Hydration bladder vs bottle

Discussion in 'Backpacking' started by JosephDurham, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. JosephDurham

    JosephDurham Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2015
    Messages:
    2,011
    Likes Received:
    8,840
    Location:
    Bethel, Ohio
    Which do you prefer and why? Hydration bladder or bottle; or do you like to use both? Are you completely against the hydration bladder?
     
  2. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Messages:
    1,580
    Likes Received:
    5,501
    Location:
    NYC
    Bladder only if it has an effective shut off valve
    I lose 1/2 my water from leaking at the bite valve while hiking
    Compression in a bag forces most bite valves to leak
    I do like hanging a bladder at camp and having 1-2 liters for various uses
     
  3. M.Hatfield

    M.Hatfield Midnight Joker #42 Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 29, 2015
    Messages:
    3,400
    Likes Received:
    18,800
    Location:
    New England
    Bladder and bottles during the heat of summer. Bottles alone during the rest of the year.

    Having extra during high heat makes the most sense to me as I lose water fastest with high temp/humidity.

    Also depends on the length of my trip and some other factors. I trend towards only using some water bottles.
     
    JosephDurham and Bobsdock like this.
  4. Enzo

    Enzo Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2018
    Messages:
    775
    Likes Received:
    5,347
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I’ve never used a bladder. I appreciate simplicity, and bladders aren’t simple to sanitize. At least, not like bottles.
     
  5. riokid87

    riokid87 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2018
    Messages:
    681
    Likes Received:
    2,180
    I have a little bladder backpack that my wife bought. I've never used the bladder.
    I like my ss canteen, cup, and cover.
    I have a sports bottle w a filter I like. Carry it empty when fishing and just fill when I need water.
    Plastic water containers seem to be hard to clean esp if you put anything in them other than water.
    I do have a wine bota bag, leather w plastic liner. It only holds wine.
     
  6. John from Alberta

    John from Alberta Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2018
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    1,890
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    I typically always have at least a 1L Nalgene on me because when I’m backpacking I use a Steripen for water sterilization and it’s make it easy. I have always found that I stay WAY more hydrated when I use a bladder though. If I have to reach back and pull out my bottle every time I want to drink, I will drink much less. So on longer trips I try to have both.

    On the other hand, if I’m just bumming around in the woods, I don’t bother with the bladder, just a nalgene or two depending on water availability of where I’ll be.
     
  7. Bobsdock

    Bobsdock Still going Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2017
    Messages:
    3,523
    Likes Received:
    20,459
    Location:
    Shell knob mo.
    I have a small hydration pack that I use a bladder with for summer day hikes.
    And two larger packs that are hydration bladder compatable but I never use a bladder with them because you must empty the packs to refill the bladder.
    I use a 32 ounce Nalgene bottles and platypus bottles most of the time.
     
    M.Hatfield and JosephDurham like this.
  8. BradGad

    BradGad Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2012
    Messages:
    3,605
    Likes Received:
    16,310
    Location:
    NE Georgia
    Are you asking specifically in a backpacker/thru-hiker context?

    If so, something to be said for the bladder. If not... if you’re talking about time out in the woods... then I would say bottle/canteen all the way.
     
  9. ineffableone

    ineffableone Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,724
    Likes Received:
    456
    Location:
    Pac Northwest, east of the Cascades
    I had absolutely no use for hydration bladders and used SS bottles only due to being able to use them in a fire to purify water or to cook with etc...

    However when I discovered the Geigerrig "hydration engine" bladders, I found use for those bladders. At the risk of sounding like a sales person, I shall sing the praises that got me converted to using them. Just trying to lay out what made me finally go for a bladder after hating them and only singing praises for SS bottles.

    What makes the Geigerrig bladders different is they are a pressurized system. The water squirts out of them rather than needing to be sucked. This gives them a wide variety of alternate uses besides just drinking from. From sharing without sharing spit, washing off mud, giving a pet a drink, even a little fire suppression in an emergency. The uses of a pressurized system seem never ending, the most used besides drinking I have found personally is simply a squirt or two every now and then to help cool down on hot days. They also have a wide opening that makes filling easier, as well as you can turn them inside out to wash (they are even dishwasher safe). They use a quick connect hose system, have inline filters available for them, decent mouth pieces standard, a decent amount of add on and after market upgrades.

    Now if they were overly expensive bladders, no matter how cool the features I would have passed. They however are in the same general range as other quality bladders. Their packs are pricey, but then so are some of the other bladder company packs. I wish Geigerrig would sell the packs without the bladder since I bout a bladder by itself to use in my other packs but might consider buying one of their packs if I didn't have to buy the whole system with it.

    Here is a video giving an overview of them, just as easy reference. If really interested please go do your own research, don't take my word.


    All that said, have I stopped singing praises of SS bottles? Not at all. Still love 'em still use them, still advocate they are the best for multi use water carry. I have a narrow neck and wide mouth both 40 oz Klean Kanteen. I am actually debating picking up one of the 64 oz ones as well and currently shopping around for a new insulation cover for the 40 oz bottles I have. The ones I have currently are getting old and should be replaced soon.

    So the short version of all that. SS Bottle is my top choice, but the right bladder has found it's way into my gear load out.
     
  10. CowboyJesus

    CowboyJesus Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2010
    Messages:
    4,019
    Likes Received:
    14,003
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    i have two hydration bladders, a standard nalgene, and stacks of canteens. i've tended towards the canteens lately, being an inbetween-not quite as easy to carry as the bladders, but almost, and not quite as easy to clean as the nalgene, but almost. i also find i'm liking some sort of bottle for cooking and such, as it feels counterintuitive to me to drain the water from a bladder while out on the trail.

    edit after i saw @BradGad -i'm no serious hiker, i'm usually out for the day, rarely even over night. though i will say i've loved bladders when i'm biking for day.
     
    M.Hatfield and JosephDurham like this.
  11. Outdoor Dauber

    Outdoor Dauber Roughian #3 Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2018
    Messages:
    2,725
    Likes Received:
    12,925
    Location:
    Central PA
    I tried a bladder years ago. Didn't like how my body heated it up in the summer, no good way to sanitize it, domdo like sucking on bite valves, can't dip it in a stream to refill...I prefer water bottles or canteens. Wide mouth is preferred.
     
    M.Hatfield and JosephDurham like this.
  12. ineffableone

    ineffableone Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,724
    Likes Received:
    456
    Location:
    Pac Northwest, east of the Cascades
    @Outdoor Dauber You might look at the bladder I mention. It won me over to the dark side of using a bladder. It addresses all but the warming issue, which can be minimized with an insulator and even ice or ice packs.

    Not trying to talk you into a bladder (I still prefer SS bottles), it is just I felt much the same as you so figure worth mentioning you might want to check it out.
     
  13. JAY

    JAY Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,768
    Likes Received:
    4,344
    Location:
    Blue Ridge Mt's.
    Never had or tried a bladder. Always thought they would be to hard to clean properly. Bottles are a lot easier.
     
  14. Outdoor Dauber

    Outdoor Dauber Roughian #3 Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2018
    Messages:
    2,725
    Likes Received:
    12,925
    Location:
    Central PA
    Thanks for the info...but I'm too stubborn and set in my ways now to try and change. Besides, I prefer carbon steel, wool and canvas to titanium, holofill and silnylon. So a water bottle just suits my style better.
     
  15. ineffableone

    ineffableone Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,724
    Likes Received:
    456
    Location:
    Pac Northwest, east of the Cascades
    @Outdoor Dauber I am in the same frame of mind. I tend to go for the natural fibers, more traditional equipment, etc. I can relate very well, like I said no pressure at all just thought it was worth mentioning. I have to say one of the great things I love about this forum, is we can actually admit to liking the more traditional gear and others accept us and even feel similar. While there are the minimalists here, plenty of people who prefer long lasting quality over light weight space age.
     
  16. castle22

    castle22 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Messages:
    345
    Likes Received:
    722
    For backpacking I just use two 1-liter avian bottles because they fit best in the side pockets of my pack. Though my wife prefers a 2 liter bladder and she probably has three times backpacking experience that I do.
     
    M.Hatfield and JosephDurham like this.
  17. Ragman

    Ragman Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,897
    Likes Received:
    4,001
    First of all it's a reservoir, not a bladder, bladders hold urine.
    I use both. On long day hikes, covering several peaks and moving fast, I use a reservoir.
    I don't have to stop to take a drink and I don't have to hear water swooshing around in a half empty bottle.
    For backpacking or canoe camping I use bottles.
     
    M.Hatfield, JeffG and Outdoor Dauber like this.
  18. Ithica

    Ithica Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2012
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    197
    Location:
    Arizona
    I use both a hydration reservoir and bottles. Most of my hikes are over seven miles. A hydration bladder makes sense for longer hikes and hiking in the Arizona Sonoran Desert. I use the Camelbak Antidote and Omega 3-liter hydration reservoirs and never had a leak issue with either. They both have valves and quick release fittings at the bite valve end of the hose. They both have insulated hoses which is great in a hot climate. The quick release fitting is convenient for washing your hands, filling a cup or a dog bowl. Cleaning a reservoir is not difficult and is largely unnecessary if the reservoir is stored in the refrigerator when not in use. I hike 30 plus miles per week and 4 to 5 times per week so there is no stagnant water in my reservoirs. In the past, I used a 3-liter Platypus reservoir and it performed well. In the desert southwest, you have to expect that your water will be carried in and not available in the field. A bladder is more space efficient than three or 4 one-liter Nalgene bottles. In the Spring, Summer, and Fall I carry one liter of water for each hour of hiking or rock scrambling.
     
  19. kronin323

    kronin323 the barbarian Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,731
    Likes Received:
    9,315
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I've been using bladders since the mid '90s. Bike riding, hiking, backpacking. Love them. Never had a problem with leaks or sanitation. Room temp water doesn't bother me. On backpacking trips I'll carry bottles too for extra capacity and for cooking liquid but while hydrating during activity, bladder all the way.

    See, it's more than just different methods of carrying water, everything else being equal. Using a bladder allows you to adopt a different, better hydration methodology.

    Old school, you do your activity, you get thirsty, you pull out your bottle, open it up, have yourself a good drink, don't feel thirsty anymore, put it back, be on your way, repeat.

    But with a hydration bladder, you take frequent small sips of water the entire time, you don't wait to get thirsty first and you don't drink larger amounts in a single drink. More like a constant trickle...

    The idea behind it is this - we all know getting dehydrated is bad and takes a long time to recover. But what many of us commonly consider dehydration is actually an extreme case. In truth, being thirsty itself is an early sign of dehydration. Though not an extreme case, it does still affect your performance and you don't immediately recover as soon as you drink, it takes some time. By the time you feel thirsty it's already too late.

    But by taking frequent small sips, you avoid getting thirsty in the first place and don't deal with the related performance degradation. It really does work.

    Sure, you can attempt the same method with a bottle but it's not very practical, having to pull it out, open it, yada yada for every sip.
     
  20. ineffableone

    ineffableone Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,724
    Likes Received:
    456
    Location:
    Pac Northwest, east of the Cascades
    Your post made me remember something to note here. Let us not forget that water skins (esentially oldschool bladder/reservoir were around a long time ago) were the go to water carry for wilderness travel.

    This type of water skin
    [​IMG]

    Slowly changed over decades and centuries

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    To these not too long ago. Most of us likely remeber these being the water carry choice when we were kids. They are still sold, and there have been some updates to them, but this was basically a water skin modernized.
    [​IMG]

    And so too is a hydration bladder/reservoir. The reason they are called bladder is due to the original water skins were often made from sheep or cow bladders.

    So we went from animal bladders to plastic ones. But in general the idea is still the same even if the materials have changed.
    [​IMG]
     
    insector, Howie, hidden_lion and 7 others like this.
  21. Gruxxx

    Gruxxx NRA Endowment Life Member Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1,849
    Likes Received:
    6,027
    Wide mouthed water bottles only for me. I want nothing to do with warm water heated upon my back, nor the nastiness that grows in those bags.
     
    M.Hatfield, JosephDurham and JeffG like this.
  22. Crusher0032

    Crusher0032 Appalachian Arthfael Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 9, 2016
    Messages:
    2,634
    Likes Received:
    14,824
    Location:
    West Virginia
    Maybe it's because I carried Camelbaks for my entire military career, but I've never had an issue cleaning water reservoirs. Camelbak sells a kit specifically for this with tabs and a hose brush or you can just use a little bleach. I was surprised to read all the responses mentioning how hard they are to clean.

    I like both, because when cooking it is nice to dump water into my pot out of a bottle instead of squeezing it out of the bite valve. I've never had a bite valve leak as long as it was camelbak and not a cheap knock off.

    I use a CNOC Vecto for my dirty water so it's really not that different than filling a reservoir in a creek if I wanted to, and my Sawyer will go right in line on my drinking tube if need be.

    The reservoir also has better weight distribution than a bottle hanging off the side of a pack. With my Baltoro, I've never noticed my water getting hot on my back, but there is a pretty good curve in the frame to allow airflow back there. Even using my MULE I don't recall having especially hot water from being on my back, but everyone's different.

    Just like to have options I guess.
     
  23. rocketbomb

    rocketbomb Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    1,182
    Likes Received:
    1,027
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Hydration bladder, unless its below freezing. It's much easier to stay hydrated on the move with the bladder. Stopping frequently enough and removing a pack to get to a water bottle is a lot of work with a 30-40lb pack, and even with a daypack, it's just unnecessary stops when all I want is a quick sip while on the move.

    A bottle is nice when a lot of time will be spent in camp, but if I am backpacking, I'm not often spending lots of time at a camp. Below freezing, the hose on a bladder tends to freeze up so I admit defeat and switch to insulated bottles.

    Some packs do have pouches for bottles on the shoulder straps, but I do not like heavy items hanging from the shoulder straps.
     
  24. backlasher

    backlasher nothing to do and all day to do it in Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 4, 2013
    Messages:
    7,023
    Likes Received:
    12,123
    Location:
    Gulf Coast, Texas
    Me too.
     
    M.Hatfield and JeffG like this.
  25. ra2bach

    ra2bach Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2014
    Messages:
    5,772
    Likes Received:
    8,834
    Location:
    ATL
    on the move I'm a sipper so I prefer the bladder. if I'm stationary I use a bottle. it's easier to pour from and I mix my energy drinks.

    backpacking, I use both - bladder for walking, bottle in camp. and I use a softbottle like the Sawyer Squeeze bags or Platypus for filtering...
     
  26. Smokey Radley

    Smokey Radley Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    1,484
    Likes Received:
    2,279
    Location:
    Oklahoma, USA
    I like my hydration bladder for backpacking days when I'm moving fast and hitting high mileage. The rest of the time I'm all bottle.
     
    JosephDurham and JeffG like this.
  27. PACoureurDuBois

    PACoureurDuBois For God and Country --AISI #49-- Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2018
    Messages:
    1,166
    Likes Received:
    7,441
    Location:
    Elk County
    Bladders are nice, but they hold water. That's about it.

    I'm in the canteen camp, for ease of field water purification, and canteen-cup sterilization.
     
  28. snapper

    snapper Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    1,337
    Likes Received:
    1,984
    Location:
    central NYS
    Personally, while I might bring a bladder for extra water storage in camp, I only use bottles while hiking/paddling/backcountry skiing, etc. Knowing my personality, I like having to take the time to get my water bottle out and take a real break. It allows me to "sit and smell the roses" if you get my drift. I also like the fact that I can see how much water I have left. With a hidden away bladder, and my drinking habits in warm weather, I'm afraid I'd run out without ever knowing it. My guess is I could eventually work out a system that allows me to use a bladder but honestly, I really enjoy stopping, pulling out my water bottle and sitting on a rock or log while watching the world go by. It's what makes my breaks so relaxing so I'll just stick with what I know.

    That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

    snapper
     
  29. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Messages:
    1,580
    Likes Received:
    5,501
    Location:
    NYC
    wondered same thing about cleaning
    I disinfect my gear about 1-2 times a year, just soak it in a bleach solution, do the same for bladder, bottles, mess kit, etc.
    hose/bite valve all comes apart for easy cleaning
    as for leaking I have a camelback pure flow, bite valve has always leaked, I usually carry it empty then fill it up at camp so quick easy water supply at camp,
    my camelback has leaked since new(older model with squeeze type bite valve), camelback did send me a replacement bite valve that did the same thing,
    even at camp, if I leave tube dangling below bladder it drips and leaks, I have to make sure tube is placed above bladder so doesn't leak, not a big deal,
    a bite valve with a shut off would be better,
     
    JosephDurham and JeffG like this.
  30. ra2bach

    ra2bach Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2014
    Messages:
    5,772
    Likes Received:
    8,834
    Location:
    ATL
    there's a lot of misconceptions here about using a bladder. I first started seeing them when my motorcycling buddies started showing up with Camelbacks.

    they looked stupid all sucking on their "pacifiers" at a rest stop but I quickly realized I could drink on the move even with a helmet on. later, while backpacking, I came to the same realization and added one to my gear.

    a bladder lets me drink while moving and carries water in the most efficient location (high and center). and for some reason, I've never experienced the dreaded hot water from being against my back. maybe it just doesn't bother me or maybe my packs all isolate it enough but whatever, it's not an issue for me.

    they are inconvenient in camp, can be difficult to refill inside a full pack, and are heavier than 2 of my 32oz Gatorade or 1L Smartwater bottles but I've decided the juice is worth the squeeze on this particular item.

    also, having used bladders for years, I've never had "the funk" that so many people worry about. Don't store you bladder with any water in it and this won't happen.

    if I don't use all the water in the bladder each day, I just empty it completely into my cooking pot or other bottle and replace it with clean water I just filtered. I've used Source bladders and a Platypus Big Zip for several years and never had to scrub them or rinse with Clorox, etc...
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019
  31. squishware

    squishware Troubleshooter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    615
    Likes Received:
    3,611
    Location:
    Carlsbad, CA
    Bite valves taste terrible. Bottles all the way.
     
    M.Hatfield, JosephDurham and JeffG like this.
  32. Lars

    Lars Angry German Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,644
    Likes Received:
    7,481
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    I started with bottles then went to hydration bladders then bottles then hydration bladders and now back to bottles. Currently I like bottles because I can keep track of how much I am drinking and know exactly how much water is left without opening the backpack.
     
  33. 66drifter

    66drifter Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    2,041
    Likes Received:
    6,235
    Location:
    between Ft Worth & the RED RIVER
    dehydration can put a serious crimp in your style if you don't catch it in time

    if you wait too long your steps will be severely limited

    and getting back up to speed can TAKE A WHILE...

    once overcome one becomes more susceptible in the future(the rest of your life)

    knot a bad philosophy :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2019 at 12:33 PM
  34. leghog

    leghog Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2018
    Messages:
    844
    Likes Received:
    4,238
    Location:
    3.99 ft east of 4 ft west of here
    Bottles only and recycled at that. Cheaper. Easier replaced. Easier to clean.
     
    insector and M.Hatfield like this.
  35. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    3,788
    Likes Received:
    10,908
    Location:
    southern california
    Both are valued both have their place .
     
  36. leghog

    leghog Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2018
    Messages:
    844
    Likes Received:
    4,238
    Location:
    3.99 ft east of 4 ft west of here
    MDs and medical scientists now say otherwise, stating thirst is simply you body's way to tell you to drink. If you do that your body's water deficit will be nil or trivial. Simply drink once you are thirsty. Now if you ignore the thirst and don't drink, that thirst is often then accompanied by excessive sweating, decreased urine, headache, fatigue, lethargy, cramping, dizziness --- then it's too late and is dangerous. The solution? Drink when you are thirsty.
     
  37. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Messages:
    1,580
    Likes Received:
    5,501
    Location:
    NYC
    I still use one of these on occasions, moreso for sentimental reasons than any practical reasons,
     
  38. hillst1

    hillst1 Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2009
    Messages:
    1,284
    Likes Received:
    2,842
    Location:
    North Carolina
  39. funkja

    funkja Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2012
    Messages:
    407
    Likes Received:
    865
    Location:
    Central Iowa
    I use a camelback 100 ounce (3liter) in my hiking pack and a Nalgene in camp. the problem I have with the reservoir is I tend to drink an EXCESSIVE amount of water when hiking with one and have to stop every mile or 3 to take a leak lol. sitting in camp I drop 2 Nuun electrolyte tabs in the nalgene and keep it filled up from the reservoir.
     
    ra2bach, JosephDurham and kronin323 like this.
  40. fx77

    fx77 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2011
    Messages:
    393
    Likes Received:
    649
    I am probably wrong, but hike with bottles
    I have without any testing , always felt that the bladder is a portable petri dish.. :)
     
    insector and JosephDurham like this.
  41. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2013
    Messages:
    6,564
    Likes Received:
    28,350
    Location:
    Montana
    for running mountain races I will use a bladder, the ability to drink on the run (literally :)) is extremely valuable; if it's a long race it can be refilled at an aid station

    for backpacking I like to use a 20 oz bottle (old gatorade bottle) and carry it on my shoulder strap, it's easily accessible and I can readily see what I've drank and how much is left. if I'm in a very water rich environ, it's all I'll carry- sterilizing as I go, if less water rich I'll carry a Platypus bottle that is stowed in the pack- size dependent on how readily water is available
     
  42. aaronu

    aaronu Armchair Bushcrafter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2013
    Messages:
    2,425
    Likes Received:
    5,031
    Location:
    Marysville, WA
    Metal bottles are my primary. Either two 27 oz Klean Kanteens in a pack or a single 40 oz wide mouth with cup, lid and stove carried in a haversack. If needed i sometimes carry supplemental water storage, with Platy bottles or the collapsible ones from 5col.

    Never felt that getting a water bottle before I could drink was much of an imposition.

    OTOH my son favors a hydration bladder. I bet he would like the Geigerrig setup. Right now he uses a Source bladder.
     
  43. JosephDurham

    JosephDurham Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2015
    Messages:
    2,011
    Likes Received:
    8,840
    Location:
    Bethel, Ohio
    I appreciate everyone’s responses. Wide variety of opinions and I appreciate them all.

    I just got a new pack for backpacking, a Deuter ACT 30 and have been researching the hydration bladders a lot.

    D8DC4707-C505-4E7F-B45B-3D290D3E7F35.jpeg

    I was going to go with the Geigerrig but not sure how the pressure pump would work. So, as of right now, I am leaning towards the platypus big zip. Easy to clean, easy to fill, et cetera. Will most likely bounce back and forth, but I figure the platypus will allow for easier drinking while hiking.
     
    insector likes this.
  44. ineffableone

    ineffableone Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,724
    Likes Received:
    456
    Location:
    Pac Northwest, east of the Cascades
    Just my 2 cents on Giegerrig, my other posts likely show I am a fan of these.

    The Giegerrig pressure pump works great, if you have your pack stuffed with stuff that actually makes it so you don't have to pump as much to get pressure. Nothing is easier to drink from than a pressurized system. It squirts into your mouth rather than having to suck.

    Now that said, trying to match to a nongeigerrig pack means you likely won't have a separate exit port for the pressure hose from the bladder pocket, and might have to have the pressure hose on the same strap as the drinking hose. Though if the port exiting the pack's bladder pocket is central you might be able to have the hoses on separate straps.

    This would be something to consider for you trying to get the right bladder for the existing pack you have. I am not familiar with that pack you have so can't say how it would work. I can say I bought the Giegerrig without their pack and have been using it with Mystery Ranch Crew Cab, ILBE, and Maxpedition packs with no serious issues. Only reason I am considering finding a Giegerrig pack is I wouldn't mind a dedicated just bladder and minimal gear pack to wear around the homestead while working. Something light and simple just for the use of the bladder to drink from while working. Right now I have to use a water bottle since all my packs are too big to use as just a water source.
     
    kronin323 and JosephDurham like this.
  45. JosephDurham

    JosephDurham Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2015
    Messages:
    2,011
    Likes Received:
    8,840
    Location:
    Bethel, Ohio
    Just found this
     
    ineffableone likes this.
  46. Woodsman Wannabe

    Woodsman Wannabe Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2014
    Messages:
    400
    Likes Received:
    572
    Location:
    SE Texas
    I used to run 6 miles a day with a hydration pack strapped on. I would freeze a small amount of water in the reservoir over night and it would help keep me cool, as well as the water.
    When I am on the mower, I strap on the hydration pack. Same when I am riding the bicycle.
    When I go for a hike, I tend to take a couple of bottles.

    So the answer in my case is it depends on what I am doing, and what my preference is for that day.......
     
    insector and JosephDurham like this.
  47. ROCK6

    ROCK6 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2010
    Messages:
    712
    Likes Received:
    656
    Location:
    Georgia
    Both. My wife and tested both options and decided on bladders while hiking with a bottle backup. I use a lightweight Osprey 2.5L bladder that I can filter directly into without having to pull it out of the pack. I also pack a 750ml Smart Water bottle with the sports cap. The bottle is just easier for many of the tasks needing water. The hydration bladders are just much easier to use while on the trail with little to no hassle. While we typically fill up at the next available water sources, I know I typically drink about a liter of water during the heat/humidity of the day in the Southeast; so, about 4-6 miles depending on terrain for fill-up planning.

    Along with the hydration bladder and Smart Water bottle, I have a couple of Sawyer (graywater) squeeze bags, and a 2-liter Evernew collapsible canteen. If water sources are slim for several miles, we'll tank up and use the extra water containers.

    ROCK6
     
  48. TheRambler

    TheRambler Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    984
    Location:
    CT
    I have had multiple camelbak failures over the years and have finally given up on them. They always fail at the most inopportune time too it seems. They do greatly aid in staying hydrated though. Never had an issue with one in a day pack, they seem to not hold up in the long term in a larger/full pack.

    I carry a msr dromedary to have in camp, but keep it empty in the pack unless hauling it to a dry campsite. It seems far more rubust than a typical camelbak etc

    On the move I now use a mother carrier so my water is easy to access and doesn’t require me to take off my pack or otherwise fuss with retrieving and returning bottles to/from their pockets.
     
    insector likes this.
  49. BushcraftMonk

    BushcraftMonk Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2019
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    88
    Location:
    Center of the Europe (Lithuania)
    I'm using my Russian Canteen for water. Simple, lightweight and of course you have extra items from this set.

    [​IMG]
     
    insector and gila_dog like this.
  50. gila_dog

    gila_dog Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Messages:
    3,416
    Likes Received:
    9,979
    Location:
    New Mexico
    For me it's a Nalgene bottle. They last forever, and don't grow any nasty biology in them like bladders and tubes do. I have to take it out of my pack to drink, but that's ok. I need to stop and take a break sometimes anyway.
    I have several scattered among my different vehicles. I only put clean water (from my well at home) in them. No juice, tea, etc.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019

Share This Page