It can be frustrating

Discussion in 'Archery' started by Brown Beard, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. Brown Beard

    Brown Beard Tracker

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    Shooting a recurve bow can be real frustrating for me. I like to shoot instinctively and it's been two months since I let some arrows loose. But god dang can it be frustrating at times. It's almost like my body seems to forget how to shoot a bow after I just shot an arrow. This has always been a problem for me to be honest. The bow I'm using is a Ben Pearson 48# draw weight and it could very well be that the bow weight is to strong for me at this moment. I've been thinking about purchasing the SAS Snake Adult Recurve in 20# draw weight. So I can practice on my form. I'm not really sure if that will help or not but it's worth a try I guess.
     
  2. Zunga

    Zunga Guide

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    I've only played with archery. But I permantly injured my index finger on my draw hand. It doesn't go straight and has very little strength. Messed up both archery and trigger pull. I've also found with sling shot my skills go to nothing without constant practice. Rifle to a lesser degree! I used to spend a lot time training in the martial arts. Perhaps find or make a tool to simulate draw. Keep the muscle memory if nothing else.
    Cheers
    Jim
     
  3. Dusty Tom

    Dusty Tom Tracker

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    I bet the lower weight 20# bow will help form wise. At the least you will be able to shoot a lot with out wearing out or hurting your joints and muscles. When I start back at it this Spring I'll be using 35# limbs. Normally I use 45#. I noticed the SAS Snake is ambidextrous, that's pretty cool.
     
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  4. PAcanis

    PAcanis Supporter Supporter

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    Heck. I haven't picked up my Olympic Recurve in a year. Not looking forward to it next time (this year).
    But you're still shooting :)
     
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  5. Duncsquatch

    Duncsquatch Supporter Supporter

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    I find I do ok even if I haven't picked up the bow in a while. Here are some questions to give me a better picture of what you are dealing with:
    1. How long have you been shooting?
    2. What is your draw length, height and build? How long is your bow?
    3. By instinctive do you mean just stare at target and let it fly to let your subconscious memory of the correct sight picture take over? Or do you mean gap shooting without sights. (FYI-I am more of a Gap Shooter on longer shots but instinctive on closer shots...)
    4. What release? One over, two under or three under? Follow through?
    5. Do you stand erect or hunched when you shoot? * Do you cant the bow or shoot more straight.
    6. What do your feet do when shooting?
    7. How do you grip your bow?* (this one is the thing that I struggled with the longest)
    8. When done with a long day of shooting what part is sore?*

    LOL guess that is all I need to know...That got more detailed than intended. *= stuff I bet is the cause.
    PS- I dont think it is the bow weight.
     
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  6. mjh

    mjh Supporter Supporter

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    Shooting hunting weight recurves and longbows is a year round kind of thing if you want to be consistently accurate. While I might not shoot every week in the colder months I do shot some every month of the year. I do a weekly indoor league Jan. to March. I've got bows from 36lbs to 55lbs. I do shoot the light weight bows in the winter and start shooting higher weights in the spring through summer and into hunting seasons.

    You could try some of the archery form band style exercisers, try 3Rivers Archery or Lancaster Archery I bet they have them.

    Also check to make sure your arrows are properly spined for the bow and draw length you area shooting.
     
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  7. Cavemanrob

    Cavemanrob Supporter Supporter

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    The lower poundage bow will help, if you can transfer that form over to the higher weight bow. My 45# recurve is my light practice bow, and my 60# longbow is my heavy bow. It took a long time to get decent form down with the 45# bow before I could accurately shoot the 60# bow.

    have someone record you shooting 6 shots, see if your form is good and consistent, and make sure that elbow is high enough, that's the number one issue for most people is not lifting that elbow up high enough on their drawing arm.

    And most importantly, keep shooting and having fun. I'm pretty sure archery is akin to therapy, just a lot cheaper.
     
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  8. Brown Beard

    Brown Beard Tracker

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    1. I've been shooting for a couple years now
    2. My draw length is 28", I'm 6' and I have a broad build with extra poundage.
    3. I mean I focus on the center of the target, draw, anchor, loose. All without taking my eyes off the target, like throwing a baseball.
    4. Two under
    5. kinda hunched
    6. my feet are generally shoulder width apart and stay stationary when shooting
    7. I grip my bow lightly
    8. my hands and shoulders
     
  9. gargoyle

    gargoyle Scout

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    Conditioning and muscle memory are key. Train with technique until you achieve the physical side. Don't fret that your arrow isn't perfect in the 10 ring. I had a friend who re-did everything all the time. New strings, new arrows , new, new, new..almost weekly.
    Get an elastic band and stretch that to increase strength. Focus on your back muscles. Do some push ups and pull ups to increase strength. Also warm up and cool down after practice. Stretch before and after shooting. Strength and flexibility go hand in hand.
    Number your arrows. They each are different, a little. I don't care if they are store bought or hand made, they all fly slightly different. You'll soon see that #1 may fly left an inch or two, while #3 has a drop, regardless of your consistent, focused technique. I used a fine tip magic marker and after I learned each arrows "personality", I really increased my accuracy.
    Start close to the target and train on your pull.
    Check your bow, or have a pro shop check it for any potential damage? A hairline crack can send the arrow off strangely.
    Weather and humidity can change how the bow works.
    Hand strength. You may need to use a release.?
    RELAX- you will never shoot good when you over think the process. Get comfortable.

    PS Buck Fever is uncontrollable.. This is where technique and muscle memory will win out. Hopefully.
     
  10. arleigh

    arleigh Guide

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    It's why I like my compound bows .
     
  11. Duncsquatch

    Duncsquatch Supporter Supporter

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    Sounds like you need to work on back tension and what archers call a collapse. I am not able to explain it so well as show it in person. But basically a collapse is when you release tension by releasing the string you body "collapses" or looses rigidity and causes unpredictable shooting. Saxon Pope overemphasizes this in his writtings on how to shoot. He says the body should be as rigid as possible for a solid shooting foundation. Maybe not as rigid as you possibly can as that would cause other problems but the idea is sound.

    The muscles in your back should be sore that go laterally between/near your shoulder blades if using proper back tension. Once I learned to use these muscles more in my shooting I could shoot longer and hold my heavy poundage bow and full draw for much longer before starting to shake. Look up some videos on youtube about back tension and collapse and there are a lot of teachings on this subject.


    Also if you are missing left and right alternatively for me the problem was grip. If I used my thumb too much I would miss left if I used my top two fingers too much I would miss right. Even though I wasn't squeezing hard with either. Balance.

    PS for a six foot guy who is broad you will probably gain an inch in draw length if you are collapsing and if you fix it. I am 5'11" and some change and broad and I draw 29" while not having unusually long arms.
     
  12. Brown Beard

    Brown Beard Tracker

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    So I looked up back tensioning and finally found a vid that made sense. I’ve been working on it and my posture is improving a little but arrows are all over the place still. Ugh
     
  13. gila_dog

    gila_dog Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    When I've had problems like that it turned out I was over thinking the shot. Shoot 2 or 3 nice shots, then all over the place. For me shooting instinctively means just focusing on the little spot on the target, and then raising, drawing and shooting quickly without any real aiming. My brain and body know how to shoot accurately. But if I start thinking about the technicalities or trying different things, thinking about the anchor point, aiming, using certain muscles, release, whatever, I mess up the shot. I just have to get my head into the shot, and not the shooting.
    I used to play basketball and for me shooting a bow, and shooting a basketball, are very similar mental and physical challenges.
     
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  14. Youcantreadinthedark

    Youcantreadinthedark Chaotic Neutral. Supporter Bushclass I

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    Not to hike your hike, but doing yoga really, really helps.
     
  15. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    I have gotten pretty good and then gotten lousy, and I attribute it to muscle memory. Every season, I get overall better.... each year, it takes less time to get 'good enough' at a certain range, and then work on extending it, kind of a two steps forward, once step back thing. There are individual days though, where I can call the shots on the spots on my target and put an arrow where I want it... then there are other days when I can't get better than a 2" wide x 12" high "group", sometimes on consecutive days. It is indeed frustrating.

    But keep at it.

    If you wanted to pull a trigger and hit something without much work, you can always go back to gun hunting. or a compound.
     

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