How to remove a spoon from a piece of wood...

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by Rumblebuffin, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. Rumblebuffin

    Rumblebuffin Tracker

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    So I split a bit off of an ash log in my backyard... and I want to try my hand at making a spoon. Could anyone kindly point me towards a solid tutorial or some instructions to get me started?

    Thanks!
     
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  2. Broke

    Broke Back yard bushcrafter Supporter

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    Check out the self made gear forum. First post, sticky, should give you some solid examples.
    Adam G
     
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  3. Finner

    Finner Supporter Supporter

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    I'm new to spoon carving but have found Ben Orford and Robin Wood to be very helpful.
     
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  4. Rumblebuffin

    Rumblebuffin Tracker

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    I can't stand it... If Robin Wood is whittling, is that Wood working or woodworking?

    Solid suggestions! Thank you!
     
  5. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

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    Carving is easy, just remove everything that is not a spoon, and voila, your left with a spoon. I say that half joking, but it is really true. After carving a few hundred I have gotten to the point where I just visualize what I want to carve and start removing wood until I am left with a spoon. I never plan ahead or draw anything out. I just let the wood tell me what it wants to be and go with it. I guess my point is to get your axe, knife, and hook out and go to it. The wood will help guide it. Also you might check out any of the works by Wille Sundqvist or his son Jogge.
     
  6. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

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    BTW, no has mentioned it so I will. Ash is really not suitable for spoons. Not saying it wont work as a spoon, but it is a ring porous wood like oak, and has large pores almost like tiny straws. You can actually blow through a fairly long piece of wood through these pores. You might be wondering why this is bad. One main reason is that these pores will get clogged with food and hold bacteria. They will also not be smooth when eating with them.

    Your best choice is a fruit woods. My personal favorite spoon woods are Apple wood and Rhododendron. My most used wood though is Paper Birch. It makes great spoons, pole turned bowls, and large carved dough bowls. I have also use pear, cherry, plumb, maple, and others.
     
  7. Rumblebuffin

    Rumblebuffin Tracker

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    Well, then... Lol.
    Ash also has a low level of toxicity... I know it's not the best, but it's literally all I have available to me at the moment. Maybe I'll pick another project for the moment? I'll figure it out. :p
     
  8. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

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    Green wood is best, but I have plenty of somewhat dry Birch that I splint last month if you wanted. I could split of some spoon sized pieces and mail them to you if you want to pay shipping. Could send you some fairly green small rounds as well you could split in half and carve.
     
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  9. tcshooter

    tcshooter Supporter Supporter

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    ok then...wood choices I did not know about - thanx for that info from me!!

    I probably cut down 100 or more Bradford Pear trees every summer. Also at least a half dozen paper bark river birch.

    I have a couple logs with some great looking red in it from a boxelder I took out last fall. Going to see if a local guy can turn me a couple bowls or something this year. I might use some from the limb wood with the red streaks for a couple sets of knife grips.

    I got some nice limb wood from a nearly dead walnut we cut down Friday. I am trying to stock up on raw wood to see what I can do with it in my spare time.
     
  10. Makarov

    Makarov Scout

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    for hand tool wood working, I like Paul Sellers videos on youtube. he has a couple on basic spoon making, one where he starts with firewood and goes from there.
     
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  11. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

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    Sounds like you have a good supply of wood at hand. The pear is nice to carve and has a nice blond to tan color when finished with walnut oil. Smells good when carving it green too. If you are going to try carving a spoon do it with green wood. Not only will it carve easier, but the surface finish will be better without sanding. I do not sand as it raises grain, while just knife cut wood will be very smooth.
     
  12. forgeblast

    forgeblast Scout

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    Barn the spoon will be putting a book out in may, but his you tube videos have helped me a lot. Swedish carving techniques is a great book, so is the dvd by jarrod stone dahl carving wooden spoons.
     
  13. hamanky

    hamanky Scout Vendor Hobbyist Supporter

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    I'll second Paul Sellers videos, you can learn alot from him. Be warned though hand tool woodworking can suck you into the rabbit hole! Lol
     
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  14. curtiseddie

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    Would sycamore be a viable wood choice?
     
  15. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

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    Sycamore works fine. I have carved only a few spoons with it and turned one bowl on the pole lathe with it. It is more prone to splitting though so you have to be more careful. I only have the one spoon left from the sycamore, the other spoons and bowl have long since been sold or given away, I don't remember which.
     
  16. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

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    BTW, Paul Sellars is a great traditional woodworker, but not really a green woodworker. There are better resources then him for green woodworking. He tries carving like a western woodworker not a green wood carver. Not saying this is bad, just not efficient or traditional. Traditional spoon carving revolves around axe, knife, and hook/crooked knife. Paul tries it with saw, mallet, chisel, spokeshave, and all other tools not really suited for spoon carving.

    Get a copy of Wille Sundqvist "Swedish Carving Techniques". One of the best resources you can have on traditional spoon carving.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2017
  17. jasam

    jasam Tracker

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    How would woods like wax myrtle and chokecherry work for spoons?
     
  18. Chili

    Chili Supporter Supporter

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    Would Wood woodworking work?

    (Look at all them dubyas!) :p
     
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  19. CowboyJesus

    CowboyJesus Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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