Hanging Meat on a Tree

Discussion in 'Food' started by RickWA, May 24, 2019.

  1. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    I know this might be seen as something for the Media forum, but I want to bring attention to the meat.

    I really enjoy the videos of Rune. He's very artistic in his videography.

    But, he does this thing where he hangs slabs of meat on a short tree branch when he sets up camp and leaves it there, out in the open, until he's ready to cook it. I even saw in one video where he left a chunk overnight like that.

    He's obviously in an area where predators aren't a concern.

    I can't help but wonder about the possibly of it spoiling, being left in the open like that. Or perhaps he just does it when the weather is cold enough to keep it fresh enough for an overnighter.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Here's a little sample. I've never seen anyone use an axe poll as a meat tenderizer before. :33: Jump to 7:00 and just watch for a couple minutes.

     
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  2. kronin323

    kronin323 the barbarian Supporter

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    I don't watch a lot of youtube, in fact I barely watch any, but I've seen one of his vids and he did this. Wha-wha-whaaaat?

    He's gotta be in a pretty cold clime. My first reaction was the same as yours, over here that'd be a predator attractant; I don't know where he is where he doesn't have to worry about that. But even without predators, it'd attract insects, don't you think? Flies, ants, etc. Unless it's too cold for them? IDK, I've seen people dry aging skinned carcasses hanging from a tree in their back yard during hunting season and they attracted, of all things, leeches... But that was in netting hanging from a rope, not a slab of meat up against the trunk.

    Down at a microbial level, if the temperature is 40°F or below then it's outside of what's called the "temperature danger zone" in the food service / health department industry. Won't keep indefinitely but should be safe to eat, lacking other contaminants, for longer than mere hours, almost like being refrigerated...

    I didn't watch the vid you posted; I recognized the guy without it. But the one I saw (perhaps it was that one), it didn't show how he packed the meat. He pulls out different gear here and there to do different things and suddenly he's got a giant slab of steak and later a whole chicken. That surprised me as much as how he stored it - what, did he just have those stuffed in his pack? How were they packaged?
     
  3. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    He's in Denmark. And I believe he's in a coastal woodland.

    And yeah, even if predators weren't a problem, I would be concerned about bugs. But, he does appear to be recreating pre-industrial times. Lots of old school stuff. He makes a lot of his own gear in a rustic non-electric blacksmith shop.
     
  4. Wendy Owens

    Wendy Owens Scout

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    High quality aged beef is stored in low humidity at 53°f for days. How many hang deer overnight before processing? We've become so dependant on refrigeration we don't know the actual qualities of our food anymore.
    Red meat, even that showing signs of deterioration can be eaten safely in emergencies if it is cooked thoroughly.
     
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  5. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    That's what intrigues me. How did our ancestors live without refrigeration and modern day packaging? I know smoking and salting were common ways of preserving meat. This guy has been doing this for quite some time, so it must be reasonably safe. The meat he's using appears to be untreated and raw.


    I saw one video where he just pulled it out of a billy pot type container.
     
  6. kronin323

    kronin323 the barbarian Supporter

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    There are many examples of cuisine these days that originated as a form of food preservation. I don't even know where to start, there's so many. Even seasonings - it's said black pepper's original popularity was because (medieval times) it masked the flavor of rotting meat...

    One should note there's a difference between infection/contamination and spoilage. The former is more about food safety while the latter is more about food quality.
     
  7. Tangotag

    Tangotag Field Gear Junkie Bushclass I

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    My friends father used to hang his hide removed deer carcass up in a tree for about 2 weeks after deer season. He enjoyed a very strong flavored meat. He would only wrap the deer in cheese cloth prior. After that he would pull it back down and process it. Our typical weather the is normally 25F-35F for a high that time of year.
    I grew up, family taught, you had your deer processed and in the freezer before making dinner with the tenderloins.
     
  8. Paul Caruso

    Paul Caruso Being all that I am. Supporter

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    What about biltong. It is raw meat that is hung a then eaten without cooking.
     
  9. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    Reminds me of a backwoods guy I know that hangs his deer carcasses in the fall and just goes out and slices off a hunk to cook when he gets hungry. They are there for months in his backyard. It's mostly cold then but still seems risky. Plus the red squirrels are eating on them too.
     
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  10. gila_dog

    gila_dog Supporter Supporter

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    There are a lot of skills shown in that video. But having a few modern tools really made a difference for him. The axe, the knife, the boiling pot a striker for his flint. And something to kill that meat with. Without those things he wouldn't have survived long enough for bad meat to kill him. I've hung deer and elk in a tree overnight, and for a few days, with no problems. It depends on the weather being cool. Are predators and scavengers attracted to the meat? You bet. We had a deer we left in a tree overnight get half eaten by a bear a few years ago. But what's the alternative? With the time (late PM) we had, and the equipment we were carrying (rifles and knives, a bit of nylon cord, no big trees), we couldn't lift it off the ground high enough to prevent it. Will the meat spoil? Will flies get on it? In warm weather, sure. In cold weather, no. That's why hunting in late fall is the best time for harvesting meat.
     
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  11. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

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    average life span of our ancestors was 30-40 yr old, lots of factors in that but food/water related illnesses was part of it
     
  12. CountryRoots

    CountryRoots As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord

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    Bolting is more of a pickling process... and regarding deer, if the high for the day is below 45F, I will always hang the deer for a week minimum, two weeks max, before I process it.

    My in-laws thought the tenderloin we served them was beef, and he’s processed many a deer in his lifetime too!
     
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  13. Paul Caruso

    Paul Caruso Being all that I am. Supporter

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    Not necessarily, if look at people that made it to adulthood their lifespan was quite a bit longer. If you factor in childhood diseases and death in childbirth I think it would change the stats. Look at vaccine-preventable diseases as well, which have nothing to do with refrigeration.

    Who wants to live to be old and demented anyway? Wait, what were we talking about again?
     
  14. kronin323

    kronin323 the barbarian Supporter

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    Right, biltong is marinated in vinegar, that is a preservative step.
     
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  15. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    I've seen evidence supporting both ideas, concerning the high death rates of children as it figures in to average life span. I've also watched archaeological documentaries where it was considered unusual to find skeletons that showed ages over 40.

    30 to 40 years. That means you would be middle aged when you were 15-20. :confused:



    I guess "modern" is a relative term, but those items have been used by humans for millennia.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_striker
     
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  16. SavageJak

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    As far as US Food Safety Regulations are concerned (and they are stricter than need be obv.), raw meat can stay above 45 degrees F for as much as 4 hours without any real danger. That is for a commercial kitchen or restaurant. If you are aging red meat, anything below 55 degrees is acceptable if the humidity is controlled. Fairly safe to do as he does for short periods of time. I personally wouldn't go over 6 hours at 50 degrees or higher and less as the temp climbs. (former Chef)
     
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  17. Paul Caruso

    Paul Caruso Being all that I am. Supporter

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    Yes, I have seen the competing theories as well; but I guess it also depends on what time period we're talking about.
     
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  18. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    Time period and location. Some parts of the world are harsher than others. If you think about it, it's rather amazing how we humans are capable of surviving in so many different environments. People walking around in loin cloths in tropical regions, and others wrapped up in Caribou hides in the Arctic.
     
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  19. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    Watching another one of Rune's videos and he hung a fish on a tree, ate part of it, left it overnight, and ate more the next day.

    [​IMG]





    I've also noticed him drinking water straight from lakes and streams. This guy must have iron guts. :eek:
     
  20. JeffG

    JeffG Guide

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    Bird guano not withstanding, E.coli, Salmonellosis, Cryptococcosis, oh my.... You know a chickadee will land on that meat or fish within 5 minutes...
    Red squirrels and chipmunks carry the usual bouquet of tularemia, typhus, plague, and ringworm,and henta virus. I think romanticizing food safety for the sake of 1850's posing is foolish.
     
  21. JeffG

    JeffG Guide

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    ^^^ This. Whenever possible.
     
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  22. Jetjr

    Jetjr Scout

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    I almost always leave deer hang for a couple days depending on temperature. To my way of thinking his fresh meat and our grocery store fresh meat may be two totally separate things.
     
  23. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    And he does cook the meat thoroughly, or smokes it to nice and crispy. Still begs the question, how did our ancestors handle their meat? I saw a clip of Cody Lundin once scavenge some meat from a carcass he found frozen in the snow and cook it and eat it.

    Humans have not only been hunters and gatherers, they have also been scavengers.

     
  24. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Very interesting subject, one I've thought about a good bit.
     
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  25. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    I don't know... I'd like to give him the benefit of the doubt.

    He's obviously very creative with his videography, but I like to think he's sincere. It could be that he genuinely has the ability to live that lifestyle. We, in our modern world, have become so sterilized and "clean," it's hard to imagine preparing food with calloused hands and dirt under your finger nails. o_O
     
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  26. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue —- Roughian #7 -— --- Graybeard -— Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I’ve been through markets in lots of countries and it isn’t unusual to see meat hanging... all sorts of meat and animals. Part of the equation may also be that WE are too sensitive to some things that others aren’t. Possibly from being isolated from too many things?
     
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  27. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    Yup, been to open markets in the Philippines where you had to shoo the flies away from the meat in order to pick your cut.
     
  28. PrimitivePotato

    PrimitivePotato Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I know it isn't the safest option but when I was younger (9-12ish) I used to drink out of the farmers streams and creeks all of the time, never had any problems. Even now my local scout group when they are camping on one of the leaders (scout master?) farms we source our water from a spring on his farm, don't boil it or anything... Strengthens the immune system :D:confused:
     
  29. Raymond Eisele

    Raymond Eisele Scout

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    You never have a problem, until you have a problem. With stuff like this, tend to go with my gut reaction.. my gut says always refrigerate your meat.
     
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  30. CSM1970

    CSM1970 Supporter Supporter

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    We were taken to an outdoor eatery in Taiwan. Our first task was to select a cut of meat for the hotpot and the meat was piled up on a bloody wooden table for our perusal. The proprietor of this establishment thoughtfully provided an employee whose job it was to swish the flies away from the meat. At least whenever a customer came by. And in between cigarettes. The meat had been butchered with a hand grenade and none of the cuts could be recognized as to origin so we just picked one off the middle of the pile. We were seated on the sidewalk next to a busy street. No table or chairs. They brought our meat cut up and a big bowl of semi fresh vegetables. We added the water to the pot and turned up the gas on the stove to just below “incinerate “ and let it boil for 30 minutes or so. Evidently our sterilization process worked as nobody was sick.
     
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  31. oddjob35

    oddjob35 Scout

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    Several points on this ….

    1) I quote from a quick search on google "Denmark has 10 species of carnivora including otter, fox, weasels, martens, badger, mink and very few wolves, but no bears. ..."

    2) So unlikely to be anything big enough to get his meat hanging out on a tree there. He also appears to be fairly close to the coast so that possibly means less chance of wolves that would probably be more inland, though that is just a guess on my part!

    3) The climate/season is pretty cool. You can see the hail happening at about 4:25 in the video linked in the OP. So low likelihood of flys etc.

    4) Implies temperatures well within range for hanging meat.

    5) Aging meat by hanging in cool dry conditions is a standard practice for helping develop flavor. Especially fresh killed game when you want the stronger "gamey" flavor to develop. From Wikipedia "Meat hanging is a culinary process, that improves the flavor of meats by allowing the natural enzymes in the meat to break down the tissue through dry aging. The process also allows the water in the meat to evaporate, thus concentrating the flavor."

    6) As a younger man (probably early 20's) on a trip to the coast for a day of fishing, I left home early and managed to kill a pheasant which ran in front of my car whilst on the way. My grandmother took said pheasant (I DID recover my roadkill) and got my grandfather to hang it in their outbuilding for about 3 or 4 days before she prepared it for cooking. That was one tasty meal when we got to eat it.

    7) One thing that is more a commentary on my part as a Brit for 60 years before coming to the USA. The USA does seem to have a surprisingly short "sell by" date on some things and people seem to be VERY mindful of those dates and to throw out (what many would still call perfectly good food) anything that is even a day over the "sell by"! I can only assume (yeah dangerous I know!!) that some of these shorter dates are because in the USA they have to legislate to the lowest common denominator so, something that may keep a few weeks in all actuality in the more Northerly parts of the country, may only be able to keep for a single week when faced with the heat of the more Southerly states. Consequently the whole country gets a "sell by" date of only one week. With meat I have always worked on the principle of if it don't smell "sour" or rotten then, as long as it is thoroughly cooked (definitely not rare!!), it will probably be fine. Though I would add that any meat that was on the older side I have always cut up into smallish pieces and turned into some sort of stew so that it does get well cooked through. I would also agree that there are some things even I don't mess with, like poultry and seafood!

    Just some thoughts.

    OJ
     
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  32. RickWA

    RickWA Supporter Supporter

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    Now, that is something I would love to see. :eek:



    I think it was George Carlin who did a little comedy routine once...
    Husband: Honey, what's this stuff in the refrigerator.
    Wife: What does it look like?
    Husband: I'm... not sure.
    Wife: Smell it.
    Husband: It... doesn't smell like anything.
    Wife: It's good!

    :D
     
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  33. Akela

    Akela Scout

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    Some folks used to, and some still do, home-can chunks of meat in Bell canning jars just like some home-can fruit and vegetables.
    I still occasionally hunt with a pair of old-timers who remember as youngsters having venison steaks stored in a couple Weir #5 stoneware jugs that were sunk in a deep cool hole in the creek (tied to a tree with a rope) nearby their childhood homesteads. They thought that was real handy, and as teenagers, would grab the rope, raise the jug, pop the top, stick their hand in and grab a steak, re-seal and re-sink the jug in the creek, and make a small cooking fire to roast a steak when they got to feeling hungry during the day.
     
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