still part way through two challenges, but not making any progress at the moment because I'm up to my ears in box elder that a tree-removal contractor dropped in my front yard (at my request, but it's more than I expected).
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2017
  9. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Yup, your swedish hatchet appears to have run-out. Looking at the grain orientation or growth rings at the end of the handle really doesn't tell you too much. In the case of the section of wood being used for this project the grain runs completely in line with the axe handle. I know that the picture seems to show otherwise, but trust me that is the case. I had attempted to snap a picture of it with my phone the other night, but my camera was giving me issues and for whatever reason it did not save the photo.

    It's hard to describe with words but the side facing up in the picture was from the inside of the tree where the rings have more curvature and in this case the rings are also much tighter. In any case all of that will be carved away leaving absolutely no run-out say for maybe a ring or two on the palm swell which is of no concern.

    Excuse the piss poor pictures because I used my cellphone and the lighting in my shop is absolutely terrible.

    IMG_20171025_070702.jpg IMG_20171025_070649.jpg IMG_20171025_070712.jpg IMG_20171025_070634.jpg

    So as you can see I could get slightly better by rotating the piece a degree or two, but it's simply not worth the effort. Especially on a straight handle such as this where the grain is certain to run end to end unlike your swedish hatchet.

    To your point about bent handles and curved grain. This is where the grain orientation that everyone goes on about matters the most. With the grain running the length of the handle or in parallel with the the eye throughout the length of the handle. In this case even without curve in the grain you will not violate the grain. There will be continuous connecting grain throughout the length of the handle. That is the primary reason that orientation is considered so important, the chances of having a stronger handle greatly increase if the grain is in line with the eye. Of course with a straight handle this matters far less, but I'm still aiming for about as good as one can get.

    Here's a good example of run out. Even though this is one of my favorite axes and it sees a fair amount of use it has some pretty serious run-out issues, especially considering the size of the eye. Look at the shoulder towards the top and you will see the Video shape where the run-out is at it's worst.

    [​IMG]Mini Hatchet Sheath by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    If it breaks I'll replace it, until then I'll keep enjoying it.

    Here are two handles with excellent grain orientation and little to no run-out.

    [​IMG]West Woods 18 Profile by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]West Woods 18 VS GB by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    And here is a handle with what is considered piss poor grain orientation, but still little run-out. It was made from a double bit handle that was abused for years and only needed to be replaced because the wood inside the eye was kept wet for so long it began to rot. It's still going strong.

    [​IMG]Hatchet handle from an old DB handle. by MJGEGB, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2017
  10. ClutteredShop

    ClutteredShop Guide

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    Your newer pictures of the handle you're working on make things much clearer. Looks like you'll have no problem. One of these days I'll start a post about ClutteredHandleFailures. I've got some doozies in the used axes I've acquired.
     
  11. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Well I've been slacking on documenting the progress on this project a bit. But tonight I figured it was worth a bump to share a trick that my old man taught me when I was a little boy. See when I was younger he ran a side business refurbishing furniture. I used to help him out and even took on some smaller jobs that weren't really worth his time. I actually made enough to purchase a brand new bicycle which was my pride and joy after my previous one was stolen. I kept it in my bedroom, but that's a different story. Anyway one of the many tricks of the trade he shared back then was how to remove dents from wood. A simple process, you start by laying a damp rag on the section with dents in it. Then you simply apply heat which creates steam. The steam will swell the wood and raise the dents back out.

    So what the heck does this have to do with making an axe handle? Well if anyone was following along I ended up denting the shoulder right where the head will sit once hung for the final time. So to recap I do many test fits to ensure a good snug fit. So snug that you can swing the axe with no wedge at all. In my experience this is key to a good hang. Well this involes removing the head multiple times as well. After the final test fit I ended up hitting the handle with my baton rather than the poll and dented the shoulder. Concerned that this might lead to a gap tonight I used the trick my father taught me to remove the dents. I'm happy to report it worked a treat. A bit more shaping, a bunch of sanding, and it will be time to make a wedge and hang this head one last time, at least for now.

    IMG_20171101_191529.jpg
     
  12. brionic

    brionic Blissful simpleton Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Good trick. I've used it on rifle stocks to great effect... as long as the wood is only dented, without any grain "tear" or runout.
     
  13. tobiism

    tobiism Supporter Supporter

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    that is really cool
     
  14. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter

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    Great thread; I'm learning a lot from reading (and re-reading!) this.
    Question: I think I'm guilty of mistaking growth rings for grain orientation. Matt, in your last pic showing the hatchet handle made from an old double bit handle, the growth rings are running perpendicular to the head, and the grain is almost perfectly parallel, correct?
     
  15. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    I think the point that was being made about the differences is that often people just glance down at the growth rings on the end of the handle and if they see that they are parallel to the axe head they claim that the grain orientation is good. The problem here is that the grain on the end might look perfect, but father up the handle could run directly out the side of the handle. This is called run-out as shown on my beloved mini hatchet with terrible grain, yet it's still in one piece ;-) The important thing is to look for continuous grain running throughout the entire length of the handle. The West Woods 18 inch handle and the Gransfors Bruk SFA next to it are examples of grain that is about as good as it gets. You can see that the growth rings or grain run true straight down the handle all the way from the swell to the tongue. Now what's funny is my handle with perpendicular grain would generally be seen as terrible grain orientation, but as you can see even though the grain is 90° to the head it runs straight down the length of the handle and so technically has better orientation than the handle on my other mini which has run out.

    [​IMG]Vaughan Sportsman's Axe Custom Handle by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    Here's a picture that shows the end grain of the handle with run-out. Judging by the end grain alone you might say it has acceptable grain orientation, or at least better than the other one which is completely perpendicular. The reality is very different when looking at the grain as a whole.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
  16. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter

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    Gotcha. Thanks.
     
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  17. leightyj2

    leightyj2 Supporter Supporter

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    @MJGEGB I gotta say the build is looking amazing! I had no idea you could get dents out with that method that is a pretty amazing trick. Also the mora 2/0 is looking awesome as well. Super excited to see how this one looks for final fit and finish. Your old man certainly taught you some pretty great techniques and I am glad we can all learn from you (and him) :dblthumb:
     
  18. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Alright folks I spent my weekend camping with my sons and their Cub Scout pack and so I just got back to working on the handle again tonight. I didn't take any decent photos, but the good news is it's beginning to look a lot like a handle!

    IMG_20171107_204104.jpg

    Edit: haven't really gotten anything else done on this as I've been feeling like crap for the past couple of days. I think I have a head cold or something. I'm excited to get this thing put back together though so I'll try to rally and get er done hopefully this week. Honestly there's not much left to do. Finish sanding, raise the grain, more sanding, raise the grain, more finish sanding, make a wedge, hang and wedge, trim the top, trim the swell at an angle, sand and bevel the top, sand and bevel the swell, jute twine collar wrap, epoxy the wrap, treat with oil and maybe some sort of stain, and put it to use. I'll try to get some better pictures of the final process as well.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2017
  19. Crooked Penguin

    Crooked Penguin Supporter Supporter

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    Yup, she's getting there [​IMG]

    Hope you had a good time camping with the kids, I guess you guys don't get much winter up there?

    Really curious to hear what you think about its performance when it's done!
     
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  20. ClutteredShop

    ClutteredShop Guide

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    For soft woods like pine there is an easier version of the dent-lifting trick. Put a little dollop of spit on it. For small dents it works within seconds.
     
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  21. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Few pictures of progress. It's pretty close to finished now, did some more work after this pics and then some more tonight. Took a few swings tonight and I've got to say I'm already starting to see why people like this axe ;) more to come.

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor 2 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor 1 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor 6 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor 5 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor 4 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor 3 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    The hang is not my best work, no need to point it out guys :2:
     
  22. tobiism

    tobiism Supporter Supporter

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    nonsense, looks like a great hang to me!
     
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  23. Crooked Penguin

    Crooked Penguin Supporter Supporter

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    I wonder if these are more difficult to hang then most heads perhaps?

    Because I've seen a few people complain about gaps between the head and handle on these. Mine has it too, and now it appears you leave a little gap at the front of the eye as well as far as I can tell from your picture.

    Is there less of need for a seamless fit because of that taper in the eye you mentioned earlier perhaps?
     
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  24. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    I've hafted a few axes by now and I've gotten the hang of it. Generally though most of my heads are American and generally Dayton's with a few other patterns in the mix. The almond shape tends to naturally push the head nice and tight against the back of the eye, and so long as it fills in the eye on the bottom, and the back of the handle is snugged up to the poll side of eye at the top the wedge can fill in any gap at the front easily. I don't know if that makes sense putting it in words, but I'll try to depict it later. With the oval eye you lose this advantage and the handle has to fit the eye perfectly on both the front and back straight through the entire eye or there will be gaps.

    Well with the Outdoor axe what is discovered is that traditional hanging methods don't work well. The head has a large bit and a small poll and so it is very unbalanced compared to a Dayton. Add the hour glass shape tends to let the head rock back and forth until it is finally set on the shoulder since there is only contact in the very middle of the eye. Because of this when hitting the bottom of the handle to drive the head on the bit side sets on to the handle faster and the head tends to shift on the tongue back to front and it ends up denting the handle where the front corner of the eye hits the handle. Eventually I found it was best to set the vice around the top proud portion of the handle and then hammer the handle down into the eye. This is how I did the final set of the handle. But there are still gaps :( the shame is nearly unbearable. This is also why I waited to cut the spare wood from the bottom of the handle until after the final hang.
     
  25. Jacob

    Jacob Supporter Supporter

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    I’m not seeing the gaps from here, i believe you but it looks perfect. I notice that the front-top of the eye has a little bevel too it but that’s a steel issue and there’s nothing to be done about it. No need for shame, it looks great. The head on mine started to come loose awhile back. I found a replacement handle from GB but it was 40$! Hopefully the steel wedge will last awhile because it sounds like a tough axe to hang. Great job!
     
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  26. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter

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    Beautiful job as usual, Matt. Is it a trick of the light, or is that an osage wedge? Either way it looks great.
     
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  27. Crooked Penguin

    Crooked Penguin Supporter Supporter

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    Yeah, that makes a lot of sense actually, and would also explain why people seem to mention gaps on these more so then on other GB models. Apparently even GB has trouble hanging these perfectly. Kinda makes you wonder why they went with this design of the eye, but I guess it has its advantages as well as it does leave a bit more room for meat on the handle at the front of the eye.

    Do you think it would be a good idea to grind down the inside of the eye a bit to tone down that hourglass shape for an easier fitting of the handle? Although I suspect you could easily loose another ounce of weight on the head that way which probably isn't desirable on these since they're already so light.
     
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  28. ra2bach

    ra2bach Supporter Supporter

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    sorry to hijack but I have a question relating to fit/gap - I got a couple of House Handles for my hatchet and the wedges are not as wide as the handle itself. is this normal?..
     
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  29. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Good to know it's not just me. I'm hoping that the handle doesn't come loose on this one, but if it does a metal wedge as must as I hate them would be an option. If it had to do it again I would leave more of a shoulder and cross wedge it.

    Nope, this is an Osage Wedge.

    [​IMG]Double Bit Hedge Wedge. by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    I used pine for the Outdoor axe, and have in most cases for some time now where I make my own. I find soft woods with perpendicular grain work best.

    No, I wouldn't change the hourglass shape. I think the main purpose is to lock the head in place on the handle. If I were to do it again like I said above I'd leave more of a shoulder and cross wedge it. That way the bottom would bottom out and fill the eye and the top would be filled with the cross wedge if there were any gap. Having filed and eye before I doubt greatly that you'd lose an entire ounce. I didn't loose anything notable on my Vaughan when I filed the eye to straighten and enlarge it. Still I'd leave it as is since Hudson Bay patterns are notorious for coming loose and I'd guess it was made to combat that issue. It's worth noting that with the factory handle the metal collar sits inside the bottom of the eye meaning the collar is the shoulder. My guess is this had something to do with the factory hang being off on this particular axe.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2017
  30. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    I like my wedges to be just a hair longer than the length of the eye from bit side to poll side. The extra will get shaved away leaving a nice snug fit while ensuring all the gaps are filled in. If they are just longer than the eye then I'd say you will be fine, otherwise I'd set them aside and make a new one. Doesn't take much effort with a saw and belt sander or rasp.

    [​IMG]Northern King VS SFA by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    Note how the wedge extends past the handle on both ends ensuring everything is filled in nicely. The extra material that didn't fit in the eye just curls up and can be cleaned up with a shop knife quickly.
     
  31. mainewoods

    mainewoods Maine Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Awesome post and very well done ! @MJGEGB
     
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  32. FreudianSlip

    FreudianSlip Guide

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    Looks great!
     
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  33. cbrianroll

    cbrianroll Tracker

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    Nice job! Schools in session lol. Anyone use walnut for handles? I found some leftover pieces in my garage that are good size. Good instrument wood.... Different animal I know...
     
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  34. ra2bach

    ra2bach Supporter Supporter

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    thank you, that is exactly as I suspected. I didn't see that you used wood glue on your wedge. do you do that or maybe just put a good soaking of BLO?
     
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  35. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Just BLO, I'm of the mindset that if your wedge comes out something with the hang isn't right. And if you need to take the head off or tighten up the hang in the future, wood glue is just going to get in the way.
     
  36. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    A couple of pictures from last nights fire prep. Ended up hanging around the fire till about midnight. The handle is pretty much done at this point. I want to add another coat or two of BLO and then a coat of bees wax. @leightyj2 it's finally time to start the pass-around thread, do you want to setup a new thread for all the participants to post in? Also I think it would be neat to see your thoughts on comparing this one to your new stock version. Let me know, as I'll be gathering my thoughts and finding excuses to use the Outdoor axe in the meanwhile.

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor Axe Maple Handle 2 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor Axe Maple Handle 1 by MJGEGB, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2017
  37. Muleman77

    Muleman77 Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    Looks like a step up from the factory to me, nice job.
     
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  38. Crooked Penguin

    Crooked Penguin Supporter Supporter

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    Looking good @MJGEGB !


    Makes sense, thanks for explaining it (again, lol). The second cross-wedge sounds like a good idea, I'll try that if mine ever needs to be re-hung. Interesting to know that the collar goes up in to the handle for a bit by the way, I was wondering about that.

    In case you're interested and hadn't seen one before; they sell original replacement handles over here for just under 20 bucks, and those come with the metal collar already installed. Not sure what that small thingie is on top of the wedge but it looks like it might come with an additional metal wedge as well as far as I can tell:

    [​IMG]
     
  39. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Yup that's a secondary metal wedge. I've only ever used them one time, and it was on a defective handle impossible to get a good hang on. They have there place, but in reality are almost never a necessity and tend to cause more problems than they solve. That wooden wedge looks steep to me, I'd probably thin it out a bit if I got one like that.
     
  40. leightyj2

    leightyj2 Supporter Supporter

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    The handle came out amazing IMO and I am super excited for how it turned out. That makes total sense why the oval shape would be more difficult to hang. Even the replacement outdoor axe they sent me was still not perfect although much better hung than this was on the factory handle before you got it. I think this handle will be more comfortable in the hand than the original outdoor handle because of the fawnsfoot being much more generous. I find the handle willl want to roll in my hand when i make a glancing strike when chopping with the replacement outdoor axe because the shape of the handle is so round the whole way though with no fawnsfoot. This handle ergonomically seems to be a much more comfortable design to me!!! Excellent job @MJGEGB!!!
     
  41. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter

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    That fawns foot came out beautifully, Matt. Really nice job.
     
  42. batmanacw

    batmanacw Supporter Supporter

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    beautiful work!
     
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  43. Crooked Penguin

    Crooked Penguin Supporter Supporter

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    I thought it was odd they include one because from the factory these axes don't come with a metal wedge installed to the best of my knowledge. But it is nice to have one just in case you need it I guess.
     
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  44. Primordial

    Primordial Supporter Supporter

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    Impressive! GREAT JOB!!!!
     
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  45. tobiism

    tobiism Supporter Supporter

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    so pretty!
     
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  46. brionic

    brionic Blissful simpleton Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Alright Mr. DeMille, I'm ready for that pass around!
     
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  47. Kelly W

    Kelly W Scout

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    Looks fantastic
     
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  48. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Okay well due to school and such I haven't really had a chance to mess with the Gransfors Outdoor axe any more, but I did snap some crappy pictures, all the good light is wasted during work hours :17: so I apologize for the poor quality photos.

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor & Vaughan 4 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor & Vaughan 2 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor & Vaughan 3 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    [​IMG]GB Outdoor & Vaughan 1 by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    Yup I had to take some pics with one of my personal favorites, my Vaughan Sub Zero Sportsman's Axe. I'm hoping to do a quick video comparing the two at some point while I have the Outdoor axe in my possession. Now back to course work so I can get to mucking about with this axe for the rest of the week.
     
  49. Kelly W

    Kelly W Scout

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    Are you going to send that one along in the pass around? That's a really nice looking little chopper. ")
     
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  50. Jacob

    Jacob Supporter Supporter

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    Wow, that Vaughan is tiny. I’m excited to hear your opinion on the GB. It’s been one of my all time favorite tools for a year or so but I don’t have a lot to compare it too. I’d also like to thank you for sharing this process and your thoughts on grain/wedges etc... it’s been educational so... thanks!

    @Crooked Penguin, thanks for sharing that replacement handle. It’s way cheaper than what I could find awhile back.
     

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