Log drive in Quebec, 1950s.....

Discussion in 'Media Forum' started by x39, Apr 21, 2019.

  1. x39

    x39 Hyperborean Supporter

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    Nice little film documenting pulp wood harvesting from the forest to the mill. Within the lifetime of many of us....

     
  2. Muskeg_Stomper

    Muskeg_Stomper Tiaga & Tundra Wanderer Supporter

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    Excellent film. Have to bet there were lots of injuries.
     
  3. x39

    x39 Hyperborean Supporter

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    You aren't kidding! One thing that stood out to me was the physicality of the work. When they were cutting, every single log was handled at least once by a man. Those guys must have been shoveling the chow aboard like nobody's business!
     
  4. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    I wonder how all those 4 foot pieces cut in the beginning got longer sitting there on the frozen lake. :1:I wish they still made wool coats with patterns like that.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2019
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  5. Guillaume Longval

    Guillaume Longval Friction Fire Addict

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    its kind of weird to listen to that in english...

    thanks for the link!

    seems to be in upper laurentides, although some names must have changed. maybe 100 miles from where my grandfather was guide in the same years.
     
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  6. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue —- Roughian #7 -— --- Graybeard -— Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I enjoy that kind of video, thanks!
     
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  7. wvridgerunner

    wvridgerunner BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    Great video. My Dad and uncle cut pup wood in the mid 50’s using a tricycle front end Farmall tractor. Very dangerous on the hill sides of WV. They got a dollar for each debarked pine log. My dad laughs about my uncles lunch. It was a loaf of bread with thick sliced balogna between each slice every day. When weather was good they worked 7 days a week. Several of our neighbors died doing the same thing.
     
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  8. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue —- Roughian #7 -— --- Graybeard -— Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Great video. I wonder what the engine in the little boat was? I’ve never seen a bulldozer boat before either.

    This is quite a shelter.

    82993FDF-B555-46B3-A21A-4F8E097EB6A0.jpeg
     
  9. Paul Caruso

    Paul Caruso Being all that I am. Supporter

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    That’s a great video. They brought the logs to Buckingham Quebec, right across from Ottawa, it sounds like they came though Témiscamingue. Not that long ago on the Ottawa river they were dredging for those old logs from the log drive to sell for lumber.

    It is really neat to see the history of my hometown, and how Philemon Wright got it right.

    Now I know how Big Joe Mufferaw was able to kick so much butt.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2019
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  10. BradGad

    BradGad Supporter Supporter

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    Certainly cute and catchy.

    I grew up loving Western movies, but in recent years I have realized they are all premised on unstated genocide, and that really “bothers” (weak word) me.

    When I fly over the country, and see how 98% has been raped. I want to vomit and/or die.

    I honestly do get the appeal of this time, this work. But, now all the old forest is gone, and that is more than a crime, more than a shame.
     
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  11. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB 42 Supporter

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    That's where I grew up and spent my childhood bush time.
     
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  12. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB 42 Supporter

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    Stompin Tom
    Miscellaneous
    Big Joe Mufferaw
    Heave Hi Heave Hi Ho-the best man in Ottawa was Mufferaw Joe...Mufferaw Joe
    Big Joe Mufferaw paddled into Mattawa all the way from Ottawa in just one day-hey hey-
    On the river Ottawa the best man we ever saw was big Joe Mufferaw the old folks sayeeeh
    Come listen and I'll tell ya what the old folks say...
    Yeah they say big Joe had an old pet frog, bigger than a horse and he barked like a dog-
    And the only thing quicker than a train upon a track was big joe ridin on the bullfrog's back-
    Heave Hi Heave Hi Ho-the best man in Ottawa was Mufferaw Joeeeeh...Mufferaw Joe....
    Yeah they said big Joe used to get real wet from cuttin down timber and workin up a sweat
    And everyone'll tell ya around Carlton place the Mississippi dripped off of big Joe's face
    Hey Hi heave Hi ho ....the best...
    Now Joe had to portage from the Gatineau down to see a little girl he had in Kempville town
    He was back and forth so many times to see that gal the path he wore became the Rideau canal
    Heave Hi Heave Hi Ho-the best man in Ottawa...
    Play intro again:
    Big Joe Mufferaw paddled into Mattawa all the way from Ottawa in just one day, hey hey
    Etc
    Yeah they say big Joe put out a forest fire halfway between Renfrew and old Arnprior
    He was 50 Miles away down around Smith Falls when he drowned out the fire with 5 spit balls
    Hey hi Heave Hi Ho-the best man in Ottawa was Mufferaw Joe...
    Well he jumped in the Calabogie L. real fast & he swam both ways to catch a cross-eyed bass
    But he threw it on the ground & said "I can't eat that," So he covered it over with Mount St.Pat
    Hey Hi Heave hi ho-
    Yeah they say Big Joe drank a bucket of gin and he beat the livin tar out of 29 men-
    And High on the ceilin of a Pembroke Club there's 29 boot marks and they're signed"with love"
    Hey've Hi He hi ho...
    INTRO again
    Hey've hi he hi ho....
    Big Joe Mufferaw. Big Joe Mufferaw...End
     
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  13. TrespassersWilliam

    TrespassersWilliam Supporter Supporter

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    I am too old now to be handing out hasty judgements. Questions about questionable, seemingly inhuman behavior? Sure! ...but creation was subjected to futility in hope.

    The Coen Brothers have made it politically correct to enjoy Western tropes with SPLC-approved levels of self-hatred. See Buster Scruggs -- we might still be allowed to enjoy it. ;)
     
  14. Paul Caruso

    Paul Caruso Being all that I am. Supporter

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    Big Joe:
    upload_2019-4-22_7-24-6.jpeg
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Montferrand
     
  15. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    Great video, I grew up watching the annual log drives on the Kennebec river and my grand dad worked his way thru college summers in the 1920s as a payroll clerk in lumber camps.
     
  16. x39

    x39 Hyperborean Supporter

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    @Seacapt. , have you ever seen "From Stump to Ship" about logging downeast in the 1930s? The bridge over "Bad Little Falls" in Machias crosses the ruins of the old sawmill that was there, and the cribbing from the old docks where the ships were loaded with wood is still visible below the falls. Large vessels stopped coming up as far as Machias when the "Rim Rd." bridge was built in Machiasport. It's too low to even bring a small sail boat under. Used to be a draw bridge there.

     
  17. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    Great video,,, I’ll be watching it a few times...

    As in the video, my grandpa notched trees with an axe, then cut them down and bucked them with a chainsaw,,, limbed them with an axe too... A holdover custom from the days of the crosscut saw I’ve always reckoned...

    Grandpa and G-Uncle Martin logged with a crosscut saw in the late 20’s and early 30’s,,, axe and a crosscut saw,,, Grandpa said there where big White Oak trees their 6’ crosscut saw would just reach through in the center...
     
  18. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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  19. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    @x39. Thanks for interesting video, I haven't seen it before. As far a coastwise shipping goes my 2nd great uncle from Saugus ,Ma. contracted with central Maine farmers for hay which he sent by narrow gauge train down to Wiscasset where it was put aboard the overnight steamers down to Boston where he had contracts with Boston area police and fire department to supply hay for their horses.
     
  20. x39

    x39 Hyperborean Supporter

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    Your Great Uncle's hay business was no doubt another victim of modernization. Once gasoline driven vehicles became common and the economics became apparent, the day of the horse drew to a quick close. If you're ever down in Thomaston stop by the Owl's Head Transportation Museum. There's a horse drawn steam fire engine converted to gasoline engine propelled on display. A not uncommon conversion in that era.
     
  21. Duncsquatch

    Duncsquatch Heed the call. Supporter

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    those log sleds pulled by horse look a bit precarious... One slip and its no more work for meeee!
     
  22. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker LB 42 Supporter

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    @Paul Caruso
    I never knew the song was based on a real man! Thanks for that. Very cool.
     
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  23. gila_dog

    gila_dog Supporter Supporter

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    Wow! So how do they do it now? Do guys still dance on those slippery logs, put explosives below them on long sticks and then haul ass across the logs to get away in time? How is all that work done?
    I noticed that there weren't any old men doing that work.
     
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  24. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    It's all done by machine and hauled in trucks. Some train hauling but not a lot compared to trucks. River drives were mostly all done by the fifties. Those drives did a lot of damage to river ecosystems. Michigan rivers are still recovering from the massive sand loads. Even most of the laborers cutting pulpwood are sitting in processors now.
     
  25. x39

    x39 Hyperborean Supporter

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    It's all done with heavy machinery now. "Feller bunchers" cut, delimb, and organize the wood, which is then either skidded or carried on a "forwarder"to a landing area where it's loaded on to trucks. The guys cutting with saws and log drives are a thing of the past.
     
  26. x39

    x39 Hyperborean Supporter

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    The rivers in Maine are the same. The channels were modified to ease the passage of logs thus totally changing the river ecology. I attended a really interesting lecture on this not long ago.
     
  27. TRYKER

    TRYKER Guide

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    my grandfather was a lumberjack up in maine be fore packing up grandma and the 6 kids (my father was 1 at the time) and moved to mass. why back in 1916. he died in '49 before i was born, i've never seen a pic of him. i have been told he was 5'8'' with a 36'' waist and a 66'' chest.
     
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