Hammocks are out! Where to go from there... Cots?

Discussion in 'Sleep Systems' started by Stophel, Jun 10, 2019.

  1. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    I have tried. For years I tried. Hammocks. I love how I can camp almost anywhere. On the hillside. Rocky ground. Anywhere there are two trees the right distance apart. It's quick. It's easy. It's lightweight. I can even stay warm when it's cold. No problem. But I just can't sleep in the damn things. It gets worse every time I try. They squeeze my shoulders, they crook my neck, I can't lay on my side, I get cramps in my legs, I can't do anything with my arms, and I stay awake ALL night long. Well, I spent my LAST utterly miserable night in a hammock last weekend. I laid there for as long as I could stand, and finally got up at 4:30 a.m. to strike camp, so when I was packed up, it would be light enough to hike out. I considered packing up before then, and trying to hike out by flashlight...

    I know, people will say "but, you didn't try this type of hammock, or that type of hammock, and you need to spend even MORE money!" I refuse to spend one more thin dime on hammocks or hammock accessories, hoping that maybe something will work. It really shouldn't be that difficult.

    So, I got myself a little mesh "tent", with a nylon floor and mesh sides, and I can put my tarp over that, giving me a nice "room" that will be relatively bug and dirt free (an idea that I really like), and still have decent airflow ventilation (all you people talk about camping when it's 20, 10, 0 degrees or below out... how about when the "lows" are in the 70's and humidity is off the scale?... welcome to Kentucky). I'll try it next time I go out, hopefully in a few weeks, and see how I do with a Zlite pad with a (relatively) inexpensive air pad on top of that.

    Which brings me to cots. I have found VERY LITTLE here about the ultralight cots, and I wonder if any of you use one, and what do you think of it? I LOVE the idea of being off the ground, even if just a little bit, and the idea of a cot appeals to me greatly. However, I'm huge, and I sleep on my side. Some reports say that this is not a great combination. I'm wondering if there is anything out there that might work for me without my shoulders or hips grinding into the frames or ground. I know some of these can be VERY expensive (to me, I'm poor), but I'm nearing the point of just doing it, because I have spent so much money on other stuff that don't work, I'd like to just be done with it. I also don't want to waste even more money on a cot that doesn't work, so any help will be appreciated...
     
  2. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    I can't give any advice on cots, especially not Ultralight ones which to my knowledge there aren't too many options and aren't too light or cheap. They also don't get you off the ground by much.

    I personally use and love air mats. One is 2" and the other 2.5". I'm 235 lbs and 5'10" and don't bottom out on either. If you have an REI near by they generally have different models that you can try out at their stores. It might be a good option to try out something before spending any more money.

    If I prioritized getting off the ground a bit more than weight I'd probably be looking at something like the Thermarest NeoAir Camper which is a 3" thick mat.

    Edit when I think about UL cots ones like this one on Amazon, click here come to mind. It's 3.3 lbs and apparently not rated to hold my weight.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019
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  3. Gascozark

    Gascozark Tracker

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    I’m a side/stomach sleeper and I’ve always been afraid to try hammocks for some of the very reasons that you listed....

    Following this thread....
     
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  4. Pharmer

    Pharmer Supporter Supporter

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    A bridge hammock is about as close as you’ll get to a cot without actually having a heavy bulky cot. Look at the warbonnet ridge runner to start with or search bridge hammock and you’ll get the idea.

    I could see a cot working fine car camping etc. I’ve seen some that are similar to the folding camp / sports chairs.

    I don’t think you’ll find a cot light enough to pack on trail though. If you do let us know. Thermarest (I think) used to make one that was really low to the ground maybe you could find one. I’m not sure if they still make it.
     
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  5. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    I have the older Luxurylite made Ultralight Cot, the model now made by Thermarest... got it off Craigslist. Its decent. Really annoying to put it together, its sort of like those old steel framed camp cots that had spring steel bow legs... except, the legs require a lot more pull than a normal cot does. Total package with all the pieces weights just about 3 lbs, and says supports up to 325-350 lbs, but the wear areas where the polymer legs clip into the frame.. those are the weak spots.. granted the one I got was heavily used and very old, might have been the age that did it in.... there are Chinese made copies on Amazon for less money, but I would NOT trust the materials they use for the legs or the fabric. Theres 2 kinds of poles used on this cot; the big aluminum poles for the sides, and the tent pole like pieces for the leg bows. Because of these pieces and the fabric, they got the weight way down compares to the old steel frame ones.
     
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  6. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    I have been looking at everything I can find (which isn't much). There are ultralight cots that are about 3 pounds or even less, but they seem sized to fit the average 12 year old girl (of 60 years ago). There are two or three that seem large enough that might work for me, and they're all in the 4 pounds and change range. I'm not an ounce counter, but naturally, I don't want to carry too much weight. But at 4 1/2 pounds, I'm seriously considering it.

    I can make it with pads and air mats, I'm just wishing there was a better option.
     
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  7. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    There just aren't a lot of real light cots (under 4 lbs) because there isn't much of a market for them, since air pads and foam mats are much lighter and provides the insulation for some of them... most cots requires additional insulation anyhow. For large dudes like I, there are very few options... even the one I use, is only 22 inches wide, but it is 6 ft long so it fits me somewhat. What would be nice is if Thermarest would make a wider one, but that could bring weight up a lot more due to the bow leg sections needing to be longer. I however can get quite comfortable in my hammock, with underquilt....both of which are self made. I've never been able to get comfy on a 3/8" mat if it isnt on a cot.
     
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  8. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    I have looked at bridge hammocks.. and I still see problems. First off, their weight rating barely catches me, which isn't inspiring. They say that shoulder squeeze is still a potential problem, especially for larger men. And while they all say they provide a "truly flat lay", when I look at photos of people laying in them, I see that they definitely ain't flat. Down in the middle and neck-crunchingly up on the ends (if a hammock just lifted my head up, that would be fine.. but it also presses DOWN on the top of my head, which isn't fine).
     
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  9. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    Are you able to make use of natural materials like wooden poles around the areas you are going? If so, it may be possible to make a stretcher bed with a piece of fabric that you bring along.. depending on how big and heavy you are. Theres some interesting DIY bridge hammocks for big big people.. but all the same, it seems the refrain is "get the largest gathered end hammock you can afford", in sizes ranging from 12 to 14 feet, and over 5 ft to 6 ft wide with a very few being 7 ft wide..
     
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  10. Noblesavage

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  11. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    My bunk bed in my camper is about 27" wide, and I can sleep on that fine (pretty well, actually), but I can't see me sleeping on anything any narrower. Most of the ultralight cots are like 24" or less. Um, nope. And I just don't trust the fly-by-night companies with goofy names straight from China (several of them are exactly the same, just with different brands.. and prices). Thermarest makes an ultralight cot that might be alright for me, but I don't know about the width... or the height. So low that I could foresee my shoulder or hip protruding down and bottoming out on the ground. They also make an XL sized mesh cot that is 30" wide. It weighs 4 pounds and something. It is very low to the ground, like only 4" high. It is also blue (not a positive attribute, as far as I'm concerned).

    There is also the Alps Mountaineering Ready Lite cot. 28" wide, 300 lb weight rating, and 7 1/2" high. Weighs either just under, or just over 5 pounds...depending on who you listen to. This thing is actually lookin' really good to me. I'm not super happy with the weight, but honestly, I could never expect it to be any lighter.
     
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  12. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    Making a stretcher bed in the woods might be a fun project, but not something you can rely on being able to do.

    I have to make or modify EVERYTHING to get it to work for me, and I'm pretty burnt out on it, so I have zero desire to make my own hammock or anything else. And I'm absolutely through with hammocks, period.
     
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  13. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    I hear you on that. I have not gotten a response back from Thermarest on if I could get replacement fabric for the Luxurylite cot I have, so it looks like sewing up one would be my option... since I'm gonna need to sew up replacement fabric, may as well as tweak the sizing a bit, and add bug netting to it ya know?
     
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  14. Noblesavage

    Noblesavage Tracker

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    The thermorest comes in 3 sizes 24x72, 26x77, and 30x77.
     
  15. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    27" is pretty wide for a camp mat. I'm guessing that you are a back sleeper.

    One of the very few upsides to being a side sleeper is that the 20" mat with taper that I now use offers plenty of room for me even being a bigger dude (Obese). And also keeps me from ever bottoming out even with my weight centered on a smaller area. A back sleeper I couldn't imagine having any issues with bottoming out.

    Anyway this may be stupid but the question we always ask at work is, What is the problem that you are trying to solve?

    So far I've got

    • 27" + wide sleeping surface
    • Packable
    • High weight capacity
    • Will not bottom out on the ground
    • Not a hammock
    No idea what will fill all those requirements, but I sure hope you can try some stuff out before spending more $, I know how much it sucks to keep spending money trying to solve the same problem.

    Edit: Just looked out of curiosity, the Camper is available in the size 77" x 30" x 3" at 2 lbs 13oz. Not a cot but it's an option. Didn't realize it came that wide. Most are 20" or 25".
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
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  16. Pharmer

    Pharmer Supporter Supporter

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    Most of their large / long size are 25” wide. You might have overlooked them. I take the weight penalty and go for them as I do not like the mummy shaped or narrow ones either. I’m only 68” tall but it’s hard to find a shorter wide pad.
     
  17. Pharmer

    Pharmer Supporter Supporter

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    Yea they’re not perfectly flat I agree with that. Just wasn’t sure if you were familiar.

    Sounds like you’re down to possibly a large pad or a cot of some sort. I’m glad some guys knew what I was talking about with the thermarest cot. It might not suspend you off the ground from what I can remember it was only a couple inches off the ground.

    Did you search rei they have the thermarest camp rest cots on clearance around 4.25lbs.

    A large lightweight pad is going to be 12oz for the uberlite 2.5”x25”x77” which is pretty sweet but pricey at $210. You could double up and put a foam pad under it to provide extra padding and traction. You can save some (a lot) money buy buying something a little heavier.

    Hopefully you can settle on something that will work for you and it doesn’t keep you from going out.
     
  18. TomC

    TomC Supporter Supporter

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    image002.jpg

    Thermarest mats have served us well for a long time but my wife is finding it difficult getting up in the morning. When she's standing, the ground is so far away, when she's laying down, it's too close. Go figure! So we got a trailer like the one above.
     
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  19. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    I can do pads and blow up mats (though getting all the way up and down on the ground is beginning to get a bit harder), just looking for another option.

    I'm 6' 2", 240-some-odd pounds, broad shoulders, thick chest, long arms.

    I can get away with a normal width pad. I generally sleep on my side with my knees up. On a pad, it doesn't matter if my butt hangs off one side a bit and my knees hang over the other side. On a cot that narrow, though, I'd be laying on the rails.

    The attraction that a cot holds for me is the same that drew me to the hammock. It's off the ground, though only a little, and though I wouldn't be able to put it just anywhere like a hammock, the ground underneath still doesn't have to be perfect. ;)
     
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  20. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    Thermarest/Luxurylite cot wouldn't be right for you, because they require a perfectly flat space for all the legs to rest on.
     
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  21. 66drifter

    66drifter Guide

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    sadly you were introduced to hanging in a less than suitable hammock

    i too am large(275#) and sleep on my side which can be accomplished in a hammock that is designed to sleep diagonally resulting in a flat sleep

    Hennessee makes their hammocks to fit different sized & weight hangers

    mine is a Safari Deluxe side zip which came w/ a sewn on bug net and a hex tarp standard

    just sayin...

    as for the cot quest, when i'm not hanging i camp in a 9'x9' canvass tepee w/ a floor side windows that have zip up weather protection inside the bug screen and a fully zipped netting door w/ tie over canvass faps

    my ground sleeping system includes one of the original UltraLite cots(w/ round feet and double cross suspension poles included for big boys) plus an Exped SynMat 9 DLX Pump in addition to temperature appropriate sleeping bag n bankets

    the system's only issue i have is the fabrics make crinkly noises butt since i sleep w/ a CPAP machine the noise doesn't bother me

    a good night's sleep is quite important when one is playing and both my Hennessee and my tepee systems both provide it
     
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  22. gargoyle

    gargoyle Scout

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    I’m curious what set ups you have tried?
    Tent?
    Hammock?
    Pads?

    I’m 6’-4” and weighed 350. Down to 300 now.
    I did the hammock thing because it was
    so much more comfortable than pads or tiny tents.
    But I get it, it ain’t for everyone.
    240 is huge..?:confused:
    Try fitting into stuff at my size!
     
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  23. RiceOnSuede

    RiceOnSuede Scout

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    I know I know, I read youre post, but bridge hammocks have always felt like floating cots to me. Combined with a pad in the double layer, Heavenly. Very differrent from gathered ends. Food for thought....
     
  24. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    Hammocks seem to have actually gotten more and more uncomfortable as I went along. The last time out just killed me.

    My first hammock years ago was a really short Hammock Bliss. Then I got an ENO Doublenest. I used that one for a long while, and I could sleep in it after a fashion, but not well at all. Then an eleven foot Geaux hammock. For a while, I thought it was better. I could (pretty much) lay on my side, but after a while, it just hurt. I would adjust it this way, and think it was better... then it started to hurt. Then I would adjust it that way and think it was better.... then it started to hurt. I can't do anything with my arms. I can't sleep with my arms gripped up around my body like Dracula. And the pressure down on my head... no more. At this point, you couldn't put a gun to my head and get me in a hammock again. :D
     
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  25. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    Perhaps not a bridge, nor a gathered end hammock, but a spreader bar solid fabric hammock would be better somewhat?

    I'll be honest though, I haven't seen much development of lightweight spreader bar hammocks that weren't stupid short and narrow, or netted...my personal hammock is made of 9ft of fabric, but I utilized webbing loops as suspension and that makes it feels longer than really is.. granted I'm only 5'7" and 300ish pounds.
     
  26. Brommeland

    Brommeland Scout

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    I'm built just as you have described yourself and I absolutely cannot use a gathered end hammock. (I've tried everything from Hennessy's to a Warbonnet Blackbird XLC to Dutchware Chameleon, Netless and Half Zip). They all hyper extend my knees and torque my ankles to the point of making them hurt like hell & sleep is absolutely out of the question.

    However, I live in East TN and nothing is flat enough for a tent here unless it has been worked with a 'dozer. I have found two hammocks that work for me - The Warbonnet RidgeRunner and the Amok Draumr.

    Of the two, the Draumr is more comfortable - like sleeping in a bed, but the RidgeRunner is lighter and more compact. The RidgeRunner is also cooler when it is hot and humid because the Draumr needs an airmat to function. The RidgeRunner is warmer in the winter because Warbonnet makes a sock called a Spindrift that totally encloses it. However, for spring, summer (cooler conditions - 70-75 degrees or lower) & fall, the Draumr is the single most comfortable way I've ever found to sleep outside. It is basically an airmat suspended in the air and is fully adjustable like a craftmatic bed - you can lift your knees, sit up like in a chair or elevate your feet, or go totally flat. They also have a new XL model that is supposed to be even more comfortable for big guys. Here's a link:

    https://www.amokequipment.com/collections/all
     
  27. wolffire99

    wolffire99 Scout

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    Have you seen the Lawson hammocks? At 4lbs it's not terrible.

    A0805B6D-0BAF-4ACE-B0E3-9E734E8CB5DB.jpeg
     
  28. perdidochas

    perdidochas Guide

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    I'm a side sleeper, I have no problems with a big enough hammock. The main key, though, is making sure you hang with 30 degree angles.
     
  29. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    It's funny, I talked about this elsewhere too, and the hammock lovers seem to simply not fathom how anyone is not comfy cozy in a hammock like they are, and don't drift off in Paradisiacal slumber like they do, and how I must be doing something wrong, and I need to try more, and buy more, and learn to sleep another way, and hold my mouth right, and finally, one day, I will experience the Nirvana that is Hammock..... I know they're trying to help, but no.

    Now, I've been camping with a hammock for a long time. Probably back to high school, or very shortly thereafter. Around 1990. Back in the Olden Tymes before the internet. Before "Hammock Camping" was a thing (at least as far as I knew). I had an OD Green netting "survival hammock". I would go traipsing out into the woods, and just tie that sucker up anywhere and viola! No campsite selection or preparation required! I could sleep in it ok, though I would probably not ever have called it "comfortable". But when you're 19 years old, you can sleep like that. I remember my only real complaint was that the netting was irritating and would hang on my buttons and everything else. I did that for years. I then went through a long period where I didn't really do any camping at all. When I wanted to get back to it, I wanted a "good" hammock. And there was VERY little information available (straight information is still hard to get... everybody talks in their own special lingo, that they expect you to know already), and very few hammocks available, at least that I could find. I got a Hammock Bliss hammock with a mosquito net attached. I camped in it for a while, and did ok, but found the bug net annoying at times, so I looked for another hammock. Again, there was very little out there that I could find, so I got an ENO Doublenest. I did ok in that too for a while, and though it always was hard to actually fall asleep, once I was, I was alright, more or less. But slowly it began to get more and more uncomfortable. By this time "Hammock Camping" had exploded, and there was suddenly a bewildering array of hammocks and gear available (but still very little usable information!). EVERYBODY was saying how you needed a longer hammock. Width wasn't that important, but length was. Get yourself an 11 foot hammock and you will be in heaven, trust us. So I got one. At first it seemed that I was on the right track. I was even able to lay on my side (which I need to be able to do), though I still couldn't do anything with my arm, but it wasn't cramping my legs sideways and I was ok.... Until I actually tried to sleep in it. Lounging around is one thing, really sleeping is something else entirely. It just got worse and worse, with less and less sleep, and the last time I got absolutely no sleep at all. Not one second. It just hurts.

    At this point, no amount of coaxing or cajoling will convince me that if only I try this other hammock it will work. It might have been wonderful for me 20 years ago, but not now. Just nope. No. Nuh uh. Sorry, Charlie. Forget it.

    I'm ok laying on a mat on the ground. I don't even really need all that much padding, I just need it to not be lumpy! Of course, that requires careful campsite selection and preparation. I'm used to just hiking until the sun starts to go down, and then take a few minutes to find two trees the right distance apart, and bammo, campsite. So, I gotta slow down and take my time more, which probably is a good thing anyway. I was just wondering if any others had tried any of the lightweight cots. And so I'll tell you, I went ahead and ordered one the other night. In fact, I got it today (took like a day to get here!). I was reasonably certain I would be able to sleep on it anyway, not much risk there, it was just whether or not I would want to pack it around, and even if I didn't, I could use it car camping... instead of a hammock! :D So, I figured it was a worthwhile expense however it went. Besides, somebody has to be the guinea pig... :D

    I got the Alps Mountaineering Ready Lite cot. So far, I'm pretty impressed. The frame is all aluminum, no plastic feet or brackets. It seems rather well designed and constructed, and it's about as heavy-duty as it could possibly be for being so light. The fabric is pretty heavy, MUCH heavier than hammock type fabric. One is tempted to wonder if lighter weight fabric could be sewn up for it, which would CONSIDERABLY lighten the weight of the cot, but I don't know if lighter fabric could stand the strain or not. Might be worth a try. Setting it up is easy, though I have read of people saying that it takes too much strength to bow the legs into place. It is stiff, but I had no problem. The given weight is 5 pounds, 4 ounces, which, I believe, includes the equally-heavy-fabric zipper bag, the cot itself I'm sure is under 5 pounds, though I have no scale that could weigh it. Considering that my hammock setup (which I won't be carrying anymore) is probably 2 pounds or so, 4 pounds and something doesn't seem too bad. The cot is just under 28" wide, and with my 2 quart canteen as my pillow, I can lay on my back or my side just fine. The specs say it is 7 1/2" tall, but mine measures 6 1/4" (I think they have changed the design and they're still publishing old specs). When I lay on it, I don't bottom out on the ground. I can still put my hand flat between me and the ground, so it's close, but still good. A lighter person would barely sink down at all.

    I'm actually kind of excited about it. The thought of going hiking and camping and actually being able to sleep!

    I have no good pictures yet, as my camera crapped out on me last night. I just have a crummy cell phone pic.

    cot1.jpg

    Well, I'm gonna "practice" sleeping on it tonight, and do some test packing to see how well it does carrying in my rucksack. Got my fingers crossed!
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
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  30. Brommeland

    Brommeland Scout

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    I guess Kentucky is a lot flatter than Tennessee....'Round here you'd just roll off of it and keep going until you hit an inanimate object......You really should check out the Draumr - it is basically a tree mounted suspended air mat....
     
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  31. chansta

    chansta keeper of the flame Supporter

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    More for a permanent camp, but... I've had good luck creating a raised bed from dead fall, putting a layer between my pad and the timber, and sleeping on that with a tarp above me. It's NOT quick, but it works. Of course after typing this I realize this is not what you need, lol.
     
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  32. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    Well, that's the only real problem. Where I go I'm usually on a hillside! Finding a campsite will be a bit more difficult!
     
  33. CamoDeafie82

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    Simple solution. Hang the cot itself :D now, that would mean the frame has to be strong... this would be where one of those expandable/collapsible army litters would be of best use, but I think those are not lightweight at all ;)

    As for the fabric... yeah I've been wondering the same. Clearly Thermarest/Luxurylite uses some special kind of laminated grid fabric, which is similar in theory to the X pac type but with another layer of fabric... on the other hand, hammock fabrics have been developed thats pretty strong for their weight, but most of the pressure is taken across the whole width and relatively uniformly at the ends with the ropes/slings used.. however it does seem a bridge hammock uses stronger fabric relative, because of the point stress from the bars... and there is one very expensive "hammock" somewhere, I wanna say Australia or New Zealand? That is basically a perimeter framed cot with suspension. But on a cot, the weight is spread on the long sides, so in theory, the lightweight hammock fabric should be OK in a cot... if its not drum-tight in terms of tension overall.

    Got me thinking though. The thermarest/luxury lite has two aluminum main poles that are hollow.. perhaps with the use of say Amsteel rope in tubular webbing; one could make it more like a stretcher hammock; and not need as much tension on the legs... could suspend it overhead in uneven places.
     
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  34. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    I have thought about making a Hammoccot (hey, I like that, maybe I should trademark that name! :D ) Basically a normal cloth cot bed with tunnels on each side, but running cord through and hanging on trees somehow... which would require four perfectly spaced trees! :eek: Or making it somewhat like a spreader bar backyard type hammock (but with rails or rope on the sides to stiffen it like a cot) to hang it from two trees as normal, adding stabilizer cords to the center of each side to tie out to other trees... :33: I've got some of that dark gray Humwhumpe rope... or whatever they call it, that I could use! I just really don't want to make anything though!
     
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  35. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    Depending on the cot, maybe only need cot fabric separated, and side poles from aluminum pole pieces and mule tape? Be more like a sling or litter but suspended
     
  36. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    I looked at the Thermarest mesh cot, but decided it was just too low to the ground, and I figured I'd be bottoming out on it. I got the Alps cot partly because it's higher off the ground (though not as high as advertised), and I don't bottom out on it! I'm 240-something, and I think much heavier and you'd be touching the ground, but for me, it seems good. And, even if you do bottom out, you won't be hitting the rails underneath, you'd be touching the ground. The Alps legs are on the ground, and there's no cross bar suspended in the air for you to hit. Might be worth you looking at.

    I've always had a hard time sleeping while camping, but it didn't use to be because whatever I was trying to sleep on was hurting me. Here lately though, it just got to be pure discomfort.
     
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  37. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    I didn't bottom out, nor did I hit the cross-bars on the old Luxurylite Ultralight Cot; even at 300lbs, so that's saying something about how sturdy the basic design is :)
     
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  38. hidden_lion

    hidden_lion Supporter Supporter

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    I have a nice cot from moon lence. It puts together easy, is compact and light weight ( not ultra light) at 10lbs. You have 2 height options and it is comfortable, even without a pad. Costs about 99.00 on amazon
     
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  39. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    Hope the new cot works out for you. A good night's sleep can make or break you in my opinion. Let us know how the first night out goes.
     
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  40. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    I slept on my cot inside last night for part of the night. Not too shabby! Fell asleep right away and plenty comfortable and normal! The only reason I got up was the fan was blowing air under me and I got cold because I didn't have a pad or anything under me! :D
     
  41. BradGad

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    So sleeping on the ground is right out?
     
  42. Stophel

    Stophel Scout

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    No, I can sleep on pads on the ground, I'm just looking for options.
     
  43. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Bushmaster

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    I was going to point out that you would still need a pad with the cot, but figured you already knew that from your time with hammocks. I'm guessing anything colder than 60° you'd probably want a pad.
     
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  44. Burncycle

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  45. CamoDeafie82

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    You'd still need actual insulation below and I don't see what they weight, but if its anything like the normal air beds, these are very heavy for what they are...
     
  46. RiceOnSuede

    RiceOnSuede Scout

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    This is my floating cot (not my pictures but i have the same thing for car camping)

    Capture+_2019-06-14-19-40-38.png Capture+_2019-06-14-19-40-47.png
     
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  47. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    That's the one I was thinking of...Doesn't that one use like 4-6 bars in total? Looks pretty comfy from here....
     
  48. RiceOnSuede

    RiceOnSuede Scout

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    Just 2 bars that break down in half for packing easier.
    Ive used mine for the last 10 years now. It is glorious. Its my go to for car camping. I put a pad in the pad pocket, throw in my big ol Wiggys sleeping bags, leave the fancy UL quilts at home, amd throw in my pillow of my bed from home, HEAVEN!

    btw, thats the Jacks R Better bear mountain bridge ha.mock.
     
  49. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    Really. huh. I thought it was the one I was thinking of... the pictures you showed, does NOT look like the Bear Mountain bridge hammocks I've seen in use... .. The thing that's different is the fact that it looks like it's a box/bath tub sewn construction with a foam floor panel.. and even with the person in it, it doesn't look like theres much tension pulling down on the ends below the spreader bars.
     
  50. RiceOnSuede

    RiceOnSuede Scout

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    Thats the air pad he put in the pad pocket in the pics. Makes a difference
     
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