Here comes hurricane Micheal

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Keithturkjr, Oct 9, 2018.

  1. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2017
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    523
    Location:
    Alabama
    What are you doing if you're in the path?

    At the shop:

    Cleaning the grounds
    Picking up loose items that can be blow away
    Securing trash receptacles
    Topped off the fuel
    Assigned work tasks that set things up so that my helper will have as much work as possible that can be done without electricity. (2-3 days worth)

    At home:

    Took the garbage out right before the garbage men came :)))) #winning
    Finished all our laundry
    Ran the dishwasher
    Washed the bathtub, so I have a clean bathtub to fill up when the hurricane starts
     
    Huey, Winterhorse and woodsmanjohn like this.
  2. Silvuhboolit

    Silvuhboolit Florida Feller Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    1
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2014
    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    On a dark desert highway, cool whip in my hair...
    Michael
     
    LostViking and Winterhorse like this.
  3. Silvuhboolit

    Silvuhboolit Florida Feller Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    1
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2014
    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    On a dark desert highway, cool whip in my hair...
    Sounds like you got the bases covered. If you think you’re going to lose power, fill up water containers. I never understood why people have to go buy bottled water just because a hurricane is coming.

    Fuel is always good to have extra of, of course lots of good food, good books and a way to provide light during the evening if you don’t have a generator.

    Excuse the above correction, but my name is Michael and it’s amazing how many people miss spell it.
     
    Glock Holiday and Winterhorse like this.
  4. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2017
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    523
    Location:
    Alabama
    LOL sorry about the spelling.
    I'm pretty sure the power is gonna go down, maybe 18 hours maybe 3-6 days.

    I never understood why people buy bottled water either. They could have gotten soda or beer,....if you look at the amount of water they get it would probably fill my bathtub 1/4 full,...if they're really buying a lot.
    Work gloves that is a good pre-hurricane purchase
     
    Winterhorse likes this.
  5. Top Gibson

    Top Gibson Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2018
    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    1,446
    Location:
    Alabama
    we got everything nailed down and put up.
     
    jasam and Winterhorse like this.
  6. jasam

    jasam Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    704
    Likes Received:
    3,381
    Location:
    Brantley County Georgia
    Stay safe ol Top. I got family in Eufaula, we’ll be praying for y’all.
     
  7. Silvuhboolit

    Silvuhboolit Florida Feller Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    1
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2014
    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    On a dark desert highway, cool whip in my hair...
    I do landscaping, so after the bad storms I’m busy for a good couple of weeks just cutting up stuff. So I make sure I have plenty of fuel for the chainsaws, at least two extra chains a per saw. Gloves, clean clothes. If you have a small generator you can always wash clothes, but those generators don’t power a dryer and you can hang the clothes line for that .

    I have the Honda eu2000 generator and they are worth their weight in gold. When you can’t get fuel, and people are burning 10 to 15 gallons or more of fuel a day, you’re only burning 1 gallon.

    Hang in there and stay safe
     
  8. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2017
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    523
    Location:
    Alabama
    Looks like the eye will pass 50 miles east of me. So I ought to be alright. But check this out:

    Hurricane Local Statement
    Mobile - Pensacola
    Extremely Dangerous Hurricane Michael will make landfall this afternoon in the Florida Panhandle ... This makes Michael an extremely dangerous Category 4 hurricane ...
    Ways to prepare and stay safe now
    Close storm shutters if possible and stay away from windows. Flying glass from broken windows could injure you.
    this came from the national weather service.

    Who actually even has real storm shutters anymore? You know the doors that close over your windows. most people that have anything that even looks like them its a non-functioning decoration.
    As a guy with a construction background this sort of stuff bugs me.
     
  9. Usingmyrights

    Usingmyrights Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2013
    Messages:
    6,915
    Likes Received:
    12,201
    I think this storm took people a little bit by surprise. Not that they didn't know it was there, but originally it was just projected to get up to a Cat 1 and drop back down to a tropical storm before it hit. Now they're saying it'll be a Category 4 when it makes land fall. Definitely a huge difference. I was actually looking forward to it skirting the gulf coast as a storm. I was hoping that it would help flush out some of the red tide there without the damage. I hope that our friends in the panhandle stay safe. I'm east of I-75 and we're already seeing an increase in winds, even being that far away. It just goes to show that if you live in hurricane country to always have some supplies ready and to monitor the tropics to avoid being taken too off guard (assuming accurate predictions).
     
    blind & lost, Keithturkjr and Gumbi like this.
  10. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2017
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    523
    Location:
    Alabama
    Yeah the weather service could have been better.
    They were pretty late in predicting the path of the eye of the hurricane.

    They were a bit late gauging the intensity.
    There were areas that over and under prepared for it.
    This was a big deal for me because I wasn't hit very hard and "over prepared" I spent a lot of work getting ready for things that didn't happen. My area got hit with tropical storm force,....which is a lot like a strong alabama thunderstorm that doesnt stop in 10 minutes.

    Those poor souls in Florida got issued their evacuation orders with a very small reaction window though. Hurricane Micheal rocked that place and dropped it. I hear Mexico beach town east of PCB is pretty much gone.
     
  11. Usingmyrights

    Usingmyrights Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2013
    Messages:
    6,915
    Likes Received:
    12,201
    The one positive about evacuating the panhandle is there's multiple options on where to go. Peninsula FL pretty much has 75 or 95 as their main routes out and unless it hits the bend, can only flee north. The problem is, a shifting track can change all that. With Irma last year some friends fled from immediately south of Tampa Bay when it was supposed to make landfall there. They spent hours on the interstate to go to another facility in the Live Oak area only to have the storm shift and hit that area worse. It wasn't even predicted to be in the Gulf at first, but the skim the Atlantic coast.
     
    blind & lost and MommaJ like this.
  12. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2017
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    523
    Location:
    Alabama
    So you're from Florida?

    Hope everything's alright on your end.

    Looking at the aftermath I think Florida should consider revisiting their building codes.
    As I'd mentioned earlier I have a construction background. I think they could adjust them to better withstand storms like this without disproportionately affecting the price of housing.

    -Climate change may be a political debate, but is also a reality and more intense storms are here to stay so more storm resistant carpentry would not go to waste.
    - The materials portion of building a home is usually about 25-30% of the total cost of a house,...The parts they could change to make a house stronger against high winds like those would account for maybe a 5-8% price increase in the materials part of that budget. Most of the labor processes wouldn't change much so that part of the price wouldn't change much.
    If you look at places with very expensive housing like beach house in southern California and Staten island, most of the price is accrued though factors that aren't directing associated with the construction of the structure. NYC they have to carry everything way up in the sky to build it. California has expensive high demand land parcels and the heavy regulations on construction are often directed at the labor side of construction in addition to the earthquake codes.

    Code changes that could help:
    -Using thicker framing members like 2"x6" for all exterior walls
    I think they are already doing some of these things in Florida construction like the 2"x6" exterior framing, but I don't know if its in their codes. I do know it wasn't always in the codes.

    Using metal joining hardware and screws or stronger screws to attach framing members to floor plates on all exterior walls
    I know that there is heavy use of metal fasteners in structural framing in Florida and that these materials and installation labor are already part of their construction costs.
    Using a little more hardware, or redesigning the metal hardware, or re specifying the fasteners used to attach the hardware could increase their strength that the sticks are held together with by up to 300%

    Stronger wind strapping supports. All structure blueprints designed by architects have wind ratings. increasing strapping supports can dramatically increase the wind ratings to pretty much whatever you want them to be. This is probably the biggest factor.
    It's also the cheapest :))) Many of the structures in Florida have a strip of diagonal sheet metal strip running along the corners of the frame. Increasing the stringency of the building codes on this particular part of new construction would increase the wind rating of new structures by up to an additional 30 MPH.

    Finally using different kinds of nails on shingles and screws in metal roofing could increase there resistance to coming off.
    Asphalt shingles really have there limits to durability,...but the sky is the limit with how tough metal roofing can become.
    Metal roofs can be made very tough. Using slightly thicker sheets like going from 29 gauge to 24 gauge or so can make a sheet much more resistant to bending and tearing away from screws.
    using screws with a different kind of backer behind them and a stronger purlin (the piece the metal sheet is screwed to) can make the strength of a metal roof weather resistance go up dramtically.
     
  13. Usingmyrights

    Usingmyrights Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2013
    Messages:
    6,915
    Likes Received:
    12,201
    @Keithturkjr My area was fine. We got some spin off tornados, but I haven't seen any reports of bad damage. I had a few small limbs come down, but it wouldn't have taken much for them to fall. As far as building codes, a lot of them were updated after Andrew in '92 and changes don't happen overnight. It may seem like a long time ago, but some of those houses have been there for decades. I'm sure they'll be looked into again after this. The thing is, most storms aren't this strong. If the storm his has even a category 3, the destruction wouldn't be nearly as bad. With upper Category 4/Cat 5 storms, massive destruction is unfortunately the norm. I forgot what storm that was, because it was some years back, but it wasn't an overly impressive storm. It made landfall and things were holding together well and then it stopped. The hurricane basically idled, without really weakening. The duration of the storm is what caused the damage. Storms can be unpredictable and unfortunately the worst are hard to prepare for.
     
    blind & lost likes this.
  14. Keithturkjr

    Keithturkjr Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2017
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    523
    Location:
    Alabama
    Yeah building code changes do not change existing structures. Existing structures are regularly 90-95% of stuctures in any given area. It takes 60 years for new codes to become the baseline standard.

    Code changes I'm talking about are targeted the premise that we will be seeing more cat 4 and cat 5 storms in the future. More intense storms are in store for the future.

    Climate change is real. There are people that say its because of humans and that we should all hug a tree for being our friend, and there are people that say those people are crazy. But that is all besides the point.

    Most detailed weather records are less than 150 years old, which is a very short period of time when trying to predict weather in terms of climate change. Their are geological records that have set precedent for huge climate variations and if looking closely there are even historical accounts. Geologically there are even proven accounts of relatively large atmospheric gas ratio fluctuations.
    5e5de4cb5e60e528146cfbe4982bc2b5.jpg
    Giant crustaceans will pop up if the CO2 levels in the atmosphere get high enough.
    Yikes!
    But it takes a very long time for things like that to occur.

    When the climate change makes its swing regardless of when or why, intense weather patterns happen in its execution. Storms getting bigger is just a small part of whats going to be real.
    I think we will see 2-3 category 5 hurricanes go through the gulf of Mexico before we die.
     

Share This Page