Help me reduce my gear weight

Discussion in 'Backpacking' started by LouisCho, Aug 29, 2015.

  1. LouisCho

    LouisCho Scout

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    Hello!

    Couples weeks ago I wanted to go on a 3 days backpacking trip. Overall the trip did not turned to go so well and I decided to came back after 1 night. There was many factors that have been building up which have led to that decision, I was under stress in my life for some time, the trip have been prepared in a rush and I had a back pain for some days... Anyway!

    Another very important factor was the weight that I was carrying. I have not much experience in solo trips so I think I overpacked and the whole experience was not as enjoyable that could have been with a more reasonable pack weight. I would really need some help from more experienced solo treckker.

    So back home I took the time to weigh every single item in my pack and on me. I made a spreadsheet to class them all according to their function. I uploaded that Spreadsheet in Google Drive, there is the link:
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7k_Ul7FQgK9XzJtZGFJdXVCRGc/view?usp=sharing

    If you want, you can add a column at the end with your handle name and put an X where you would drop the item or just add a comment. At the end, if an item got many X, that would mean that I really have to let it at home!

    Some things to take in consideration:
    - 3 days in backcountry. No trails, no camp site.
    - day 2, 370m ascent
    - day 3 climb down 640m, very steep, hard on knees
    - About 9km in total
    - I planned to fish both night at the campsite
    - I was solo.
    - I am 6'1". Not overweight but not muscular. I could be in greater shape but I can take some weigh on me.
    - I was sleeping in a hammock because the density of the wood make it difficult to find a place to sleep on the ground.
    - Nights can drop down 50-56 F (around 10-15 C)

    Here the link to the thread in T&E forum
    http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php/154531-Aborded-3-days-back-country-trip

    I hope you will find this is a useful exercise. I sure appreciate everybody participation.

    Thanks
     
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  2. FreudianSlip

    FreudianSlip Guide

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    Maybe ditch the cutting board, some of the spare bear deterents, and water filtration if you have time to boil water.
     
  3. DCP

    DCP Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    For me the biggest weight save is in sleep system and the pack itself looks similar in your case. Those are often expensive to lighten up. For quick wins I would eliminate the cutting board, plate and charred line
     
  4. jeremyctry

    jeremyctry Outdoorsman Supporter Bushclass I

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    I am not affiliated with the owner of this site and I do not endorse the sales portion of his site, but there is a lot of great info on Ultra Light gear, and shows what types of gear and food to pack to really cut weight.

    http://www.hikelight.com/gearlist.html

    I am in the process of making some drastic changes to my own kit I can still hump a 60 lbs ruck and keep up with all the scouts and other leaders, but I am getting older and its not as easy as it used to be and my knees hurt alot more. That being said 2 things I would drop right off the bat would be the cup and the bivy at those temps unless soaking wet I wouldn't even need the sleeping bag and won't need the bivy because your in a hammock with a tarp. your pot can serve to cook and drink out of. next would be fishing rod, If I where planning to subsidize my food with fish would bring string a couple bobbers and hooks and improvise a rod there (think cane pole fishing) next would be the sleeping mat I don't have a lot of experience hammock camping but I feel like inside your bag or laying on top of it either way would prevent mosquitoes from getting to you from the underside of the hammock and since you are in a hammock you wouldn't need the padding. I would also ditch the pillow and spoon and plate, pillow for the same reasons as the sleeping pad unnecessary, spoon because you have a spork already, and plate because if you have a cutting board you already have a flat surface for eating off of. Personally I would ditch the cutting board to but thats just me.
     
  5. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    Did you make written or mental notes of the gear if any that you did'nt use? , or if used did you did you have other gear that could double function for same? For example your SS plate and cutting board could easily be replaced by .99 cent rugged lightweight 1 oz. plastic Frisbee and since you have the large Mors pot the SS GSI cup could be replaced with a 1 oz. large folding Swedish army folding rubber cup. I somewhat question the need for the bivy bag since you have tarp/hammock/sleeping bag anyway since a bivy is the on ground substitute for a tarp.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
  6. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    I really like how you set up your spreadsheet with a "% of total" column. Really helps clarify the load.

    First thing that stands out is that almost a quarter of what you carried was the weight of the pack itself. There will be discussion, but personally, I try to keep my gear weight to about 15-17lbs, allowing me to use an ultralight-style pack weighing about a pound and a half, with 10-15 more lbs of food for a 5-7 day trip still coming in at under 30lbs.

    Other items I question in one way or other are:

    Flagging tape- Only if I'm actively exploring a new area to deer hunt, and need the markers later.

    Lantern- You have a headlamp already. Up to you.

    "Fire stick"- is this a lighter or ferro rod? or a fuel of some sort?

    Get the smallest bottles of sunscreen and mosquito repellent you can for weekend trips.

    Not much you can do about the compass and GPS... I don't always carry both, but I do always carry a 1oz fisheye compass.

    13oz for bear spray seems heavy, but I know nothing about lighter alternatives. Same with bear bangers.

    Your FAK seems heavy. I'm a minimalist... meds, bandaids, and that's about it. Mine weighs about 4oz.

    Emergency blanket. I don't carry one. Up to you.

    You seem to have both a ground system and a hammock system. Pick one. The lightest you can get will be a silnylon tarp, down sleeping bag, air mattress/pad, and mosquito headnet. Convenience and utility will dictate how you actually work that out for yourself.

    Tools are another "you need to decide" area. I always carry at least a pocketknife whenever I'm in the woods. I might or might not carry a sheath knife on a backpacking trip (depends on how hard it is), a bowsaw and axe for canoe camping, and a hatchet and folding saw for easier backpacking. Never saw a use for a multitool.

    Water filter. 12oz is too heavy imho. I use iodine prills (Polar Pure). Some people don't like the taste. They can use Aqua Mira (but it's not as simple as iodine).

    You can always rig up 3 rocks to make a decent "stove" in Canada. You can also carry a couple 12" rods or pipes for a grill, or an even lighter set of chains with hooks.

    I like the Mors pot. there are lighter alternatives, but they're smaller, and I hate making 3 pots of water (meal, tea, and washing up). You also can barely wash a pair of socks in a smaller pot.

    Spork. Ok. I prefer a lexan tablespoon.

    GSI Stainless Cup. I prefer a plastic/lexan mug. won't burn your lips, lighter.

    Trangia alcohol stove and fuel. Heavy. Research the SuperCat alcohol stove if you need a rainy-day backup.

    Stainless plate- I use a KoolAid container and cozy to rehydrate my meals in. Weighs about the same.

    Cutting board- use a piece of firewood, log, canoe paddle, or get one of those roll-up pastry boards.

    Wooden spoon- Redundant to the spork. Pick one.

    Camelback bladder-good choice and weight for the volume. Soda bottle comes close. I like the old Aqua Fina wide-mouth 3oz bottles, but they don't make them anymore. I have had to go to Gatorade (5oz, iirc) bottles now. I also have a 2 liter Platypus bladder that weighs about 3oz. Makes a decent camp reservoir when i'm backpacking, and doubles as an air pillow.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
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  7. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    Ditch the bivvy bag. You have the sleeping bag, tarp and hammock so the bivvy is just extra weather protection you don't need, imo.
     
  8. Rubicon_Dave

    Rubicon_Dave Scout

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    Here's my 2 cents on things to drop out of the pack and my reasoning why...

    • UCO lantern: you already have a head lamp so this is redundant
    • Flag tape: unless you're blazing a path for another person in your party I don't see the need for it.
    • GPS: You have a compass already so with a good topo map and some knowledge the GPS isn't necessary.
    • Bear bang: You already have bear Spray
    • Bivy Bag: You have a tarp and paracord, so you already have a shelter. In my experience the bivy doesn't add much in warmth and at 50 degrees Fahrenheit it's not needed.
    • Charred Line: I'm not familiar with this...
    • Multitool: If you have a knife and a saw you're good to go. I carried a SOG multitool for years and never used it, it was just dead weight.
    • Water Filter: Boil, or try chemical treatments instead
    • Wood Stove: You have the alcohol stove so this is redundant
    • Trangia: Try a soda can or cat stove (both are alcohol fueled but significantly lighter than the Trangia)
    • Cutting board: you can get by without this one... :)
    • Plate: Redundant, You already have a GSI cup and Mors pot... what more do you need? ;)
    • Wooden spoon: You have a spork already, and a pair of chopsticks or a crude spoon can be whittled up in no time.

    EDIT: I just realized your pack weighs 9 lbs. all on it's own... that's adding to your burden as well.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
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  9. Gruxxx

    Gruxxx Guide Bushclass I

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    1st Round of Things to Ditch (the easy stuff): Flagging tape, cutting board, multi-tool, wooden spoon, bucksaw, and bivy bag (since you're already off the ground in a hammock and under a tarp, and it's HEAVY).

    2nd Round of Things to Consider Ditching or Changing: UCO latern, steel plate, GPS, and charred line. (What is charred line?) Repackage sunscreen in a small bottle and take just a travel sized bottle of bugspray. Do you even need sunscreen in the woods? Is all the bear stuff really necessary? Do you need a pillow to be comfortable in your hammock? I hate to mention fishing gear, since it looks like you're around some great water and actually used it. But if you're still feeling pressed for weight, maybe consider paring it down to just a hand line and a few hooks and split shot instead.

    3rd Round of Things to Consider Upgrading: If you were cold in your hammock, consider upgrading to down quilts. An ultralight pack (like a ULA Circuit) would be ALOT lighter than a military style pack. Not to knock the Eberlestock. It looks like a bombproof pack, but it's a whopping 9.4 lbs.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
  10. dogstar

    dogstar Scout

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    I agree with everything Seacapt said. Use this experience to pare down your gear (ditch what you did not use, and don't foresee using). Try to have all pieces of gear serve more than one purpose (bandana = towel, head covering, scarf, hot pot holder, etc....) If you use a plate, have that double as the cutting board.

    What I did to reduce the weight of my gear was to pack everything I thought I needed, then lay it all out to see what items can be replaced by a single one or what I could live without. There usually is some redundancy to be found. For example, I had a stuff sack and a light daypack, which are really interchangeable. I just put my gear in my daypack and saved 8 oz. Overall, I made two rounds of cuts to get down to a reasonable weight.

    I just did a backpacking trip during which nighttime temperatures varied from 50F to 40F. On the coldest night with 20+ mph winds, I had on a t-shirt, longsleeve polypro layer, fleece top, and rain parka. For bottoms, I had lightweight nylon pants and rainpants in the wind, and thin long johns with pants on while I slept. This is probably all the clothing I need down to freezing point.

    Experience is the best teacher. Just keep working at it; you'll see results soon!
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
  11. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    Just for a rough reference and comparison twice a year I do a 2 day 1 night climb and fishing gig at the top of Tumbledown Mt, and pond at top in Maine during late summer and early fall, elevation about 1600 ft. or 500 meters and overnight temps to low 50s F. I now take the less strenuous but bit longer Parker Ridge trail rather than the quicker more or less straight up Brook trail. My pack is the French Army Combat day pack and total weight is 25-30 lbs. I use a USGI bivy and green patrol bag with cheap cotton Thermals if cold enough and a large plastic Garbage bag I can split open for overhead tarp if heavy rain comes in, no need to carry water as brooks/springs are everywhere and pond at top, food is minimum because of roots, berries and trout in pond but I do carry all my tackle in an altoids tin and have my pack flyrod in a short 18 in. aluminum tube case.

    Late edit: included in my 25-30 load is 5-8 lbs. of un needed but fun to have along gear usually my QRP Ham radio, batteries and lightweight Ruger LCRx 3 in. 38 revolver and ammo. Everything packed in pic F1 day pack
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
  12. CaliforniaCanuck

    CaliforniaCanuck Guide

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    Awesome spreadsheet! My chromebook is having a fit at the moment and this iPad isn't good for spreadsheets but I'll copy and make suggestions later. Love that you weighed everything, that's the first step!

    You have a tarp, hammock, but netting and bivy. All that stuff weighs a lot and probably more than a decent 3-season 2 person tent.

    You mentioned stress in your life, this will be a good distraction and you'll get something positive from it. The more stress I have in my life the more I appreciate bushcraft and the outdoors as a good healthy distraction. What ever you're going thru will get better!
     
  13. Spork

    Spork Supporter Supporter

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    Did you mean Tarred line as in bank line...instead of Charred line?

    I don't see much in significant weight savings except for ditching the bivy and getting a lighter pack. I'm not a hammock user, so I don't know what the total weight of your shelter/sleep system would add up to....and it's difficult for me to relate to in terms of grams.

    Dogstar brings up a good point...over organizing in terms of too many stuff sacks, bottles, containers etc...it can add up.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
  14. eliot loudermilk

    eliot loudermilk Tracker

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    I've only spent a handful of nights in my enlightened equipment revelation 30° quilt, so far I absolutely love. I bought the extra wide and long options and it still weighs in at well under a pound I think.
     
  15. Urban Whittling

    Urban Whittling Scout

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    Everyone approaches these types of trips differently, so I will just point out the items I would eliminate first. Because I have some back issues too, pack weight is really important to me and there are things I don't skimp on like pack comfort and sleeping comfort.

    Things I would drop:
    - the lantern (nice to have but you already have the headlamp)
    - flagging tape
    - I don't use a gps, so that would be dropped for me
    - some or all of the bear items could be dropped to shave weight
    - I would drop either the bivvy or tarp. The tarp is more versatile but is also heavier and blocks the view
    - the big bug net (because of the sleeping bag and head net) but if bugs are bad this would be a mistake
    - the sleeping pad seems heavy but if it is really comfortable, keeps you warm, and helps you sleep...
    - saw
    - charred line
    - multitool
    - water filter
    - one of the stoves
    - spoon
    - plate
    - cutting board
    - pack (this is the only item I think you have to change). I am sure it is built like a tank, but 9.6 lbs is way too heavy for me. I steer clear of overbuilt packs with a lot of Molle webbing because it is so heavy. They usually aren't as comfortable as Gregory, Osprey, or Kelty either.

    Dropping those items and changing the pack would drop roughly 12lbs. As heavier items get replaced, your 3 day load out could easily get below 30lbs with keeping most of the comforts you are used to bringing along.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
  16. ra2bach

    ra2bach Guide

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    dude, you lost me at "spreadsheet"...

    :4:

    I too am a victim of overpacking syndrome. sometimes it's because I carry things I want to try and to compare (cooking gear and stoves are big for me this way) but sometimes I fall prey to the Boy Scout "Be Prepared" motto and end up with the kitchen sink in my pack.

    I bought heavily into the "two is one, one is none" theory early in life but now, I only double (and sometimes triple) up on life critical gear. I carry waterproof matches, a ferro rod, and a lighter. my water purifying methods are boiling, Sawyer Mini filter, and purifying tabs. it may look redundant but to me, removal of the third item in my list would save an inconsequential amount of weight, it's not worth it.

    when I need to conserve weight, I make other gear do multiple tasks. I use to carry a headlamp, a handheld, and a lantern. and for fire tinder I use to carry a magnesium bar, and cotton balls, and jute, and fatwood, and fluff, etc., etc...

    what I carry now is a headlamp and a UCO mini candle lantern. by choosing a headlamp with both a spot and a flood beam, I don't need the handheld and the candle lantern provides enough area lighting to save batteries. the tealight candles do triple duty as tinder and food warming.

    I also got rid of my packs with extra zippers, straps, molle webbing, and attachable external pockets. my packs now have minimal external pockets that hold my quick/convenient-access and my dirty/wet gear, that I don't want mingling with the stuff inside the pack.

    other things I make do double-duty are clothing, stuff saks, and cooking gear. I like zip-off pants that make into shorts. the only thing I carry double of is underwear and wash the used pair each night and I triple my socks in case I step in a creek. I take a lighter sleeping bag and wear my spare clothes to bed. I inflate my clothing dry-sak as my pillow and use my food sak as my bear bag.

    I only take two water carriers, one that I can boil in. I'm getting interested in the Vargo BOT - a titanium bottle that can double as a pot for cooking.

    I don't take my whole tent. in the winter, I take just the fly and foot print. in the summer, I take just the inner net and a tarp.

    I limit myself to a SAK and a medium to large knife. if big wood is on the menu, I take a bow saw instead of an axe.

    I cut down my army sleeping pad for kneeling and sitting on and use it to double up under my hips and shoulders on the remaining portion for more padding when sleeping.

    and so on and so forth...

    mine is not an ultralight method by no means. I still use pots and pans instead of aluminum foil to cook my food. my toothbrush still has the full length handle. I carry too much food and water and my boots have heavy soles. but what it has done is get me thinking how I can do the same things with less weight.

    I don't go to the woods to endure, I go to enjoy. over time, I have come up with methods to balance comfort in camp with comfort on the trail. good luck...
     
  17. Gruntinhusaybah

    Gruntinhusaybah Guide Bushclass I

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    Some great advice so far.

    Some things to think about:
    Is redundancy really neccesary in 50* weather? You could survive the nights in just your clothing.

    I would start by getting a MUCH lighter pack, that thing is crazy heavy.

    One form of cook stove, either wood or alcohol, you can carry an esbit or two for backup if you feel you need to.
    If you can hand a hammock between trees you can sleep between them. A closed cell pad is much lighter than a hammock.

    If you're serious about lightening up really think about what you will need, as opposed to what you want.

    If you can spend some money on new gear you could really reduce the weight of your big 3.
    REI has a 2lb 50* bag for $70
    Gossamer gear pack>2lbs $150
    And if you're willing, the silnylon MEST is 6.5oz for $45

    After that, it's really scrutinizing "the little things", check out mtwardens post on this.
     
  18. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    Which model do you use? I can find product descriptions of "hi power" and "low power", but that's not the same as "spotlight" and "low". This would enable me to drop a small flashlight on certain trips.

    This is exactly in line with my own way of doing things... I hate stuff dangling off a pack. My favorites are a GoLite Gust, GoLite Jam, a German ruck, and I used to have a ULA Circuit or Conduit (could never remember the difference). Also have a frame bergen that I've not tried much yet. Most all of of them have/had one giant internal pouch with a sleeve up the back for a foam pad like you described... frame sheet, kneeling pad, door mat, flame encourager, smoke shield, sun visor, rain hat, extra insulation under the kidneys in a hammock, pillow, sit pad, food prep table...

    On the outside, I like two side pouches for water bottles (or, on canoe trips where I'm wearing boots, you can put a shoe in each one next to the water bottles, or a fuel bottle), and a center pouch for a "junk drawer". That's where everything goes that's small/tool-ish. The interior pouch holds cook pot, food, sleeping bag, tarp, clothes, hammock, air mattress, or whatever else. Dry rain gear goes on top inside. Wet rain gear goes under bungi cords outside.

    The Gust, Jam, and ULA whatever-it-was all weighed about 20oz... Can't see using any pack that weighs more than about 2-3lbs unless I'm carrying something over 40lbs... and if I'm doing that, it's not backpacking; it's work.
     
  19. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    Is the weight right for that pack? Almost 10 lbs!!! That's where I would start for sure. My external frame comes in at 3 lbs even and should be dropping slightly soon.

    Other than that ditch the buck saw and multitool IMO.
     
  20. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    Dave has hit this pretty spot on :)

    No other clothing besides a headnet? rain jacket? insulating layer? beanie & gloves? spare socks?

    clothing is usually one common area where folks tend to overpack
     
  21. tulsa

    tulsa Guide Vendor

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    Take a look at your water. If I read right you are carrying 3 liters. That might be a good thing in some environments but you were walking next to water for almost the entire trip. If I'm near water normally carry a quart which is enough to get me through the next leg of the trip.
     
  22. wizard

    wizard Guide

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    Rubicon Dave hit the same things I would recommend eliminating.

    I own 5 GPS units, 2 auto type and 3 outdoors/hiking type. I nearly never carry them with me unless in some remote, unfamiliar area with no trails or roads. Even then, I always carry a topographical map and a compass. I am schooled in compass nav and prefer it, no batteries, no missetting something and it does not require a startup time.

    I would rather carry one good stove than the wood stove/Trangia combo. I prefer one with a flame adjustment and fuel already in the tank. I most often take my Snow Peak Giga Power canister stove or my MSR Whisperlite for cooler weather trips. If all fails I can still cook on a fire, no need for a metal container for my wood fire. Think weight savings.

    As many others have suggested, lose the 10 pound pack. Besides being built like a tank, what is the advantage? I never hang anything on my packs either and 2+ pounds of MOLLE webbing is just a waste to me. I use a Gregory Baltoro 70 which is a nice OD looking green, I think the newer model is a 75L and green is not an option but black or blue are.

    Bottom line is lose some weight and you'll enjoy backpacking a lot more. I'd be miserable with that much weight for 2-3 days.
     
  23. boisdarc

    boisdarc Scout

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    My sleep system is an old army hammock(the o.d.green net one from the px), a car windshield sunscreen, a walmart sleeping bag(ozark trail cocoon 250), a piece of camo bug screen, two pieces of 550 cord doubled over and knotted every 5 inches, two super thin bungee straps, and an army poncho that can pull double duty, and two mamut sport carabiners. There are people that hammock lighter. My big expense was the bag, I waited until it was on sale for $65. I figure that if it rains, I can't wear a rain fly, but I can wear that poncho. Ponchos aren't very light weight, but so hard to give up. I bring thin underarmor style bottoms and a top. For water, I use one 2 liter bladder, and 2 tall water bottles-nothing special just regular thin wall bottles-yes they will degrade in the sun and heat, but they weigh almost nothing. Hope this helps. Everything I didn't use the year before, I don't pack---except for first aid stuff.
     
  24. ra2bach

    ra2bach Guide

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    I've got a box of headlamps and flashlights and lanterns but right now, the Coast HL7 is what I use if I want a really bright headlamp that allows me to move at night abd leave the flashlight at home.

    it's cheap and it's really bright but it eats batteries. it's also really good for close stuff/low power but it doesn't have a red light. when I use this, I usually have a candle lantern to save batteries around camp.

    but a candle lantern, while nice, is kinda heavy, so I'm starting to think about the Black Diamond Revolt because it has outstanding battery life and it uses both rechargeable and/or regular batteries. It's IPX4 rated for water resistance and has a red light to retain my night vision. it gets OK reviews for long distance but excellent for close stuff and I'm looking at this to maybe drop the candle lantern.

    depending how well it lights down trail, I might supplement it with a small flashlight like the Foursevens Preon 2. this uses 2-AAA batteries and has 3 brightness levels (192 lumens, 26, and 2.2) with Strobe, SOS, and two levels of "Beacon". I like it for camping because it shares batteries with my headlamps and both of these together might be lighter than the Coast HL7 and lantern...
     
  25. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    Thanks... that sounds like what I'm doing now (low/wide headlamp, spotlight flashlight) and it's heavy and eats batteries. I do like to keep them all the same if possible (but it's not... Lights are AAAs, GPS and Camera are AAs.)
     
  26. JMK

    JMK Scout

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    Not much to add to great advice above, but one thing I didn't notice being mentioned was the MSS carrier. It's fairly heavy for its purpose and with that monster Eberlestock on your back I'm not at all certain you need it. Ditch it or replace with a lighter compression bag.

    In the past I've often ditched sleeping bag carriers completely and simply stuffed the bag to my backpack after everything else. Keeps the pack taut and protects the contents. A trash bag is optional if you want some extra protection against rain.

    Like others have said - seriously, look into lighter backpacks. 3.8 kg for a ≈40-liter (2460 cubic inch) pack, yikes! I thought it's against some law to make them that heavy... My indestructible carryall, an old 85+-liter external frame Savotta 906 that's built to paradrop specs, comes only to 2.8 kg when kitted with all the bells and whistles and I thought that was heavy - my go-to 60-liter external frame pack I rescued from a yard sale is about 1.8 kg.
     
  27. LouisCho

    LouisCho Scout

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    Wow thanks for all that replies.

    The pack: is there a post here that nobody told me to ditch it?! I sure will do...The reason I have it is that I had a super special form a local store and I could not said no... I am on a budget for some time and that was the closing argument. Should have think twice next time! It's however very comfortable, much more that the one I had before. It also have a extra large front panel that I just love.

    Sleep system: Seeker is right, I carry both. I wanted to try the hammock because the woods are very dense and its difficult to make a good sleeping area. However, I don't have underquilts so I had to carry the pad that I inflated at 50%. I would love to have an integrated system like the hennessy but thats for later. I will drop the bivy and consider buying a silnylon tarp and put a new sleeping bag on my list. I'll try to keep the ground system as making a complete and good hammock setup can cost over 500$.

    Stove: I will take only the Trangia next time as a rain backup. will consider making a Supercat.

    Bear spray: It's bear country. You folks can carry a gun, I can't. I'll drop the pen.

    Water filter: I'll drop it too and take iodine pills. i will consider mini sawyer if I am not comfortable with ti=his idea.

    Extras: I ll drop the lantern, the kitchen gear, the multi-tool, the rope (which btw was to make some cordage works like tripod)

    GPS: I was in an unknow area. I navigate with a map and compass too but I liked to have a GPS for that trip

    Water: 3l. is too much. I'll reduce it to 2. The day was hot and I like to drink water to keep me hydrated. I hate to refill too often

    FAK: I,ll reduce it too. I think the box is mainly responsible for the weigh and I never realize it. I Think if can find a silnylon pouch I would save about 10oz

    with those changes: I think I will save about 4700 grams (about 10 lbs) to bring down the charge to 35 lbs. There is a lot of reduction possibilities laying in the replacement of some gear, About another 10 lbs reside in the pack, the tarp and the sleeping bag/pad but we talk here of a budget of over 500$. I will however prioritize the pack.

    Again thanks. I'll keep you updated.
     
  28. JMK

    JMK Scout

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    Good progress, though I recommend testing the iodine pills to see whether you can cope with the taste :).

    Fully understand carrying both the hammock and some on the ground option - I do the same since I'm not yet fully comfy with the hammock myself. Do try if you can manage without MSS carrier though.

    Look into used packs, there are great deals in eBay all the time for example. At about 60 liter range there are many, many options, some of which won't even break the bank! For the record, I paid a grand total of 15 euros for the pack I nowadays use the most :).
     
  29. wizard

    wizard Guide

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    Glad to hear you are revising your gear. I find that after every trip I rethink my gear and that goes back over 50 years of hiking. That is the main reason I try to lighten the load now, I am old and I feel a heavy pack a lot more.

    Look into the used pack market like ebay. Good packs for the money are Kelty, usually priced well below Gregory and Osprey. The Keltys packs I have owned always carried comfortable and are well made.

    Keep us posted on how it's going and enjoy your time in the woods.
     
  30. Angus McGunnigl

    Angus McGunnigl Guide

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    Location:
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    Ditch and save:
    Bucksaw - 15 oz. you got a small saw on the multitool
    Emergency blanket - 4 oz. you have a tarp, sleeping bag, etc
    Cutting board - 5 oz. use plate
    Bivy - 28 oz I you got tarp and sleeping bag
    Carry 3L water bag half full - 50 oz. - you have filter and way to boil water, so drink up a lot when you are at water source with filter, carry less
    This so far saves just over 6 pounds.
    Have fun and may each trip be more successful than the last.

    Oops, just saw your list above. You are on the right track. This is a continual learning curve, this outdoors stuff.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2015
  31. Rubicon_Dave

    Rubicon_Dave Scout

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    If you're in the market for a lightweight pack the Mountainsmith Haze 50 is under 2 lbs and can be found for under $100 if you shop around. I like it because it has two zippered pouches on the back for easy access. I don't like packs that look like a sausage casing with shoulder straps because they require you to open the top and dig around for stuff. I like having a few accessory pockets on the outside for first aid and other quick access items.



    You don't need to spend $500... The Eno doublenest is a good size hammock with room to sprawl out and it will only set you back 70 bucks. You don't need an underquilt right away... get a cheap foam pad with some shoulder "wings" taped or glued on the sides and you still have the option to drop to the ground if you want to.

    If you haven't done so already, make sure you check out "Shug" on youtube. He has a great example of the foam pad setup with wings. He also has an entertaining 3 part series on "hammock hanging".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjL4ric6JZc
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2015
  32. Canajun

    Canajun Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    X 2. In an environment like that, I'd take a liter/quart and the ability to filter the rest. You're carrying three times the water you need to (6.6 pounds vice 2.2).


    I don't particularly find 40-45 pounds heavy in a pack. My multi-day pack hovers around the 40 pound mark, but that is with my GB SF Axe, my rifled .30-30 barrel for my 20 gauge, and extra ammo (shotgun and rifle) on top of my sleeping system, food, water, and other snivel kit. It's a comfortable weight to lug for a few days. But having looked at your list (really well done, but the way) there seems to be some unnecessary weight to your pack that would make it very much lighter for you if you ditched some of it. My thoughts as follows:

    Your pack weighs over 9.5 pounds. That's pretty significant, right there. I reckon you could do better. Maybe lose three pounds with a different pack.

    Your sleeping system is crazy heavy. Almost 10.5 pounds! I'm betting you could lose another three pounds there with better gear. My Siltarp weighs seven ounces. Unless you really need the bug net, ditch it. If your'e in your s.bag, why would you need a bug net? Ditch the bivvy bag. Use your pack or your rolled up jacket as a pillow.

    Lose the buck saw. Take a blade and make one when you get to camp. Takes very little time when you get good at it. I've only made a couple; the second one took me around 20 mins and worked great.

    What's wrong with fires? Why two stoves? I say ditch them and the cutting board and save another (almost two pounds).

    I reckon you've saved around 12.5 - 13.0 pounds right there.

    If you went through your gear and looked at where the redundancy was, I bet you could save even more weight. Having said that, a little redundancy is worthwhile. For instance, I only see one light in your list. I'd add another small pen-sized LED as a back-up.

    I'm not seeing a PSK. Presumably, that is on your body not in your pack? That's probably 6 or 7 ounces.

    Good luck with it!
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2015
  33. ra2bach

    ra2bach Guide

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    the Coast HL7 is unique in that there is no hi/lo, it's a continuously variable output via a dimmer lever on the battery pack. and there's no spot/flood beam as it has zoom focusing via a twist knob on the lens.

    it claims 285 Lumens and while I can't confirm that, it's easily as powerful as my weapon mounted lights with as good a beam spread. the wide focus is huge with a perfectly even spread and lights up everything in my view. it's beautiful.

    battery life on max is short but unless I am riding a bike at night, I almost never use that. with judicious use of the dimmer switch, I've gotten several weekends out of 1 set of batteries...
     
  34. Waynemanning84

    Waynemanning84 Tracker

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    Why two stoves. I mean it's not much weight but when I did ultralight we got our packs down one ounce at a time. And that's the best way to go about it in my opinion. Ounce by ounce gram by gram.
    I still worry about weight but not like I used to got a more comfy pack and I take more comforts..
     
  35. RedTail-HWK

    RedTail-HWK Tracker

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    Great suggestions in this thread. I'd second many of them. Another way to look at it, too, is what can you do to physically prepare yourself so your body feels less burdened, even with a few extra ounces. Practice hikes and working out ahead of time can be just as beneficial dropping gear.
     
  36. WhisperInThePine

    WhisperInThePine Wubba lubba dub dub Supporter

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    Consider a handfishing line instead of a whole rod/reel/tackle box. Handline fishing should return a few results in a forum search. 3 lures tops should suffice.

    Is this a backpacking trip or a photography shoot? You can shave weight by using your phone's camera or smaller/lighter camera.

    Lots of redundant bear protection. If you have a run in with smokey bear, use what you have and call the trip.
    I'd suggest a bear bag that will seal in odors and you can hang away from camp; will reduce your encounter with yogi and booboo.

    Consider a lighter pocket knife than the leatherman. My favorite SAK is the recruit. Two blades, bottle opener/screwdriver, can opener, tweezers and toothpick. $16, quality stainless steel, high visibility red handle, and 1.7 ounces.

    No need for a plate or mug. If you absolutely need something to eat or drink out of separately, try a collapsible silicone bowl. Usually about $7, and found at pet shops. Just need one. Leave the cutting board behind.

    2 stoves aren't necessary. Up to you to decide, but I'd go with the lighter option.

    Ditch the GPS, get a map to use with your compass. It's lighter and you can pack fewer batteries.
     
  37. matjbrown

    matjbrown Supporter Supporter

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    This has already been said, (+1 on Rubicon Dave's post) but you have a lot of redundancy. If you can eliminate duplicate items or single use items you will lighten up. If you can afford new gear, but lighter big ticket items, if not, just take less stuff. If you aren't comfortable leaving this stuff at home take it. When you get back look at what you didn't use and thinking about leaving it next time. It took me several trips and several conversation with my backpacking buddy to get him leave the "just in case" stuff. Have fun out there!
     
  38. sweeper54

    sweeper54 Scout

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    I fought with all the 'Cut, Cut, Cut' problems with hiking, my solution was to take up canoeing. Let the canoe carry the load and live well in the wilderness.

    It's all about getting into the woods.
     
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  39. thereandbackagain

    thereandbackagain Scout

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    Redundancy is an issue, but when you 'back up a battleship' with a patrol boat it becomes nonsensical. Space blankets are not sleeping systems and if any item's weight should match the need it's a proper bag. The bowsaw? Ditch it but bring a spare blade in it's protective container. You can easily fabricate the bow from some green wood. Unless you drink water from a stream and THEN notice the corpse of a moose in advanced decay ten feet upstream any critter that survives boiling and chemical likely
    wont make you ill until back home from shorter trips and close to medical care.
    Thinking 'outside the box/pack' what is on your feet? How does that old adage go? ' one pound on your foot equals five or something on your back?' A review of HOW you pack, pack FIT and harness and belt can make a difference.
     
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  40. Park Swan

    Park Swan Maker Vendor

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    #1 priority: the pack itself is absurdly heavy. I see that it's listed as a "tactical" bag on their website, not sure what exactly that entails but it's way overbuilt for a 3 day excursion. You can save 5 lbs here, especially factoring in that you won't need as large a pack after slimming down on other stuff.

    650g of food is fine as a choice, but easy to slim down on with dehydrated foods. Both carbs and proteins can be dehydrated, fats need to be carried in, but it's no biggie because they're so calorically dense.
    Example of a hearty, caloric breakfast that weighs almost nothing and can be put together for very cheap: instant oatmeal, dehydrated apples, cinnamon, powdered milk, chunk of butter.
    Savory meals can include instant potatoes, dehydrated onions and garlic, etc. Jerky is great. I like my planned meals at camp to be very efficient (read: lightweight) so that I have the ability to be less strict with some other food items, like protein bars for a snack at any time without having to dig through my pack. This highlights the main concept in my mind about shaving pack weight for backpacking: Get rid of weight wherever you can, so that you can add weight wherever you want. Plate, cutting board, extra stove are all unnecessary. If you want them, that's your choice. I prefer to make meals in my cooking pot that I can eat out of my cup or the pot itself. Those are my only two dishes. I know the mors pots are very popular among bushcrafters, and for good reason, but I personally would use that for trips where you aren't covering much ground. The 1.8L is also quite large for the needs of one person IMO.

    A little bit of fitness with the pack will go a long way to make the hike easier. You don't train for a marathon by running marathon distances. Just a few miles of carrying your fully loaded pack a few times will help tremendously in preparing mentally and physically for the demands of the trail. There's nothing like the shock of that pack weight when you put it on for the first time at the trailhead, and think "are they supposed to be this heavy?"

    FAK's can be trimmed to essentials. Imagine the scenarios which are likely to occur and pack accordingly. I have a couple of butterfly bandaids. I ditched the rest, how many bandaids will you need on one outing? I have a few ibuprofen ONLY for emergencies. I added a quikclot sponge. It's not the little things I'm worried about in the backcountry, it's the serious things.

    The sleep system seems pretty convoluted to me, so I don't know what to say about it specifically other than that it should probably be reevaluated. The weather seems pretty warm for all the stuff you have. I have a hard time imagining needing a sleeping bag, pad, bivvy, tarp, and emergency blanket for warmish weather. The clothing you pack can be an important part of the sleep system and thereby serve multiple functions. An ultralight base layer is much smaller and lighter than a heavy sleeping bag.

    I'm just rambling but I've got to stop somewhere. :) good luck!
     
  41. NeanderTall

    NeanderTall Tracker

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    Tie a LOT of balloons on your pack. Now you'll never get lost!

    That being said, I can't touch on some of the redundancy comments above without becoming ironically redundant. Feel free to toy around with different loads of gear. A new pack will really help you too.
     
  42. ra2bach

    ra2bach Guide

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    holy necro-post batman! we're giving advice to someone from almost 2.5years ago...
     
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  43. NeanderTall

    NeanderTall Tracker

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    Haha, that hadn't even occurred to me. I think he would have figured it out by now!
     
  44. Park Swan

    Park Swan Maker Vendor

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    Good catch..

    Looked at the OP's most recent post, he already bought a lighter backpack!

    [​IMG]
     

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