Is 45 degrees at night too cold for hammock

Discussion in 'Hammocks' started by sweet trav, Sep 8, 2019.

  1. sweet trav

    sweet trav Guide

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    I have a camping trip coming up and the night temps will be in the mid 40s...is that too cold for hammock camping with a decent 0 degree sleeping bag?

    Thanks for any help...this will be my first attempt at actually spending the night in a hammock if I go that route.

    ...also, I do have a klymit air mattress...
     
  2. Togus

    Togus Echo of the Loon Supporter

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    No. I’d add an under quilt to insulate from beneath.
     
  3. JAY

    JAY Guide

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    I'll be following this thread, as I am looking at hammocks as well. And I HATE snakes.
     
  4. cstrickland

    cstrickland Scout

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    It really depends on your tolerance. I am comfortable down to low 20,s with no wind and a good under quilt.
     
  5. sweet trav

    sweet trav Guide

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    I dont have an underquilt and probably wont get one before our trip...would it still be doable with maybe a wool blanket lining the inside of the hammock?
     
  6. Togus

    Togus Echo of the Loon Supporter

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    Yes, you may or may not be chilly. 45 ain’t too cold. You could use the wool blanket as an under quilt. Lying on the material obviously compressed it, reducing the insulating value, so using the wool blanket as an under quilt may help.
     
  7. Luchtaine

    Luchtaine MOA #22 Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I Bushclass Instructor

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    You should be ok. I hammock at those temps with a Klymit static V luxe pad and a north face 20° down bag.
     
  8. Foilist

    Foilist Guide

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    You need bottom insulation. Seriously.

    A ten dollar truck windshield sun reflector works surprisingly well, if you aren't ready to spring for an underquilt.

    You can also rig up a poncho liner as a 45 degree underquilt pretty easily.
     
  9. to Ha

    to Ha Supporter Supporter

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    It depends on how cold you sleep. I can tell you from the experience of many (not all) that an insulated pad underneath should do fine as long as you stay on pad - shoulders tend to get chilled due to hammock cradling your body, allowing shoulders to be virtually exposed due to insulation compression. An uninsulated pad at those temps leave most hangers COLD! And even a 0 deg Top Quilt / bag won't prevent it.

    For someone not getting an UQ, I recommend getting two CCF blue pads (like from Wally World) and overlap them slightly to provide good width.
     
  10. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    I hate anything in the hammock with me . It always ends up bunched up around my butt .
    If you double over a poncho liner and rig it with elastic cord under your hammock you should be good at 45 . Single layer poncho liner ,I don’t think so .
    I have built 3 or 4 insulated hammocks which iI use down to about 20 degrees then I add an underquilt and go down well below zero .
    Hammocks much warmer then sleeping on the ground .
    If you have a large old sleeping bag you can cut a hole in either end and string your hammock inside the bag .
    I have done this with the M49 mountain bag with great success .
     
  11. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    I think it goes like this . Start with a base of 70 degrees .
    inches of thickness for under quilt
    1 inch 50
    2 inch 30
    3 inch 10

    and so on
     
  12. 1066vik

    1066vik Supporter Supporter

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    I use a piece of reflectix (foil/buble/foil insulation -- very similar to the windshield reflectors mentioned above) under my bag, so your klymit pad should work fine - but I tend to sleep warm. I've heard yoga mats work pretty well, too, but they're heavy-ish if you're packing in any distance.
    A buddy of mine used to sling a heat sheet nd poncho liner under his hammock as an underquilt with good results into the low 30's/high 20's.
    the important thing about an underquilt is getting it snug at top, bottom, and along the sides, to keep the wind out.
     
  13. Kelly W

    Kelly W Love the Axe Supporter

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    Being a hammock camper if I knew it was going to be in the 40's, I'd just make sure I had a decent bag with me. I often will sleep on my bag and cover with a wool blanket. I worry about the teens and 20's. Have only used under quilts on really cold/rare occasion. I do shimmy out of my day cloths and put on dry thermals and socks before I go nighty night. I also have a mink hat I fashioned to keep my noggin and face warm while I dream.
     
  14. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    The aspect of having insulation outside of the hammock is huge. It made me a believer the first time I tried it with a DIY underquilt I put together.
     
  15. cstrickland

    cstrickland Scout

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    How far off is this trip ?? I would suggest you set up your rig in your back yard or even the garage ( leave the door partially open ) and try all the different configurations you have. If you aint comfortable in the backyard or garage with your set up you can always just go in the house. You will then have a better feel for what your tolerance is , and how much more insulation you will need. you can then plan an alternative camp method if you still want to go , but are not comfortable in your set up at night.

    I have slept in the backyard and garage a few times in the winter to test my systems.
     
  16. PLackey

    PLackey Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    0 degree bag? Yeah you will be fine.
     
  17. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    Your sleeping bag is of limited use in the cold as far as insulating the bottom side of you in a hammock due to your own weight compressing the loft. A synthetic bag will compact less than a down bag, but at some temperature point specific to your metabolism, it will be cold. You need something inside or outside to add loft. The Klymit mattress will only help a little. but remember, in a hammock, because you're not laying on a flat surface (I don't mean you aren't laying flat parallel to the ground), you will experience cooling around your shoulders, where the hammock wraps around you. you need insulation there as well, and the air mattress is not wide enough to do so. A foam pad with wings on it (see Speer Pad Extender) will help. An underquilt would be even better.
     
  18. riverjoe

    riverjoe Supporter Supporter

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    Definitely try getting in your sleeping bag and then in your hammock if you plan on getting inside your bag . Not the easiest task . Easiest way is to get in your bag standing up and then flop in like a carp .
    If you have an under quilt as was said you don’t need that much over quilt .
    I love the freedom
    of sleeping under an over quilt rather then a sleeping bag .
     
  19. sweet trav

    sweet trav Guide

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    Im also bringing an or bivy for the ground just in case...but I am going to try rigging something up with a wool blanket inside a tarp maybe on the underside/outside of the hammock.

    Thanks for all the info and ideas...I appreciate it all! :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
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  20. CamoDeafie82

    CamoDeafie82 Guide

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    Tarp clips, like those with the alligator toothed mating surfaces, can be a boon for making quick UQs... what you could try to do.... depends on how wide the wool blanket is.. fold in half, then put a wind blocking piece of fabric or say, a poncho, or similar, on the outermost side, with the wool blanket between hammock and wind block... using tarp clips to hold it all together, you can lash the unit to the hammock suspension, or to its own tree hugger sets and such. With the tarp clips, you can tailor where the attachments are, and fold the excess inwards to make bit more warmth at the ends.
     
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  21. beacon

    beacon Simul justus et peccator Supporter Bushclass I

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    I've been quite comfortable with a 20-degree bag and a z-lite pad, down to about 30F.
     
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  22. bikerector

    bikerector Tracker

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    I used a modular sleep system bivvy this week in about 50 degree and wind with just the bivvy and heavier bag (40 deg I think) with just undies and PJ's , no shirt or socks. The bivvy made a big difference in the wind but I was pretty comfortable. Using the green sleeping bag and some clothes I'm fairly certain I could easily handle freezing temps if the wind wasn't too bad and I put a hat and good socks on.

    I run warm though.
     
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  23. DuctTape

    DuctTape Scout

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    ^This. I use ccf exclusively in my hammock during the winter. Down to minus 22*F, needed about an inch of ccf. I use UQs in the summer.
     
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  24. beacon

    beacon Simul justus et peccator Supporter Bushclass I

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    I should mention that I get cold kinda easily.

    I've found that a diagonal lay has allowed me to remain on the pad, and completely avoid this ^^^ "cold shoulders" experience.

    I do have an Arrowhead Equipment Jarbidge UQ, but my kids always seem to end up with it somehow, so I can't speak to its performance at all.
     
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  25. xrayit

    xrayit Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Double layer hammock with the zero degree under quilt, over quilt and a tarp with doors I can go down to around 10 to 15 degrees before it gets uncomfortable.
     
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  26. bikerector

    bikerector Tracker

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    I just remembered a thought I had from my camping trip last week. My hammock has a separate bugnet and a little space between the hammock and the net. I think one could pretty easily slip a basic sleeping bag between the bug net and hammock for a cheap way to insulate your underside. Probably not as effective as an underquilt, but if you're like me and have a handful of sleeping bags, including the $20 dealy from Walmart, you could try out the setup without spending any extra money.
     
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  27. Scotchmon

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    Same here.
     
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  28. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Supporter Supporter

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    get yourself two blue mats from walmart. cut some shoulder wings and use duct tape to add wings to yer main mat. should keep the mat in place in the hammock. wool blanket on top of that with edges hanging outside. totally unzip yer bag and use it as a quilt ...
     
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  29. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Supporter Supporter

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    and when you can afford it, get yourself a war bonnet ridge runner or similar, with the sleeping pad pocket. slide yer pad in the pocket and yer ready to sleep under whatever cover you desire ...
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019 at 10:40 AM
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  30. Foilist

    Foilist Guide

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    Yeah, I don't get the overquilt thing. I just unzip my sleeping bag.
     
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  31. PAcanis

    PAcanis Supporter Supporter

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    Good thread. It runs parallel with my recent thread on ground cover and keeping warm. Right down to the approximate temp and a lot of the suggestions. Good to take it all in.

    I see some things being mentioned here that I just happened to run into on YT when looking for a decent single tree hang video. Not sure why it came up, but it did. It was a video by you know who talking about "the common man's" way to keep warm on a budget and with easy to tote items.
    The close cell foam exercise mat being one item and Reflectix being the other. First the foam, then the insulation. Then you can put your sleeping bag or wool blanket on top of those two layers.

    That's what I'm going to try. Then if I add my poncho liner as a makeshift UQ things can only improve.
     
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  32. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    I can't speak to using the sleeping bag, but I have a 0 degree underquilt and 0 degree top quilt, and as a really cold sleeper, it was just fine in 36 degree overnight (with layers).
     
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  33. Ragman

    Ragman Supporter Supporter

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    I have limited experience hammock camping but I would want an underquilt with anything under 50 degrees.
    That being said you should by able to get away with it using your air mattress, everyone's different, I sleep hot but chill easily.
     
  34. Foilist

    Foilist Guide

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    I personally need bottom insulation for anything under 65 degrees.
     
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  35. ParadigmShift

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    When I was first setting up, I thought the same. Unfortunately after a particularly chilly weekend, I noticed the zipper from my bag dragged against the fabric of my hammock, ripping it. That's the only reason I advocate for a "top quilt" (aka, sleeping bag with the zippers cut off), to protect against damage. Otherwise, fill your boots!

    I have a DIY top quilt and underquilt (summer rig) made from the Costco down throws. When the temps drop near freezing (fall/winter rig), I toss the top quilt into the under quilt as a booster to plug any air gaps beneath my body. This is where my big sleeping bag comes in. I unzip it, and use it as the top quilt. I've had this tested successfully down to 0C/32F. When temps are that chilly, you can leave the bugnet behind (you're layered heavily anyway), and use a "shemagh" (head scarf) to keep all but your eyes and nose covered. Also, grab a cheap neck pillow from the nearest bargain store. They're minimally invasive, comfy as hell, and stay in place (unlike every other half-inflated pillow). Anything LESS than your body temp, risks feeling cold (and a really bad night's sleep), so maybe take the klymit pad (half-inflated) just in case. They're finicky to keep in place, but it's better than nothing. (and you've got a decent backup if you have to "go to ground".)

    Also, sleep socks. The fuzziest pair you have; not for slogging about; sleep only. Game-changer. (and they works as mitts should your feet not need the assist).
     
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  36. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Supporter Supporter

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    the top quilt's advantage is one of size; packs so much smaller than a bag ...
     
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  37. Red Wing

    Red Wing Guide

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    Nah buddy, someone mentioned a windshield reflector. That's your best cheapest option.

    Your bag means nothin in a hammock. I've spent many nights before hammock forums was around freezing in my 0 degree synthetic bag in the 30s to 50s.

    A roll of redlectix is about 18.00 here for 25'. A car windshield reflector can be had for 5 to 10 bucks. You will not regret it.
     
  38. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter

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    THIS
     

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