Learning About Camping Clothes/Layers

Discussion in 'Clothing' started by Syntria, Dec 5, 2017 at 8:06 PM.

  1. Syntria

    Syntria Supporter Supporter

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    Hey everyone,

    I plan to go through and read most peoples threads. I'm sure there are also resources I can look up. My recent camping trip, I only wore a regular tshirt, sweater, running jacket and nearly froze to death. I went to Goodwill today and here are some finds. They don't do much for my figure but seem like good camping clothes.

    IMG_20171205_190316_305.jpg

    Are there any golden rules of camping clothes I should know about?
     
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  2. MHW

    MHW Tracker

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    Something that the wind won't blow through.
    Long underwear on the bottom--makes an unbelieveable difference.
     
  3. Haggis

    Haggis Supporter Supporter

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    All layering was not created equal ,,,
     
  4. Riverpirate

    Riverpirate Supporter Supporter

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  5. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    it's all about layers. something close to skin to wick moisture away, insulating layers and a weather protection layer to keep elements of you like rain, wind, snow ect.
     
  6. wizard

    wizard Guide

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    Wool, loose fitting and a windproof outer shell. Synthetics like fleece are also good but wool is more comfortable at a wider range of temperatures. Do not wear clothing tight, under layers can be snug but layers after that should be more free fitting. That helps trap air for insulation and also breathes better during activities.

    A good shell that is windproof is nice to have and one that is waterproof/breathable is even better. A good shell that won't break the bank is a Marmot PreCip, they make them in women's sizing and they are light,, wind/waterproof and breathable to a point. A good place to pick up deals on outdoor clothing is Sierra Trading Post, sign up for their emails and they always offer an additional discount of around 25% on top of the already low pricing. Good place for deals.

    Goodwill is always a great place to pick up clothing, prices are really cheap for often new items. Look for deals on wool sweaters and shell jackets, often amazing deals. The goodies you already picked up look great and should help stay warm. While we desert dwellers like cotton in warmer weather, it is a hazard in colder/wetter seasons. Jeans are not a good choice, if they get wet, they stay wet. Find some good pants at Sierra Trading or REI, there are lots of cut for women styles in fabrics that are more outdoors comfortable.

    Have fun, stay safe and learn as much as possible in a safe environment before heading off into the outback :)
     
  7. jeremyctry

    jeremyctry Outdoorsman Supporter Bushclass I

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    layers, environment, activities
    What keeps you warm at home, will keep you warm at camp. You want a wind/rainproof outer shell and a good base layer. Fleece is a good lightweight option that still breathes making it good for hiking and being active. Avoid denim and other similar heavy materials, they take up a lot of space, they are heavy, and if they get wet will get heavier and take longer to dry. There are a lot of opinions and facts on this site, but at the end of the day it all boils down to personal preference. 6 months from now you may decide you want to go all traditional and invest in waxed canvas and leather, or you may decide you want to invest in ultralight gear. I mix and match, some of my kit is traditional, some is mil-spec, and some is Ultralight. I decide what items to carry based on the activities I have planned. Budget will be a deciding factor so do the best you can with what you have. But clothing wise, I would invest in a pair of quick dry zip off hiking pants, a couple of quick dry under armor type shirts, a set of summer weight bdu pants, and a bdu top. The quick dry stuff can get expensive so if you want to save money I suggest picking up a couple sets of used BDUs/ACUs or what have you, at your local Military surplus shop they are lighter weight, and will dry more quickly than denim. Wool hiking socks do not skimp on these get the good ones they maybe expensive but your feet will thank you.
     
  8. CHREBA

    CHREBA Scout

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    Stay away from cotton !!! Here's my cold weather line up . Polypropylene thermals , a wool sweater and heavy fleece outer jacket or down sweater . More often than not heavy fleece gets the nod for me . Next comes the all important wind layer , For me I like a poncho . My personal choice is made of rip stop nylon . Why you ask ? Because it covers 95% of my body and the right one will also cover your pack . A wet pack is a heavier pack . I've never had one stay completely dry with just a pack cover . A poncho is easily vented also to prevent getting clammy underneath . Sweat equals danger " Avoid moister holding cotton " . The right fit as mentioned is very important . Your body will heat up the space between closer NOT TIGHT fitting layers easily when active . If you get too warm remove a layer or vent - open the sides of poncho until satisfied . I'm going to assume your of " Average " height for a woman ? So a standard poncho will cover you pretty well even with a pack . And all bit the poncho can be had very inexpensively at a thrift store . I have a wool sweater I purchased for a $3 . It's the ugliest heaviest sweater I've ever seen . 100% Alpaca hand stiched in Nepal . It's called a mountain sweater . Nice tight weave and as colorful as all the flags you see on those base camp pictures combined lol . But by far the warmest sweater I've ever owned . Great for brush beating , the wife hates it lol .
    15125738490832033122637.jpg
    Don't know why it posted upside down . But here's another thrift store sweater made in Equator . Cost me a couple bucks at most . Super thick and warm 100% wool as well .
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017 at 10:29 AM
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  9. ClutteredShop

    ClutteredShop Guide

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    Several people have mentioned the importance of layers, but maybe we should review WHY layering is important.

    1. A pound of insulation has more insulating power if it is in two garments rather then in just one. This is because the air layer between the clothing layers also has insulating power, and it's free.

    2. You can adjust your degree of insulating by shedding or adding layers. This is important, because if you dress warmly for the early morning and keep all those layers on, you might work up a sweat from exertion when the day warms up, wetting the inner layer and thus reducing its insulating power. Then, as the day cools off again, that sweaty clothing will be cold and clammy on your skin.

    3. Functional difference: there's no sense in wearing that waterproof, windproof outer layer if it's not a watery, windy day.

    4. High fashion: you don't want to be seen in mossy-oak camo when the hippest hipsters are in lumberjack plaid. ;)
    (Oh, wait...if you're in camo, no one will see you anyhow)
     
  10. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    I like shopping at the thrift stores too. 90% of my wardrobe came from there. Wool is what I really like to find, like finding treasure. That green shirt with buttons you have looks like a army surplus wool shirt only with short sleeves. Those are nice heavy wool shirts.
     
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  11. Terasec

    Terasec Scout

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    not familiar with TX heat for camping
    but in general, layers should be removeable, less layers when hiking, moving about, then add a layer when you stop,
    also in pics looks like those are good for warmth but not an outer shell to protect you from the elements(wind/rain)
     
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  12. pfluggy

    pfluggy Tracker

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    If you know how to so you can buy old wool blankets and make vest shirt coat etc. from them. Other than that it’s pretty well covered in the above
     
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  13. pfluggy

    pfluggy Tracker

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    Always a good idea to have a wool blanket can wrap up by fire and stay warm at night. If it has a slit cut in it it’s a poncho also
     
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  14. Gramp Camp

    Gramp Camp Supporter Supporter

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    Merino wool next to the skin, heavier wool layers on top. No cotton!!
     
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  15. Scotchmon

    Scotchmon Supporter Supporter

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    ^^^ This. If looking at synthetics(fleece), beware that not all fleece is created equal. Try to find those with a tighter weave. A good quick way to inspect them is to hold them up to a light source and see how much light passes through.
    You may also want to check out shell offerings by FroggToggs. Inexpensive, and the Tyvek material breathes well. A lot of bang for the buck.
     
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  16. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Right now you are dealing with colder weather, but do not forget that hot weather will come.

    Cotton works well in much of Texas due to the dry heat. A long sleeve cotton work shirt and jeans will give both evaporative cooling and sun protection.

    For the cold weather, wool is a good choice. I have wool pants and a wool sweater. With thermal underware and a wind proof jacket, they work well in our winters. I do not like the synthetic stuff nearly as much, it is much more vulnerable to wear and easily damaged by fire and sparks.

    Also, if you will look up " Palmer Furnace" you will find a useful way to quickly warm up using a candle and a poncho or heavy grade trash bag.

    Stocking cap for cold weather, a brimmed hat (Western, Aussie or other) for Texas summer.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017 at 12:28 PM
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  17. SmilinJoe

    SmilinJoe Supporter Supporter

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    All great advice above. If I may suggest too, keep a set of sleeping clothes and wool socks just for sleeping. I usually use merino wool long underwear, wool socks and a skull cap in my sleeping bag and will often have to vent cause I'm too hot but I'm a hot blooded person anyway. It may take a bit but searching thrift stores and goodwill pays off. Best of luck on your search.
     
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  18. Chris L

    Chris L Tracker

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    It’s an interesting question and it’s one of those situations where doing the wrong thing can get you in trouble or you may be perfectly fine. As others said wool or synthetics or both but always layering and take off layers so you don’t sweat. I know many people wear BDU style 50/50 pants and seemingly if it is good enough for the military it’s good enough. Most hikers seem to favor synthetics for weight.
     
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  19. Duncsquatch

    Duncsquatch Supporter Supporter

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    1st layer wicking or scent resistant or both,
    2nd layer Fuzzyness for loft or insulation
    3rd thorn and brush and water protection.

    ways to ventilate are also awesome when you have periods of higher activity so you don't sweat too much. SO for that reason I avoid pullovers/sweaters and gravitate towards zippered garments.
     
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  20. Syntria

    Syntria Supporter Supporter

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    Could the 1st layer be made of active ware materials? Same stuff you might run in/work out in if it isn't cotton?
    How does cashmere work for the 2nd layer? I just got a really cozy Cashmere shirt (one of the long sleeve green ones shown above).
    3rd - This is what I'm defiantly lacking at this stage and might have to get.

    I only have some cargo pants, what I wore in the video. Just checked the material. 100% cotton.

    Thanks for the breakdown. I'll go through the clothes I already have and see what falls into all these categories.
     
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  21. Syntria

    Syntria Supporter Supporter

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    I'm so happy I bought two pairs of wool socks before this first trip. I ended up wearing a pair of them on my hands in the night.
     
  22. Syntria

    Syntria Supporter Supporter

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    I have rips on my couch/clothes I still haven't tried to fix. I fail as a girl in this regard but it is a skill I need to pick up (sitching). Great idea.
     
  23. Syntria

    Syntria Supporter Supporter

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    I had a lot of trouble finding wool items but I also don't think I know what it feels like/what to look for. I did find a nice cashmere shirt. I'll look up some more stuff about fleece and wool so I will know what to look for on my next trip.

    2017-12-06 11.50.09.jpg
     
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  24. snapper

    snapper Guide

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    If you like cargo pants you might want to check out some of the nylon cargo pants; even zip-offs which make them a bit more versatile when the weather gets warmer. They can be expensive if you pay full price but look in catalogs like the Sierra Trading Post or continue looking through the bins at your local Goodwill. Nylon pants made by North Face, LL Bean and others will work well as an outer layer during the colder windier months; especially with a nice long underwear bottom beneath them.

    You mentioned your first layer; my guess is as long as it's not cotton, you should be OK. The problem with cotton is that it retains moisture, making your skin damp and clammy. When you're active you might not notice it but once you stop, especially on a cold day, you will feel very cold indeed. If you can find some Under Armor or off-brand polypro tops & bottoms you should be fine. Personally I'm not a fan of Under Armor because I feel shrink wrapped in it but lots of people like it so as they say, your mileage may vary.

    I think that's all for the moment. Congrats to you for taking this on and getting yourself ready for the great outdoors you won't regret it.

    Take care and until next time....be well.

    snapper
     
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  25. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Cashmere works well for an insulating layer, but that sweater looks too thin and loosely woven to provide much warmth. For your mid layer insulation, loft is what traps warm air and keeps your skin warm. This means that you want something that is either thick or fluffy. As long as it isn't cotton, it will keep you warm provided you cover it with a shell to keep the heat in.

    People use the term micro-climate and that's a good description of what you're trying to accomplish. If you can trap air next to your skin, your body will heat it up to 70+ degrees and you'll be comfortable. If there is no wind, a fluffy garment can keep you warm on its own, but even a light breeze will rob that pre-heated air from you without a windproof layer.
     
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  26. Riverpirate

    Riverpirate Supporter Supporter

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    Wool, I repeat....lol
     
  27. Duncsquatch

    Duncsquatch Supporter Supporter

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    Active wear counts as wicking, poly products dont absorb water much. I usually wear a poly shirt or merino wool for this layer. As you said anything but cotton (unless it is the summer)

    I live in the dry side of washington so the cotton pants are not as big of a problem for me. But in general they are to be avoided if it is cold enough out to hurt you of you spend extended time soaked.

    I dont know anything about cashmere though.
     
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  28. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Cashmere makes an excellent mid layer and even makes a good baselayer if it gets really really cold
    Just be aware that there are a lot of counterfeit knock-offs out there that are not real Cashmere so be careful with the S/H stuff
     
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  29. pfluggy

    pfluggy Tracker

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    Learn how to make a supper shelter find your self in trouble it could come in handy
    I can freeze my hands till they fall off but cold feet and I’m done
     
  30. CharClothed

    CharClothed Supporter Supporter

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    If it's wool, get it. Even if it's ugly. You don't need to look fashionable in the woods. You need to be warm.
     
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  31. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    Read the information here
    http://ciehub.info/clothing/CW/PCU.html

    All the information about layering and how much clothing is needed is condensed there
    Interesting video too, and not an ounce of wool or down in the whole system, using down for cold weather clothing would be much lighter so don't take it as gospel for civilian use That said I use several of the items and find they mix and match well with most of my down gear but I still use my M-65 Fishtail too because it is robust as an intermediate shell.
    Keep the skin dry and keep the wind off; everything else is in-between.
    How cold do you need to dress for? How cold do you want to be able to survive in if just wearing your clothing? Will you be using your clothing to sleep in?
    This is a Bushcraft site and for some member wool is almost a religion and for some purposes it is still the best, even I still own and use woollen trousers and a few pull-overs, I don't wear wool against my skin For me polyester and polypropylene work better, everybody is different
    If you can still find an M-65 Fishtail tho I suggest you buy it with the button in liner
     
  32. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    all seasons I want base layers that are thin and readily move moisture- the newer lightweight synthetic grids are probably the best in this category, for colder weather or longer trips- a merino/syn blend ~ 65:35 is what I've found to work best- the benefits of wool (warmth, non-smelling) with better drying and better durability

    an outer layer that can handle wind/precip- I prefer a windshirt because it can breathe, but still bloc wind and shed light to moderate precip- unlike any waterproof layer, a waterproof layer only when it's raining hard

    an insulating layer when stopped- synthetic in wetter environments, down in drier environments

    in colder weather a mid-layer- fleece fills this role pretty well and can even be hand rung out if necessary
     
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  33. sons of scotland

    sons of scotland Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    on your next thrift store stop go to the mens sweater section and i can guarentee you will find all the wool sweaters you will need, may not look pretty but it will keep you warm. and some of my wool sweaters i cut the sleeves off to make vests out of, great to keep your core warm but good for mobility as well.
     
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