Medical Safety Thoughts When Aloft

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by grey mouse, Jun 8, 2018.

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Do you carry emergency information with you for others to read if an emergency arises ?

  1. Yes

    13 vote(s)
    52.0%
  2. No

    11 vote(s)
    44.0%
  3. Sometimes

    1 vote(s)
    4.0%
  1. grey mouse

    grey mouse Scout

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    For anyone out aloft who either has a medical condition or allergic reaction to certain things such as bees, penicillin, etc that would require quick or special treatment on the trail how should we communicate it safely? For example... you come across a hiker that is unresponsive (bee sting) and you don't know that he carries an EpiPen for such matters somewhere on them. No cell phone signal and no PLB (Personal Locating Beacon) included. Naturally (disclaimer) I'm not saying diagnose and treat if your not a doctor but rather is there a unified/universal way that we can communicate to another hiker or first responder that we have a condition ?

    I know that there are some wrist bands or items in use by some organizations or fields but a thru-hiker or just many people may not wear them on hikes due to discomfort. Is there a way to put say a red band on the top left shoulder strap to signify a laminated first aid card that would be stored say in the hip belt? Something like :

    Mike Smith
    51yrs Old
    123 Soldier Lane
    Northcutt, AZ 55555

    Emergency Contact Number: (123) 456-7890

    Past heart attack /2012
    Allergic to bee stings
    EpiPen In hip Belt/Left side

    I mention this because I'm unaware of any universal means that hikers use and it would be a great preparedness tool for many. It's also just a good thing to think of in advance especially if solo hiking.
     
  2. Naturalist

    Naturalist Guide

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    Interesting topic and I believe this is a good idea that should be encouraged.
     
  3. Black5

    Black5 Supporter Supporter

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    My wife put a gun to my head years ago when work required me to be so far away from home. She found a set of my dogtags.
    Name, blood type, and special one for penicillin allergy. She then had a military shop make a third one with emergency names and numbers. Now, if they ever find my broken and battered body she is sure to receive her rightfully gained insurance check.:dblthumb:
     
  4. Swampdog

    Swampdog Supporter Supporter

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    I live alone in a town I moved to after I retired, don't know a whole lot of people and my son lives five hours away.

    My EDC "jewelry" is a ID bracelet that I ordered from: www.RoadId.com it has my name, year of birth, town, state, USA, two contact names with phone numbers,
    and medical information.

    I ride a bike and don't always have my wallet with me, so it gives me peace of mind knowing that if I get hit by a truck the authorities can identify me and contact my son.
     
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  5. grey mouse

    grey mouse Scout

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    Here is my idea so far. You would attach it to any pack at the top of the shoulder strap that corresponds to the side that you placed the info in the pocket. I can get these in plastic as shown below or tyvek. Of course I would need to order several thousand to make it economical lol.

    Tyvek
    [​IMG]
    Plastic
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2018
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  6. Bitterroot Native

    Bitterroot Native Indigenous Skills Junkie

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    Great post! Bracelets, dog tags, even medical tattoos are all good ways to relay medical information to someone who might happen upon your unconscious body. I knew a few soldiers when I was in the Army who had their blood type tattooed on their chest that way if a blood transfusion was quickly needed their blood type would be readily visible.
     
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  7. grey mouse

    grey mouse Scout

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    We always carried an extra dog tag in the boot laces of our combat boots so that they could put the legs with the correct body. Also the enemy might remove your tags from around your neck.
     
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  8. central joe

    central joe Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I do have a dog tag with name, address etc, but don't at the current time have any medical conditions. joe
     
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  9. grey mouse

    grey mouse Scout

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    The purpose would be to signify that you have something like this stored on you (credit card sized) since a dog tag or wrist band could possibly be lost. It would also be lighter than many other options.
    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I give all patients that may need one, a pre printed card for them to fill out. It will save time and keep things simple for me. This is extensive, for people likely to be transported.

    Name
    Address
    Phone Number
    DOB
    SSN
    Medical History
    Medications (inc dosages)
    Allergies
    Primary MD
    Primary Emergency Contact
    Insurance Info.

    Medical Bracelets are always a good idea for major medical conditions.
    IE
    Life threatening allergies
    Seizure Disorders
    Diabetics
    Blood Thinning RX

    Emergency contact info bracket / tag for persons with Dementia or Alzheimer’s.

    When I did contracting my dog tags were primarily for recovery ID purposes.

    Full Name
    SSN
    Unit
    Blood Type* (Silly but it was the cool thing to do.) - NKMA

    Otherwise we carried unit orders and emergency info in a waterproof pouch left cargo pant pocket.

    Edit to Add.
    Blood type is silly unless you are high speed SF stationed in middle of nowhere with a emergency transfusion kit.
    Otherwise you will be receiving universal or be typed screened.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2018
  11. Pinelogcreek

    Pinelogcreek Supporter Supporter

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    I’m subject to anaphylactic shock from seafood and have nearly died that way years ago. I carry dog tags with name, ssn, allergy type, and the number to the 24 hour dispatch where I work. I know that if someone calls there they will get my info and my family will be notified. When I retire I’ll have to find a new number.
     
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  12. that_guy

    that_guy Tracker

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    These are all a great idea. But like @Medic17 said, blood type is 100% useless. I see it so often though.
     
  13. Oni

    Oni Scout

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  14. Bridgetdaddy

    Bridgetdaddy Guide

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    My cell phone has a place for emergency ID. I put my name, allergies, contact numbers in it. No ID numbers like social or bank numbers.
     
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  15. oddjob35

    oddjob35 Scout

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    Several possibles ….

    1) Program a number into your cellphone with the contact name as ICE (In Case of Emergency), can contain lots of notes about who to contact and medical background. I understand the emergency services are trained to check for this when a cellphone is available, though I suspect it is not the first place they look and it is not visible during a quick check by a first responder!

    2) There is a whole raft of emergency/medic alert "jewelry" ranging from pendants on necklaces/chains (including those that can open and hold a piece of paper), to a variety of medic alert bracelets. These mostly rely on some sort of engraving to give the EMERGENCY or Life Threatening details, so keep them brief and pertinent as @Medic17 mentions above. For those with a Bushcraft/survival mindset, there is even a paracord SOS bracelet that I happened to spot whilst browsing thru Google (NO connections or recommendation, but you can see it here …. https://www.n-styleid.com/seal-6-pa...L8oRBxtNYX1xQZ4JNzW4T8HLQ9PSukohoC-eEQAvD_BwE).

    3) Tattoo medical alert details or life threatening data on your wrist (perhaps inside the wrist where they look to get your pulse) so that it is readily seen by paramedics or similar first aiders.

    What I would emphasize is that, whatever you use, you make sure that it is easily seen by a member of the public or paramedic without having to strip you down or rummage through pockets, wallets or phones. The person who gets to you first in an emergency is going to be more worried about keeping you alive and trying to work out what is wrong with you so any alert mechanism must be quite readily visible (even if that points to something more comprehensive tucked in your wallet in a hip pocket). A first aider in particular is not going to rummage through pockets etc. in case they get accused of robbing the patient!!! Loosening a collar button is not necessarily going to let a paramedic/first aider see an alert necklace.

    So my major point is that you make certain that whatever method you choose is readily visible or have something that IS visible pointing at the detailed info wherever that is kept. From past experience I (as a first aider) felt really foolish when shown a medic alert card AFTER the fact! OK it was only a training scenario, BUT ….

    Hope this helps.

    OJ
     
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