Knife Sharpening

Discussion in 'Florida' started by Luzster, Jul 6, 2017.

  1. Luzster

    Luzster Of course your opinion matters, just not to me... Supporter

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    Evening everyone. First things first, I suck at it. Not like totally suck at it, but suck at it nonetheless. I have a grinding wheel, belt sander, file, stones and leather. I've watched about every video there is online. I get my knives sharp enough to function, but not as sharp as I want. I want a knife that will cut something just by me thinking about cutting it. I want a razor to look at my knife/ax and say 'damn that's sharp'. I want a knife so sharp it can slice water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen..... I think y'all get it.

    Anyways, if there is anyone in the Pensacola area, that would be able to, want to, spend some time to teach/instruct/give a tip or 40, I would GREATLY appreciate it!! Might be able to work a trade as well. Anyone up for it?!!?!??!?!!? ANYONE?!?!?!?
     
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  2. whtshdwwz

    whtshdwwz Supporter Supporter

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    Hit garage sales, estate sales and flea markets and buy some old kitchen knives to just practice on....repetition and patience is all you need.....you will get there.
     
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  3. Skeptiksks

    Skeptiksks Green Haired Weirdo Supporter

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    Time and a light touch help a lot. Also, multiple grits. Have you tried sandpaper and a mouse pad? Try to match the angle of the edge and then go a hair steeper and keep it there, that way will pretty much keep it right where you want it. Just my experience
     
  4. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

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    I practiced on my .79 bait knife
    Keep practicing
     
  5. Luzster

    Luzster Of course your opinion matters, just not to me... Supporter

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    HA! Patience? What the hell is that??? :)
     
  6. Ranger99

    Ranger99 Tracker

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    practice as some ^ ^ ^have posted. old klunkers to practice with as some ^ ^ ^ have posted.
    if you were near here i'd gladly take the time to show you.
    a fwiw - some knives (i have a lot) just aren't re-sharpening friendly. the 2 benchmades i
    have come to mind. they hold an edge great, but they're way too hard to easily re-sharpen,
    hence, they don't get carried or used a lot like some others i have.
    ( a sub-fwiw to this one^ ^ ^ - professional meat cutters use "cheap" easily re-sharpenable
    knives every day all day long to make a living with )
    another fwiw - some folks are never able to get down the process of using a common whetstone
    to sharpen a knife. that's just the way it is, no shame in it. i've showed a friend a hundred times, we've
    bought the wheel kits, sharpening guides, etc. and he still just cannot do a satisfactory job of
    putting an edge on a knife. he can shoot pretty good, he's an exceptional caster when fishing,
    and can cook about as good as i can, and is just a pretty good ol' boy. sharpening ? not at all.
    one more fwiw - i didn't get it down overnight, and probably ruined some pretty fair knives
    learning. it's just fate that i picked it up. if after all the practice etc. and you can't get it down,
    buy you one of those replaceable edge knives that have become so popular and a bunch of
    extra replacement blades and don't look back. i would if i thought i needed one, and everyone
    else could suck lemons. good luck to you
     
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  7. DomC

    DomC Retired Old Scrub Stomper Supporter

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    Only time and practice will tell if you ever get good. Muscle memory comes with time. Understanding grind angles and types of grinds need to be understood. Characteristics of different steels add to the mix. Nothing of value is easily attained. I've been sharpening my knives since the sixties and I still learn new things, but I can get my knives sharp enough to get the job done. One bit of advice...sharpen once, strop a lot to maintain your edge... Keep plugging and Good luck!

    Dom
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2017
  8. Mannlicher

    Mannlicher Guide

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    most of my life, I sharpened by hand, using an old Norton Oil Stone set. For the past 10 years or so, I have been using an EdgePro Apex set. Lets you select the bevel with great accuracy, and really gives a sharp, long lasting edge.
     
  9. feellnfroggy

    feellnfroggy Guide

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    The knives from box stores with cheap steel are impossible to sharpen and worse to learn on. Look for old "rusty!" kitchen knives/butcher knives. The better steel is more forgiving and sharpens/holds an edge better. Great for learning and cheap as dirt. A good thick piece of leather, with some walmart 3m automotive multipack sandpaper is what you need. It comes with 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500 grits, and your knives will not only shave you when finished, but skin you every chance you get.

    MOST IMPORTANTLY- practice consistentcy with your hold. Whatever angle you choose, stick with it always. And using the sandpaper to touch up factory bevels is the most effective, then once good at it, you can move up to sharpening blanks.
     
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