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Leather work

Discussion in 'Self-made Gear' started by Timberdogz, May 19, 2017.

  1. Timberdogz

    Timberdogz Supporter Supporter

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    IMG_0928.JPG So after reading posts here and looking at all the how to's on YouTube, I started looking around for leather and leather working tools. I had a couple repair projects in mind and thought maybe I can do them myself. Then I'm at a local farmers market and there is a guy doing leather repairs. I end up making a deal with the guy and he repairs the snap on my Gransfors ax sheath, replaces the broken strap on my Kabar Sheath, and makes me a new sheath for my carpenters ax.... $55! Not bad!
     
  2. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter

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    Nice!
    Not to be "that guy", but I have to say that for what you paid him you could have bought most, if not all, of the supplies needed to do it yourself and be left with the tools and experience gained from the process.

    Aw hell, I'm that guy, aren't I.
    Sorry.
     
    Broke, SmilinJoe, pab1 and 2 others like this.
  3. pab1

    pab1 Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    I have to agree with "That Guy" but its good that you'll get use out of your damaged gear again. You're right though, that's not a bad price for him to charge for the time and materials involved. Making your own leather goods makes you understand quickly why leather products are so expensive. For the time alone involved in some of the sheaths and holsters I've made there's no way I could sell them for what many leather craftsman sell them for and make a profit. Making a single item is much more time consuming than mass production but it really makes you appreciate what goes into making a quality leather product.
     
    Timberdogz and gohammergo like this.

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