I got a thing for chopper Knives! DO YOU??

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by Bax 40, Jul 1, 2018.

  1. Bax 40

    Bax 40 Supporter Supporter

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    I have always been a fan of large knives, guess I watched too many movies, cant remember when I was not fascinated by Bowie style knives and other large blades.

    Reading about the battle of San Jacinto , both sides had single shot rifles and pistols and it was mostly decided by large knives, short swords and bayonets after the first shots fired.
    Must have been brutal!

    While not being a soldier or a knife fighter I have always liked the idea of a chopping sized knife for clearing and general camp use and still have a bunch and use them often.
    Some of these pictured have moved on to new homes but many reside with me still, I still love em!!

    Thanks for looking, Larry
    sales 031.jpg sales 001.jpg sales 004.jpg sales 006.jpg knives 002 - Copy (3).jpg Copy (4) of knives 011.JPG Copy (14) of knives 014.JPG Copy (17) of knives 001.JPG Copy of DSC01678.JPG Copy (14) of knives 003.JPG
     
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  2. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Bushmaster

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    You need to give the kukri a try.
    IMG_20171112_143355.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2018
  3. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

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    You're in good company @Bax 40 :)

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  4. Jacob

    Jacob Supporter Supporter

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    Wow! What a beautiful collection. I love choppers too, despite using them less than just about any other edged tools I own. They’re just fun! I’ll try to post some pics tomorrow.

    Thanks for sharing.
     
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  5. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I too love and use big knives, but mine don't get near enough wear & tear like @NWPrimate 's do!
     
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  6. Muleman77

    Muleman77 Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    That's a beautiful collection @Bax 40!
     
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  7. JD Miller

    JD Miller Scout

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    Go big or go home !
    Just a few of mine

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    Last edited: Jul 1, 2018
  8. Greebe

    Greebe Non ducor, duco. Supporter

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    My biggest knife is the Condor Mini Duku Parang. I really like this knife. Participated in the Skrama pass around two winters ago and really liked it as well.
    IMG_2117.jpg
     
  9. T. Pollock

    T. Pollock T's Custom Outdoor Gear Vendor Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Me love big choopa too. :dblthumb:

    Nice collection @Bax 40 I especially like the cleaver style blade, first pic top right.
     
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  10. Prairiewolf

    Prairiewolf Supporter Supporter

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    I share Bax 40's appreciation of larger, choppy blades. They see a lot more use than my fleet of axes in my time spent at my MIL's small farm in the county north of my home. I have tools that I leave there, tools in my vehicle, and tools at home that I don't want to risk the hazard of theft by low-lifes. The choppers see a lot of duty maintaining trails through the brushy, hilly property and also busting up big tree limbs that often blow down in the yard. I like to do natural ground blinds for deer hunting using a chopper and sometimes also a small saw or ax. They all become sort of a family that I enjoy messing with, but the choppers are by far the most useful in my activities.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2018
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  11. Mr. Tettnanger

    Mr. Tettnanger Supporter Supporter

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    Big knife fan here as well!

    I am down to just a few now. I sure miss a bunch of them!
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2018
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  12. cbrianroll

    cbrianroll Professional Tinkerer Supporter

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    Very nice! I need some lol...the cleaver one is fantastic!
     
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  13. slysir

    slysir Guide

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    I've got to get some more recent pictures. Most of mine aren't as pretty anymore!!

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    -John
     
  14. adkwalker

    adkwalker Supporter Supporter

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    Your collection is amazing!
    Kevin
     
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  15. IzaWildman

    IzaWildman Grey Dog Supporter

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    @Bax 40 , that's some beautiful steel! Very nice collection.
     
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  16. Muskett

    Muskett Scout

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    The Blackjack Marauder II was my first successful big chopper that I purchased; circa 1989/90. I was younger and fitter then, and this knife could compete chop wise with the GB SFA. Importantly it was tough enough. The picture here is my second one, the first was stolen when moving house. That first one I beat it hard and cleaved through a ton of work. Think they were Aus 6 or 8 steel and only $80 or so??
    I'm older now and find it too heavy to control fully committed; switched to the lighter Skrama.
    IMG_4909.JPG
    Selection of my chopping blades:
    IMGP4172.JPG IMGP4175.JPG
    The custom Blackjack Samba middle is featherweight and paper thin; its too springy for anything but foliage.
    The Dorset Blades Jungle Parang is a heavyweight and could cut a helicopter landing strip. Input from John Hudson the Survival Instructor. Again too heavy and powerful for me.
    The red handled is a small Village Parang, a Ray Mears favorite. These are limited in use by the steel and heat treatment which is on the softer side to what Western knife enthusiasts like; but for native village people then ease of sharpening is more important, they don't have diamond sharpening kits.

    These last two are what I like to use now. Nice weight, good chop, and very controllable. I'm not cleaving logs but cutting poles and sticks. Coppicing sticks, like hazel, mainly 1" or so, from which I can build just about anything. Skrama which we all know about. The other a snedding blade, Eban Parang by Ben Orford.
    IMGP7533.JPG

    I don't mind taking longer to get a job done, I pace myself more, just less in a rush. I also like my own tools that I'm familiar with. A present pet hate of mine is when friends want you to do something with their tools; as generally their tools are crap! I don't like having the wrong tool for the job.
    Maybe I'm just getting to be an old dog....
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2018
  17. JohnP

    JohnP No more half measures Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Very nice collection, @Bax 40. I like all size knives from little neckers to big ole choppers.

    JohnP
     
  18. central joe

    central joe Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Nice collection you have @Bax 40, I am glad to hear that you use them and not just collect them. joe
     
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  19. Bax 40

    Bax 40 Supporter Supporter

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    I have a couple kukris and love em!

    The MP cleaver is one of my faves, very useful.

    Larry
     
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  20. gila_dog

    gila_dog Supporter Supporter

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    Here are my big knives. They all get used for rough work sometimes, so they aren't very pretty.

    USMC Kabar

    upload_2018-7-2_9-53-44.jpeg


    Very old Old Hickory butcher knife with home made sheath.

    upload_2018-7-2_9-55-28.jpeg


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    Old Ghurka army kukri.

    upload_2018-7-2_9-59-28.jpeg
     
  21. SpookyPistolero

    SpookyPistolero Slow learner Lifetime Supporter

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    Big Knives are very handy. Especially in summer. Mg khukri and bk9 are definitely my favorites, but the Kabar Heavy Bowie was my first 'survival' knife when I was young, so it also holds a special place.

    Khuk on last outing
    [​IMG]
     
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  22. Gruntinhusaybah

    Gruntinhusaybah Hobbyist Hobbyist Supporter Bushclass I

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    Last edited: Jul 3, 2018
  23. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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  24. Oiler20

    Oiler20 Scout

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    I like the one in the first pic with the stacked leather handle!
     
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  25. Bax 40

    Bax 40 Supporter Supporter

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    That's a Marbles, Trailmaster is the modal
    believe.

    Larry
     
  26. haunted

    haunted Guide

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    excellent but thats not what he meant when he yelled "get to da choppa"
     
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  27. DomC

    DomC Retired Old Scrub Stomper Supporter

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    IMG_0084.JPG
    OKC Ranger RD-7
    BLADE: 7 1/2" LONG X 1 /4" THICK 5160 STEEL, FFG w/ convexed secondary via WorkSharp.
    HANDLE: Orange G-10.
    This was my first (but not my last) choppa bought in 2010.
    Dominick........
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2018
  28. Muskett

    Muskett Scout

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    The Combat Knife or large sheath knife I don't consider a chopping tool. They don't get far with a lot of effort. They will be always popular as they are as much blade as can fit on the belt. A well constructed folder can do almost the same in an even smaller package now. Even multitools are taking over in the military, and the handgun over last ditch weapon of choice if the rifle was to stop firing.
    These are a few of mine:
    IMGP7763.JPG IMGP7753.JPG IMGP7777.JPG
    Of the Combat styles then my CR Project I used and carried for many years (had it reconditioned when I retired, which is why its looking quite nice) is my preferred style and scale. I'm starting to go a bit Bushcraft style as shown by the Survive Knives's GSO on the right in the last picture. I have a Terava 110 and 140 too. 5" blade will do Bushcraft fixed blade.
    I do miss the lack of "pointy" on bushcraft styles. I also miss the 7" reach of the CR Project.
    But again they don't chop for toffee as they just don't have the weight/beef to be efficient. They are just a longer cutting edge. If you require cutting logs in half then add a saw.

    I have never really got on with Kukris, I leave those to the Gurkhas. The Kukri weapon to me starts as a WWI variant, and has the cleave of an entrenching tool. Gurkhas use machete's in the jungle, and a folder for opening MRE's. Their Kukris are used for camp work and last ditch weapon; plus they scare the sht out of the enemy and rightly so. These are fit and fast guys and behind all the smiles are professional soldiers with real skill.....crafty too, I'm delighted they are on my side. Respect.

    The older I get the more specialised I like my tools. I can get my pocket knife to do a lot of work, but for chopping then that requires something substantial. A very large blade or an axe. Not many knives can do the job of an axe, well not if you want to do some real work.
    A small knife and saw will be ,ore useful in most cases than a whopper chopper.
    But lets not get too practical and lose all the fun factor that big blades give. I can wear both hats; and even a hard hat with chainsaw.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2018
  29. Kyle363

    Kyle363 Supporter Supporter

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    I was into large knives and choppers but over time my tastes have changed to prefer hatchets, tomahawks, and axes. I just find them to be more efficient and I have more control. I do have to say it can be a lot of fun to swing a big knife around. I still have a few large knives but I don't find myself using them.
     
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  30. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    I get the love of big honkin knives. But honestly for outdoors I've never found a place in my kit. I had a bowie with a 12 inch blade. To big for common tasks. To heavy to hip carry all day. Not as good as a hatchet for firewood. I stepped down to a 7 inch blade bowie. Now I have bahco/mora 3 inch blade. With the hatchet it's ideal. Razor sharp and easy to keep that way. Light in the hand and precise. Cost was $10 so I can abuse or lose it with no big loss.
    Cheers Jim
     
  31. OrienM

    OrienM Guide

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    I like 'em, I like 'em a lot :). Out here in the desert, a big knife/machete is much more useful than an axe or a smaller knife, IMO. Most of my favorites have had blades around 9".

    Lots of beauties in this thread, too...:dblthumb:

    EDIT: found a picture of my current fave. Self-made, forged from some odd little leaf spring, hollow socket handle with epoxied hemp wrap, heat-shaped PVC scabbard with paracord belt. The blade is under 1/8" thick, and fairly light in weight. It's nicely scratched up and grubby from use, too, lol...:D

    parang.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2018
  32. DomC

    DomC Retired Old Scrub Stomper Supporter

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    I solved that by investing in a Baldric carry system...... IMG_0071.JPG
    A Badgerclaw Baldric carry system for my Terava Skrama......
    Dominick......
     
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  33. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    Hard to tell from the pic. Is it a shoulder sling? When you look at historical origins of big blades. They were always purpose built. If you hunted buffalo and had to chop bone. You bet give me a massive bowie. You might have had a pocket folder/small fixed for fine cuts and common tasks. Heavy work and fighting was bowie country. Kukri same thing. A farm tool first. A utility blade second. A weapon third. Cleavers and butcher knives also purpose built for heavy work. I don't hunt big game. I've found a hatchet more efficient for firewood than a big blade. My two cents! ;)
    Cheers Jim
     
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  34. DomC

    DomC Retired Old Scrub Stomper Supporter

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    Yepper. A baldric system distributes the weight onto your shoulders.
    Dominick.........
     
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  35. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    I think my attachment to big blades was the fact that dad had a concrete saw made into a machete we used for opening the 50 # bags of cement .so from the time I was 7-8 years old that represented a real knife . I've had loads of knives and even made them on the bench grinder as a kid and still preferred the heavy blade .
    The one that always goes with me in the woods is a Western Bowie.
    DSCN4162.JPG
    It's a heavy enough blade to have good kinetic value while striking yet nimble enough to be aggressive where it counts . Processing wood or skinning it covers most needs . Although I must admit, I like to preserve the edges of certain tools for serious work, and use baser tools (hatchet and saw) for menial work like processing wood . I won't hesitate to bring out the big knife if the trail needs made through brush ,not something a hatchet or saw are efficiently good at . Right tool for the job.
     
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  36. sons of scotland

    sons of scotland Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    nice collection of choppers... i really like that parang, any info on that would be appreciated.
     
  37. Zunga

    Zunga Bushmaster

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    My home made version. The shoulder strap is attached to a binocular bag as a tool kit. My folding saw along side. I stole the sheath from another knife. Bound and taped the sheath to the strap. It's a easy reverse grip draw. ;)
    Cheers Jim
    20180703_064108.jpg
     
  38. Muskett

    Muskett Scout

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    DomC rig is similar to my own:
    IMGP8148.JPG
    IMGP9905.JPG

    So many of us use backpack which is ideal to carry a bigger blade.
    IMGP4218.JPG

    For the really heavy duty choppers and axes its the truck. Old timers it was the mule, or wagon.
    With modern camping kit and leisure time no one is staying about building log cabins.

    Frontiersmen of old just bought, used, and customised, the trade butchers blades that trading Posts would have. They carried what was needed and nothing more. Bigger projects they took a full tool box of wood working tools. They worked as efficiently as they could with the technology available; the man power was there and worked until the work was done. To earn your daily bread was physically grafting, days and days of it. A job, not playing with it.

    The history of the big bowie is fascinating. Sadly I don't have the knowledge to give the subject full justice. There was the practical and the fashionable, and their prominence was quite localised and time frame short.

    I'm sure people are getting bored of me banging on about the Skrama, I only found it a few years back. I love them, my thinking man's golok. But it really does fit nicely into the modern blade armoury. The medium parangs do too. A new class of design that goes somewhere between Combat/Sheath/Bushcraft/Hunting knife, and the long Machete or Axe/Hatchet. All have their own class and place. There isn't a tool that can do it all, whatever some like to hype up.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2018
  39. DomC

    DomC Retired Old Scrub Stomper Supporter

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    A very comfortable rig to carry heavy knives. Sorry for lack of better foto compositions.....these are taken by myself........
    Dominick.........
     
  40. Muskett

    Muskett Scout

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    Nice rig ^
    Don't forget the Billhooks, Ditch Blades, Froes, Bush Slashers, Cane Cutters; a whole host of agricultural tools.
    IMGP9915.JPG
     
  41. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Billhooks are awesome. With the right kind of practice I think a person could hold off a small horde with one.
     
  42. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Bushmaster

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    More pics first one has been added to post #2
    IMG_20171022_151025.jpg
    IMG_20171022_150834.jpg
    IMG_20171022_150454.jpg
    IMG_20171022_150912.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2018
  43. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    I have an old native made krukri but I'm not sure it will stand up to work . I am so tempted to dismantle the handle and inspect the tang .
    Even then I really don't need to use it, I have other knives.
     
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  44. Muskett

    Muskett Scout

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    Swords had stick tangs. Kukris have stick tangs. Billhooks have stick tangs. Loads of tools have them and have worked hard enough to build the great wooden oak battleships and buildings of yesteryear. Its a very modern thing this full tang must have.
    Some of it is modern steels are heat treated harder to give a longer lasting edge. They then require more steel to counter the brittleness. Plus manufacturers don't need the publicity of their knives breaking when they have charges 100's $'s for something. Older steels were heat treated softer and even the best steels of yore were no where near as good as todays. People expected tools to break and had the blacksmith to mend them; heck the blacksmith probably made it. A sword needed to last at least one battle at a time. Most people were practical enough to maintain their tools, and sharpen them every night. Most blades were thin to cut with. Or stout to chisel with. They rarely tried to get a tool to do it all. Tools were expensive so not abused, just made and used for their intended purpose.

    I've broken many a full tang knife, and for all the modern hype the modern attitude to use doesn't make them any more reliable than older tools in my experience. I like to think every blade has some luck built in, and some just have more luck than others. Certainly the manufacturer's hype has little reflection in what luck the blade has, though manufacturers with the better reputations should give a little more confidence that they do. So should the price. Sadly, its not always true. If you want to play safe then get a softer heat treated blade and sharpen it often as it will need to be.
    Blades have also got thicker. Why? Thickness doesn't mean stronger if the heat treatment isn't right. Then because its thick users think they can give them even more grief. There are plenty of y tube examples of thick blades breaking like anything else out there if given enough stress, strain, and harmonic abuse. Thick stock blades whatever the grind just don't cut like a thin kitchen knife, but then a kitchen knife can't be used as a pry bar!!??

    A lot of how a knife fares is in the attitude of the user and their confidence in the knife.
    Knives I have bought and then decided I don't like I give a really bad time to. I usual find a way to abuse to destruction because I'm not a nice guy. A few just won't die! Those are probably far better knives than I've given credit to. I have a Benchmade folder that has a tanto blade and it refuses to die.
    Other knives I love and usually do well. Really annoying if they do fail and fail without abuse. That knocks ones confidence.
    Again its luck what luck is in any blade, at any price, is anyone's guess. Buy the knife you like from a company, custom maker, with a good reputation, and take it from there. If its still doing its job ten years on its got the luck. Do try and buy one that fits your hand and suits the work you do. You will need more than one style. The knife that says its a one tool option probably does it all badly.

    My last little niggle is there are far too many expensive knives not being used. How can it be fantastic if it has never been tested in work for an extensive time? Art knives being the exception, as they are bought for their looks, artistic skill.

    Sorry that was a bit lofty; think I'll go and play with my large Sebenza. That can't chop for toffee either, but it can cut and I like it. I have about a dozen knives that are old friends and I reach for depending on what I'm doing, what shoes or boots I'm wearing. Own a SAK, Opinel, Leatherman, Silky Saw, Cold Steel SRK, Tramontina Machete, and a GB Axe and then try and find something that betters these, or something that is missing in this armoury. Its quite difficult, though really easy too spend loads of £$'s trying. Part of the fun of it all.
    Think twise, cut once. Have fun, stay safe.
     
  45. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    [​IMG]

    D. Aune. 7 1/2" x 1 1/4" x 5/16" 1084/ saber/convex
     
  46. Bax 40

    Bax 40 Supporter Supporter

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    Folks have mentioned Baldrics and billhooks so here are some of mine and some other big blades in my collection.


    Larry Copy (5) of knives 024.JPG Copy (7) of knives 022.JPG Copy (7) of knives 015.JPG Copy (2) of knives 003.JPG Copy (2) of knives 024.JPG Copy (5) of knives 009.JPG Copy (6) of knives 006.JPG Copy (7) of knives 012.JPG Copy (8) of knives 020.JPG Copy (9) of knives 008.JPG
     
  47. Muskett

    Muskett Scout

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    Bax40 you have some fantastic knives in your collection. Everyone you chose because they had something you liked about them. Its a hobby in its own right, and straight forward good fun. There is a lot that goes into making a good knife,
    Not every knife will turn out great, but without some bad ones then how does one know a good one? The more you get into the subject the more there is.

    I used to buy a knife every year, no matter what. Then I got married and had children... boys toys had to calm down. In fact a few had to be moved on. But everyone added to the big picture.
    Now it takes something "interesting" to get me to buy. I'm a succour for classics. I have got to the point that the ones I keep I use.
    Sometimes its "just because":
    IMG_4408.JPG
    Yes thats a circa 1900 boomerang, possibly earlier.

    I've said what I needed to. I look forward to others to add to the thread (plus I've got some work to do).
    Its fun this.
     
  48. freebirdfb

    freebirdfb Bushmaster

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    Here is one that I don't use very often due to being a discounted model. Cold Steel Mini Gurka Light.Because of the blurry cell phone pic, here is a stock image from the net.
    [​IMG]
    IMG_20170410_203035.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2018
  49. Jacob

    Jacob Supporter Supporter

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    6B56EAD6-7D4B-42E3-A33A-56E41AC55CED.jpeg

    59921E47-2174-4F55-AECB-84109F40DA82.jpeg

    12632582-3167-43B9-9407-C54C7F6101E9.jpeg

    9456076E-3A96-4575-98C2-1415186D0161.jpeg

    Kuhkri modding in progress from @NevadaBlue, will pass this one around when it’s done. 3/8” thick.
    BA028F84-15D6-4E9A-9AE1-CF920AA68F52.jpeg

    Old pic but just to shiny not to share.
    A8769E25-0C9B-4496-A12C-DEE741E8E7B9.jpeg
     
    Fixedblade, cek, deckard313 and 13 others like this.
  50. Bax 40

    Bax 40 Supporter Supporter

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    I had very little other than food and a roof over my head when I was a child, got out and hustled work at a early age, never had time for sports or much else, did get involved with the scouts and

    gained a love for knives and the outdoors at that time, got a .22 and went crazy for guns, started a family at 17 , got a job with a big company and retired at 47 , have not hit a lick at anything

    that I did not want to since but have collected blades, axes and guns every time I had some spare change and at 74 still am accumulating STUFF, my wife of 45 years has no problem with that

    either and actually encourages me to get whatever I want.

    I make no apologies for my consumerism having earned everything I have and freely admit I am at my age much more of a collector than a bush crafter or doer of anything.

    I hope that in the few years I have left I never lose my enthusiasm for life, stuff and new experiences.

    The capitalistic life style fits me fine and wish the best for all my friends, personal and forum too.

    Some very fine blades showing up here and am glad others share my desire for big knives.

    Life is short, play hard!!

    Larry
     
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