Hiking Photography

Discussion in 'Backpacking' started by BullseyePrecision, Feb 25, 2018.

  1. BullseyePrecision

    BullseyePrecision Scout

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    • I have been getting into hiking photography lately and I would like to see what gear everyone uses. I am not talking about little 1 to 2 hour hikes but either all day hikes or overnight hikes.

      I have been looking at backpacks to get a specific bag for hiking photography other than my regular photography bag. Been looking at the Mindshift Gear Rotation 180 pro. I like the rotation feature and think it would come in handy during hiking trips.

      What do you guys have? Are you into hiking photography?
     
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  2. mjfruth

    mjfruth Tracker

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    Subscribing to this one.....the shear number of bags I've gone through looking for the "right one" is mind boggling.....:)
     
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  3. TheRambler

    TheRambler Scout

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    What will a specific bag do for you besides better storage? Or is that the reason? I just use a trekking pole with a camera screw mount under the handle and a dslr. Every now and then i will bring a small tripod, but i will usually just fashion a tripod to support the trek pole if needed. Trekking pole is from ems and the cork handle unscrews and that screw is the standard camera thread. Stick pole tip in ground and it works like a champ
     
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  4. BullseyePrecision

    BullseyePrecision Scout

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    Well I like hiking and photography and would like a photography pack that is designed specifically for that. There are just certain things photography packs do that traditionally backpacks don't account for. Like protection of gear, gear accessibility, dividing of gear. Along with the ability to carry the other things I need for that specific day or overnight hike. I have a good photography bag but that's all it is for. There are no compartments to separate other gear from the photo gear. And long hikes where not taken in to consideration for it.
     
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  5. BullseyePrecision

    BullseyePrecision Scout

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    I am looking at the Mindshift Gear Rotation 180 Pro, The F-stop Tilopa and Sukha, and the Shimoda 60L.
     
  6. mjfruth

    mjfruth Tracker

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    There's a couple in there I'm going to need to check out......thanks! I'm also considering the Lowepro Whistler BP 350 AW. I like the "backside" opening for the camera gear and the separate compartment for personal/camping stuff.
     
  7. Pastor Chris

    Pastor Chris Keeper of the T.Darrah Tenkara Pass-Around Hobbyist Supporter Bushcraft Friend Hardwoodsman Bushclass II

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    I suppose it come down to what you feel the need to carry on the photography end.

    I'm all for more nice bags, but lately, I've trimmed down the amount of gear I carry so that I can add it into my hiking kit versus trying to find a camera pack that will fit my bushcraft kit, if that makes sense.
     
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  8. Lars

    Lars Angry German Supporter

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    I just take an Osprey backpack (36L long day/70L overnight) and attach a small DSLR bag to the waist belt for easy access. All extra lenses, tripod, etc get stored inside the Osprey.
     
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  9. mjfruth

    mjfruth Tracker

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    I think that's my biggest problem.....I want to have too much with me "just in case". I wish I could find someone with a Sigma TC-1401 teleconverter.....I want to try (before I buy) that with my Sigma 15-250. I'm thinking I could cover most everything I need with those and my 35mm prime.
     
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  10. Flash

    Flash Tracker

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    I use to try and cover the full range from wide to tel with a bag full of lens. Other then when I'm out shooting something like birds where I really need a big tel lens I have found that for the most part less is more. one prime and a small mid range zoom work well for me, sometimes even just two primes. It makes you little more creative with framing a shot but have had very few trips where I really felt I missed out. I good guide is to look at all your photos you take when you are out hiking and use a program that sorts counts by focal length. You will see what you really use most of the time. It's surprising on a zoom lens to see that often it's really being used at both extremes most of the time over the full range.
     
  11. dirt7

    dirt7 Supporter Supporter

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    I have a Nikon D700, and usually carry that with a 24-70 and a 90mm Macro when I am going on dedicated "photo" trips. For me the best option so far has been a small padded case for the camera, and padded cases for each lens. I stuff these inside of my normal daypack so I have room for other essentials. I haven't looked around for a dedicated "camera hiking bag" but this setup really works for me.
     
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  12. Gerald_G

    Gerald_G Scout Bushclass I

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    I've been looking into the same purchase. I want to take some gear on multi day trips.

    I did read this article, which has me thinking....

    https://petapixel.com/2017/03/30/camera-specific-outdoor-packs-suck-heres-use-instead/

    The author uses a Tenba BYOB inside a regular backpack, and believes that true backpacks provide better support, and hiking comfort that a camera specific backpack. Tenba offers 4 sizes of inserts.

    Personally I think I'm going to look into a solution that straps onto my NorthFace pack, or fits inside nearest to an opening for as simple access as possible.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2018
  13. Gerald_G

    Gerald_G Scout Bushclass I

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    I'd be interested in know which packs you've tried, and what you did not like about each one.
     
  14. petey091

    petey091 Scout

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    I have just got back to photography and have picked up a Sony A6000. I am a lightweight backpacker so I have to relized that I can't carry everything I want into the backcountry. My plan is to get a clip system the mounts onto my pack strap and will hold my camera. I am taking my 16-55 mm lens and a X2 extender and a macro tube. a couple extra batteries and a battery pack and thats it.
     
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  15. mjfruth

    mjfruth Tracker

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    Hmmmm....I'm not sure I could recall them all.... I know I tried a lot of the bigger names like Lowepro, Caselogic, etc. I found something about each of them which bothered me....but almost every time it was not the "camera" part. Either the shoulder straps didn't work for me, or the chest strap was in the wrong place, or the waist belt was too high.....

    The more I think about some of the others suggestions, the more I'm liking the idea of using one of my regular packs and putting the gear in some padded equipment cubes. I know I have some around here somewhere.....lol.
     
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  16. BullseyePrecision

    BullseyePrecision Scout

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    That is the same problem I have had with my bags being 6' 5" and my torso length is just a little over 19". I found that the average torso size on bags is around 18.5" and boy does that come into play. I can definitely tell the difference from a bag that fits my torso to one that doesn't.

    The best bag I have had in terms of how it felt was the lowepro fastpack 250. The only downfall I have with this pack is the size. It is just too small of a pack when I need to take a lot of gear or go on long hikes. It is great for short day trips and when I need less gear. I have the Lowepro Protactic 450 and figured the straps and how it feels would be the same but they are not even close. The protactic is a great bag it is just not very comfortable. It is going to be my bag when I will only be wearing it for short periods or flying somewhere. I just ordered the Shimoda Design 60L backpack to be my hiking pack. The thing this one has that others are lacking is the ability to adjust the straps to multiple different torso sizes. Hopefully this will end my bag search and will not have to sell it and find something else... again.
     
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  17. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Guide

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    I have a friend who has a camera specific day pack. Unfortunately from what he's told me the company just went defunct. It works well for him. His setup is a Canon 6D II with a Canon 40mm pancake lens generally speaking. Or a wide angle zoom if he opts for the additional weight. He uses the Ultrapod II which works with the 40mm but the ball can't support his other glass.

    Edit: I went and found the link to the company he got his pack from, click here. Not sure if there are still some available, heck perhaps even for a discount. Otherwise it might be worth contacting them to ask about alternatives.

    This is my setup. Canon SL1 crop sensor DSLR. Ultrapod tripod which supports my camera with my Canon 28mm pancake lens in landscape, but not portrait mode on it's own. I tend to leave my other lens at home and take the 28mm pancake, ultrapod, remote, and now a polarizing filter. I stash the body and lens in a padded roll top waterproof bag and keep it at the top of my pack. It's a bit less convenient than my friends pack, but cheap and simple and insurance against rain and falling in the creek. I've been through at least on rainstorm on a hike with it safe and sound in my pack.


    [​IMG]Camera Setup, Nothing Fancy by MJGEGB, on Flickr

    Results

    [​IMG]Falls Wide by MJGEGB, on Flickr
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
  18. charlesmc2

    charlesmc2 Scout

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    As much as I love photography backpacking generally wins out, so light weight gets priority. Plus I don't like putting my expensive equipment too much at risk. So I generally opt for more of a high end point and shoot. Something like (nowadays) the Nikon P900.

    Also, one advantage of the general backpacking bags--they don't scream "steal me, I'm packed with expensive photographic goodies." I've been generally pleased with the Amazon Basics stuff. Plain generic looking.
     
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  19. mbiraman

    mbiraman Guide Bushclass II

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    So i have a sony a6000. I generally use a ula circuit backpack and i use "lowepro slingbag " as a camera bag, like it very much.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2018
  20. Back Off

    Back Off Scout

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    Well, honestly my Galaxy S6 active isnt too shabby on the photography side. I do plan on getting a good camera some day but my phone is light and seems to work ok for now.

    28429167_151628785508822_4726989307456258048_n.jpg Cell 1913.jpg Cell 1912.jpg Cell 1908.jpg
     
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  21. snapper

    snapper Guide

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    Years ago I carried a really nice Cannon SLR with at least four different lens so I could meet all conditions and situations. I carried it, and the various lens, in a special bag made by Lowe. I also had a totally waterproof dry bag made for cameras whenever I took it out on the water. After a while I realized I spent too much time behind the camera and not enough time enjoying the trip.

    When that light bulb went off I brought it all down to a simple Cannon DSLR that I can adjust the settings on or keep in a "Point & Shoot" auto mode. Honestly, maybe it's because I'm not a professional but I don't see a marked difference in my photos. I think most of it is in the composition of your shot. If you can get that right, the rest will fall into place. Also, like with many new "toys" (i.e. phones, cameras, watches,etc.), they're infinitely better than what came before them so the results will be better.

    As for my current camera bag? It's an old side pocket from one of my packs. I place the camera in it's own zip-loc baggie and the batteries go in another one. I've been using this simple set up for a couple of years now in both rain & shine and on land & sea. It works for me so that's what I'll continue with until my experiences say to change it all.

    Of course, like with everything else in life, YMMV. Whatever you choose...just get out there and enjoy using it.

    That's all for now. Take care and until next time....be well.

    snapper
     
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  22. Fueco

    Fueco Tracker

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    I haven't done much backpacking since the switch to digital cameras, but I always preferred point & shoots for backpacking. But then, I was also an ultralight purist. I had my camera system down below a pound at one point (Ricoh R1, mini tripod, film, batteries, waterproof stow sack). If I was to go now, I would carry my Canon 80D along with at least the 24-105 and 35mm macro lenses, spare SD cards, spare batteries. I'd probably just have those in a padded gear bag (Mountainsmith made one that was pretty cool) inside my backpack. Tripod would go on the outside of the pack.
     
  23. Scoman

    Scoman Tracker

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    I use my regular rucksack with a padded camera insert. The Kifaru Xing or Xray I use have a front opening panel as well as a top loading function. To waterproof it I have a dry bag around the insert and close it when the rain starts. Note 'when the rain starts', I live in Scotland it's gonna happen.
     
  24. Black Feather

    Black Feather Hunter Gatherer Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I do a lot of hiking and wildlife photography. I am currently shooting with a Panasonic G85, 100-300 II lens, and a 12-35 lens. All of that fits in a small water resistant bag that I stick in my bushcraft pack. However, the single best investment (in my opinion) for someone who does a lot of hiking and photography is to purchase a Peak Design Capture Pro. It is a multipurpose unit that allows you to attach your camera to your backpack, belt strap, haversack, etc. and removes with the click of a button. It is also able to be coupled with a tripod. I highly recommend one of these! When worn on your chest with your pack strap you do not feel the weight one bit. It's sleek, easily removable, and you hardly miss a shot with wildlife. Check them out: https://www.peakdesign.com/product/clips

     

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