Making Your Veshmeshok the BestMeshok!

Discussion in 'Packs, Bags & Pouches' started by Zoev, Jun 9, 2013.

  1. Zoev

    Zoev Scout Bushclass II

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    This is a quick post on a few things that can make your Veshmeshok all around a better pack.

    First though, the references.
    What is a Veshmeshok?: http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php/90744-russian-Veschveshok?
    How to make one in an hour using household materials: http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php/78914-DIY-Ultralite-Veshmeshok?highlight=veshmeshok

    I really love this pack, but I had to go through a few things to make it better. The first thing that bothered me was the button. I was constantly having to re-sew it and I'm not really a fan of buttons anyways. So after a few minutes, one surplus S-95 button and a sewing kit I made a strong and durable button for the pack. (A wooden toggle would work just as well)
    [​IMG]

    Next, that wonderful little sack that is so great for holding things but requires oh so perfect packing so not to prick you in the back. There is a simple solution! I placed a cutting board lengthwise at the bottom of the pack, this adds some rigidity and protection. I'll frequently put my fleece hat and headnet in front of the board to add some padding.

    Then that pesky string, the string that closes the Veshmeshok that I really never found a use for. It always got tangled in things and the straps were sufficient enough to keep the sack shut so snip snip.

    What about rain? It's a simple solution. Have a contractor trashbag and untie you pack straps. Then put the bag over the entire pack and tie the straps over it. Instantly waterproof.

    The bedroll keeps slipping down and the pack ride too low for me! Here the solution is also simple, and frequently adopted by Soviet troops. Put the straps over the bedroll as the photo below shows and all your worries are fixed! I also recommend tightening up one of the straps at the bottom as with the closure method one side will be naturally longer than the other.
    [​IMG]

    But I can't carry waterbottles on my pack! Again, a simple solution. Replace your expensive nalgenes with powerade bottles, then secure the lower straps around the middle of the bottles. Note, this can also be used to secure other items:
    [​IMG]

    I hope you Veshmeshok owners can put this information to good use. And I hope this has inspired others to make/buy your own! It's a really wonderful pack.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2013
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  2. Airth

    Airth Scout

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    Nicely done! Can't beat simplicity...less to break, and easy to fix when it does.
     
  3. Flatfish

    Flatfish Tracker

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    Hmmm, interesting. The straps on mine are actually quite short. I don't think I could wear it over a jacket in the winter if it's packed full....I must have gotten a smaller size but i could not wear the straps over the bedroll.
     
  4. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Supporter Supporter

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    excellent treatise on KISS ...
     
  5. Zoev

    Zoev Scout Bushclass II

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    There's only one size to my knowledge. I'm pretty skinny, so when I saw a few photos of soviet troops doing this I tried it out (they were skinny too). I don't know what to tell you other than test and modify! The Veshmeshok is a great platform for both!
     
  6. Zoev

    Zoev Scout Bushclass II

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    After some testing I figured how how to lengthen the straps. Find the center of the straps. Tie a larks head with some cord at the center point. Then use the rest of the cord to tie around the top of the pack (how the straps usually would).
     
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  7. the-lorax

    the-lorax Tracker

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    Awesome thread title! I had never heard of or seen this pack before - thanks for teaching me something new!
     
  8. m1cajah

    m1cajah Tinder Gatherer

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    Newbie here. Engaging in a little thread necromancy to thank the OP for this writeup. I bought one of these a month ago and this was very helpful. The pack is quickly becoming my favorite little day-hike/single overnighter pack.

    I replaced the button with a deer antler toggle and sewed a BCUSA leather patch on the pocket flap...otherwise everything else you wrote was spot on.

    Thanks!
     
  9. Slc1322

    Slc1322 Tracker

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    Well since this thread has already been Resurrected once, hopefully no one will be upset if I throw a few tips on it myself.

    As far as adding rigidity to the pack I made a triangle frame for the inside using some odd gear wraps my girlfriend had. The ones I have are covered in some sort of neoprene or something similar, making them soft and comfortable, but anything slightly rigid yet still malleable will do the trick. I was going to use metal coat hangers until I found the gear wraps. Next, between the "frame" and my back I put my self inflating seat. I only half inflate it, but it makes for an excellent cushion. After that, any extra clothing or usually my hpg mountain serape gets packed on the bottom as you can see in the photo. At that point how I pack the rest of the bag is pretty trip and gear specific, so it changes frequently. I pack my plash palatka as shown by Zoev and I can't express how much better the bag rides because of it. I also use the plash palatka as storage space if going on a weekend trip and carrying extra clothes or other soft stuffs. The contractors bag is another staple in my map pouch, thanks to Zoev's suggestion, and definitely worth having. Currently I'm in the process of trying to modify the straps for more comfort when carrying a full bag for the weekend, but for a day hike the straps do well with a modest amount of weight. Sorry for the long post but between Zoev's suggestions and the frame I made I have really come to appreciate the simplicity and effectiveness of the veshmeshok.
     

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