HPG Tararhumara or Another Pack?

Discussion in 'Packs, Bags & Pouches' started by MississipVol, Apr 14, 2018.

  1. MississipVol

    MississipVol Supporter Supporter

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    I have been trouble finding a right lightweight pack to use for day hikes. I had a LL Bean Continental Ruck but that was just too big, bulky, and heavy. I have tried using a sling bag like the Maxpedition Versipack but it tends to dig into my neck while hiking with my body shape. I really love the Hidden Woodsmen Haversack but figure it would do the same.

    So I have been eyeing the Hill People Tararhumara and it looks to be a good size. Anyone use one of those and, fi so, what are your thoughts? Would you call it a lighter weight comfortable pack? (I use a lot of lightweight gear and try to pack light)

    Any other options out there I need to take a serious look at? Trying to stay under $150. Thanks!!
     
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  2. ezra45

    ezra45 Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I had a Tara but decided it was too small so I sol it and got the Umlindi ...perfect! Carries my cook kit,water,jacket, cap,FAC,food,tarp,and EDC stuff. Very comfortable and you can add a Tara Pocket if you want more room. You can even tie on a lightweight sleeping bag or quilt.

    Regards,

    ezra
     
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  3. Gruxxx

    Gruxxx Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Also check out the ULA Photon.
     
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  4. NJStricker

    NJStricker Supporter Supporter

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    The Tara has an excellent suspension and is a comfortable pack to carry. It is small. If you are the type to pack for every contingency or packing to support kids with you you will find it lacking. If you are packing for a light day outing for yourself it is perfect.

    Another setup you might consider is a Mountainsmith Day with strappettes.
     
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  5. Usingmyrights

    Usingmyrights Supporter Supporter

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    I have one and like it. Just wish the bottle pockets were designd so that they didn't take up so much interior space on the pack. It carries quite well though. I've got a few different day packs and it'll definitely stay near the top of the rotation.
     
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  6. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    I had one- it carried very nice with it's yoke style shoulder straps. It's definitely on the smaller side, but was able to stretch it into a UL overnighter, obviously not designed for that. It's a very durable pack that could easily outlast it's owner. The side pockets are less than perfect for water carry; I did find that 1/2 liter Platypus bottles did OK in it (they are pretty flat).

    Someone recently had a Mystery Ranch Urban Assault pack for sale. I picked one up recently. It's very bare bones, but very well built and also carries nicely. Another pack if you kept it, you could easily pass onto your kids (or grandkids). It's worth taking a peek at.
     
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  7. reppans

    reppans Scout

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    Take a look at the Deuter ACT Trail 24 - it's not an UL pack, more of full featured small hiking pack. I have mine cinched down to ~14 L/lbs as my EDC/GHB/hiking/light overnight pack. I like the stashable, yet proper weight-bearing hip belt; contoured frame sheet; ventilated back panels; zip panel access directly to bottom, and it's tall profile (w/ narrow width and shallow depth) for stacking my load high and tight to my spine.
     
  8. plantedtao

    plantedtao Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Love my Tara. It's my go to for a day pack. I can pack it pretty well but my gear is on the light weight side of things. It makes you really consider what to carry and you have to fit some gear on the outside.
    I put two smart water bottles (long and skinny) on the outside pockets and they fit... Those pockets are the on draw back.
    I had about 15lbs of gear in it last trip and I really liked how it carried. Very comfortable pack.
     
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  9. mjh

    mjh Supporter Supporter

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    I'm with ezra, too small of volume for me. I up sized to an Umlindi. Quality was as good as any other HPG gear. Comfortable also.
     
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  10. MississipVol

    MississipVol Supporter Supporter

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    Will it fit the klean kanteen with a nested cup in the water bottle pockets?
     
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  11. NJStricker

    NJStricker Supporter Supporter

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    No. Your options are the Smart Water bottles like noted above, or a GI style canteen like the one made by Nalgene. The canteens will not fit with the GI steel cup. Canteens and larger water bottles use up some of the interior pack space.
     
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  12. NJStricker

    NJStricker Supporter Supporter

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  13. aaronu

    aaronu Armchair Bushcrafter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Biggest i would go with a tarahumara is Klean Kanteen 27 oz bottles.

    The suspension is super comfortable. Best i have used.

    Tarahumara by itself is a minimal daypack. Andy at 5col used to carry cargo hangers, small duffel that attached via some added straps. I think the company (Dunamis) isn't around anymore, which is too bad. Attaching a small cargo hanger on the top of the pack made it more capable of light overnight gear. Put the small stuff in the top cargo hanger, gear in the pack and lash a small sleep system to the straps. One could attach a HPG stuff sack or medium cargo hanger to the back or hang it off the bottom of the pack.

    Of course one can set up a tarahumara with a kit bag, that adds capacity and puts things in easy reach.

    So if you want small daypack, tarahumara will do it. If there is any chance of an overnight, get something larger. Great small packs though. I gave my Ranger Green one to my son and regret it. I still have a black one but I am tempted to grab another Ranger Green if Andy gets them in stock.

    I will say, though, that it is easier to cinch down a larger pack than to over stuff a small pack. If your budget can handle it, look at the Umlindi or the Connor.
     
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  14. VanGo

    VanGo poi'-ā-mä Supporter

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    Tara for a dayhiking with preparation for overnight contingency is a great pack. Plenty of straps to lash gear down to carry outside. Umlindi for 2-3 day gear hauler has plenty of interior space for essential gear, add more days, season changes ie more clothing/gear head up to the qui Ya.

    21B7796E-AA2B-49FC-AFE5-67216FC63C6B.jpeg
     
  15. M.Hatfield

    M.Hatfield Midnight Joker Supporter

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    Another vote for Mystery Ranch as a maker of very nice backpacks. The variety of options you have in addition to HPG is quite vast.

    Honestly, as with most choices, it comes down to personal preference and experience since the quality of all these brands is not a question.
     
  16. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    Tara in bare bones overnighter mode

    [​IMG]
     
  17. wvtracker14

    wvtracker14 Hardwoodsman #9 Supporter Hardwoodsman

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    I have both the Tara and Umlindi, the Tara goes with me on most all my day hikes. It forced me to re-look at the gear I carry and ditch the non-essentials. Like everyone else my only complaint is the pockets, really don't know why HPG hasn't fixed this issue, even on the Umlindi you can barley get a Heavy Cover canteen in the pockets. But overall its a great pack its got plenty of straps on the outside to affix items and on the bottom as well.
     
  18. Red Wing

    Red Wing Guide

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    Ultimate Direction 15 is on my list. I use a 25 and it's boss. 15 looks like the perfect day pack to me and easy enough to pack a couple things in case of overnight.
     
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  19. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    the UD 15 is a solid pack, I’ve really been impressed with mine

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. aaronu

    aaronu Armchair Bushcrafter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Check out Arc'teryx. My son has a 13 liter adventure pack from them. It seems to hold about the same amount as my Tarahumara. He's had the pack all through his teens and into his early 20's, and hasn't managed to destroy it yet. A quick search will find some Arc'teryx packs currently on sale. Examples: Mantis 26 liter daypack $149, Cierzo 18 liter $99.

    Never heard of Ultimate Direction packs. If I see one in the wild I'm pretty sure that giant logo on the back would clue me in. :) In comparison to a Tarahumara, the UD 15 is a 21 liter pack. As in, 15 liters secured capacity and 6 more liters unsecured capacity. I take that to mean that it's really close in size to a Tarahumara.

    Weight-wise, a Tarahumara is 33% heavier than a UD15 (23 oz vs 17.25oz). IMO the Tarahumara was designed to be a solid piece of outdoor gear for comfortable, light dayhike/scouting use with added versatility in the form of HPG pack accessories. It wasn't designed primarily as a lightweight gear item and it doesn't look like one. It's relatively lightweight mostly because it's a small pack. If you are a runner or hardcore gram weenie (or even if you just want to look like one :59:) then perhaps the UD15 is the pack for you. On the other hand -- based on some of the example packs you suggested I think a Hill People Gear might suit you better.

    All that said, I tried a Tarahumara and loved it for dayhikes and overnighters. Then HPG did a run of black Tarahumaras, and I snapped one up specifically as an urban/travel daypack. So far it's been great. I got a Tarainsert for mine, which adds structure to the pack and lets me fasten gear or pouches into the pack to organize stuff however I wish. In fact the HPG tool roll and general purpose pocket are on my wish list. But the best thing about the pack, to me, is the yoke-style suspension that BTW the Tarahumara shares with the other HPG packs. It's easily the most comfortable small pack I've ever used. It also lets the Tarahumara carry more weight than many lightweight packs can handle (50 lbs vs ~ 20) ... not that I'd recommend loading up 50 lbs in any pack as small as these.

    Anyway that's still my recommendation. HPG Tarahumara is a great daypack.

    HPG has a pick of an attractive, petite woman wearing a Tarahumara. Well, here's the opposite. The dude in this pic is 6'1 and (if we're being kind) probably 275 lbs.

    Big Guy Small Pack_small.JPG
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2018
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  21. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    yeah the Tara and UD 15 are apples and oranges really

    they share relatively the same volume- very different materials and built for different purposes

    while not identical, they do have similar suspensions- the UD also has a yoke style (a little more vest like)- that’s very comfortable and would agree that the Tara carries very well too due to this design
     
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  22. aaronu

    aaronu Armchair Bushcrafter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Agreed. I figure if UD is making packs (and vests) for runners and adventure racers, their packs ought to be pretty darn stable.

    Not to mention I’ve read enough of your posts to know your POV comes from use. Probably hard use at that.

    So says I, from my comfy armchair.

    Just kidding... I’m in the airport, on my way home to my Tarahumara pack. And my dog. Oh yeah, wife and kids too.
     
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  23. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

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  24. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    ^ that does look pretty sweet- great price too; my buddy has one of their packs- 40-ish liters iirc, it's pretty nice

    I like that little 20 liter one they have too- reminiscent of the old GoLite Ion
     
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  25. MississipVol

    MississipVol Supporter Supporter

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    I wound up buying a Hidden Woodsmen dayruck through the BUSA forums from Prepared Wanderer for a good price. It doesn't have bottle pockets like I wanted but at least has an internal pocket for one and I lash a pouch to the outside later on if needed. I appreciate all the suggestions. I really do like the looks of the Hill People Gear packs and may pick up a Tarahumara down the road to try it out. Thanks!!
     
  26. LFowler

    LFowler Scout

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    I used a terra for awhile, I actually usually carried 40oz Klean Kanteens, and usually with a ti mug. The ti mug made one bottle easier to get in and out since it held the pocket open, otherwise you might need to take the pack off to re-insert it. On longer hikes I found myself strapping a lot of stuff to the outside, gear wasn't a problem so much as layers. If the weather is variable and you aren't using the most packable clothing you may struggle.

    I also came to the conclusion that it is easier to shrink an umlindi then to expand a Terra, my current EDC pack is almost the exact dimensions as a Umlindi and I love it. My EDC only occupies 1/3 to 1/2 of the capacity but that gives me plenty of room to rifle through it and also to add stuff I didn't plan on carrying (wife's layers, or groceries for instance).
     
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  27. leightyj2

    leightyj2 Supporter Supporter

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    The Tara is nice. I gotta say though as someone who sweats, not having any mesh on the back makes for one sweaty hike. That and the lack of side pockets big enough for heavy cover or a large hydro flask are pretty big neagatives
     
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  28. Skotelawe

    Skotelawe Guide

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    Oh my. I like that.

    Edit: I just realized who the owner of the company is. That gives me second thoughts.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2018
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  29. GoKartz

    GoKartz Sharpaholic Supporter

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    I'm a big fan of the Tara, but it is not what I consider lightweight. I think lightweight and I think of the shady middle ground between ultralight and "regular." That to me is something very specific; the Tara might be small, and I wouldn't say it is heavy, but the Tara only weighs 12oz less than the Ohm 2.0 with its almost 63L of volume (while the Tara is a measly 16L). If by lightweight pack you mean something small, durable, and not excessively heavy... totally different story.

    I don't know if I'd say the Tara is too small. I've done warm overnights in it in the past, but not anytime recent. It is going to depend on your gear. My favorite two uses for the Tara are as a running bag (first aid, water, a few tools, food, more water), or as a range bag (ammo, range finder, monocular, first aid, etc).

    These are a few photos of the last overnighter I did with just the Tara a few years ago. The bag strapped to the bar is the Hennessy Hammock, the thing strapped to the bottom is the HPG serape (insulation), and the rest of the contents are fairly self explanatory - you can see a 3L bladder hiding but not pictured. It was a max load out for the Tara, but I don't remember the weight. I'd rather have a larger bag, but I think this shows what you CAN do with it.

    IMG_0571.jpg
    IMG_0572 (1).jpg
    IMG_0569.jpg

    Moral of the story - it is a great dayhike bag, and with the right equipment you can carry quite a lot. I like to either keep it light or go bigger, but the Tara is great.
     
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