Mora Chipped!

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by SpecialAgentDBCooper, Dec 12, 2018.

  1. SpecialAgentDBCooper

    SpecialAgentDBCooper Scout

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    Hola!

    Went hunting with the old man. Lucky bastard got a deer.

    I got a leg. For jerky.

    Sharpened the Mora, deboned. Then tried to remove leg bone from the hip bone. For my dog. tough to separate. Thought batoning it with my knife would help a bit. It did not. Didn't think it would chip though.

    What to do now? Leave it? Or sand it down, sharpen as usual? Don't mind the rust. That usually comes off easily.
     

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  2. Haggis

    Haggis Bushmaster

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    Leave it, learn from it, eventually you’ll sharpen down to it.
     
  3. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Triple posted.
     
  4. central joe

    central joe Wait For Me!! Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    It'll sharpen out over time, don't worry bout it young fellar. joe
     
  5. PVF1

    PVF1 Supporter Supporter

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    I'm gonna respectfully disagree and suggest that those chips are a bit too big to leave, especially if OP needs a good clean edge for making shavings, etc. They're not just microchips from carbides pulling out or whatever, those are real (but still on the small end) chips. I would sharpen them out on like a 220 grit stone and bring the primary bevel up just a bit so that OP doesn't change the overall grind too much. Just a bit of thinning to ease that shoulder. Then OP can finish at 1K and strop.

    It'll be a good learning/sharpening experience to bring that thing back to fighting shape.

    If you do leave the edge as is and just rehabilitate it over time with successive sharpening sessions, just be kinda mindful of those chips as you continue to use the knife. You can get "walking" chips that expand over time as the altered edge geometry subjects the edge to stresses that it wasn't designed to handle.

    Thems my two cents anyway!
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2018
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  6. Outdoor Dauber

    Outdoor Dauber Roughian #3 Supporter

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    First off, I'd say you need to work on finding the joint and not the bone. As for the blade....that will take some work and time to work out.
     
  7. svh

    svh Supporter Supporter

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    This.
     
  8. Outdoor Dauber

    Outdoor Dauber Roughian #3 Supporter

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    BTW, I battoned my Mora 511 right thru the brisket of a mature Whitetail doe this year. No issues whatsoever; no rolling, no chipping, nothing.
     
  9. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    Get the "5 gallon" type of paint stirrers and glue progressively finer grits from 180 to 1000 on them. Strop the edge and you'll have a scary sharp knife. YMMV
     
  10. cbrianroll

    cbrianroll Professional Tinkerer Supporter

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    Not knowing your skillset it's hard to say.....I would grind out the chips and sharpen it. If your not able to grind it out then sharpen and use it until you wear them out.
     
  11. Moe M.

    Moe M. Supporter Supporter

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    We all do silly things from time to time, mistakes are the best teachers and the more expensive the item damaged the more ingrained the lesson, I once tried to open an oyster with the tip of a favored Buck 110 folding hunter, I was able to save the knife by reprofiling the tip making the blade about 3/8' shorter than it was originally, lesson learned.
    Mora used to make great outdoor knives, back in the '60's and '70's I used Mora hunting and fishing knives exclusively, that's when they were made out of good carbon steel, had nicely contoured birch handles and came with leather sheaths, they hand ground and finished their knives the old fashioned way.
    Then Mora decided that doing it right wasn't as profitable as they needed it to be, so rather than raise prices they lowered quality and began making utility knives with uncomfortable painted handles and supplied them with cheap plastic sheaths.
    Following market demands for the 21 century Mora came out with some new designs more suited to outdoor tasks and raised their prices accordingly, a better utility knife (if you will allow me to be candid), but still not near the quality and looks of their earlier productions, too bad really.
    The bottom line is, conventional knives are not designed to cut or baton through bone, that's why they invented saws, and it's hard for Mora or any knife maker to make a blade that won't roll or chip when put to hard use and still sell for cheap money, it's just the nature of the beast.
     
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  12. SpecialAgentDBCooper

    SpecialAgentDBCooper Scout

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    Sh**! Sorry! I didn't realize! I was having issues uploading the images, but didn't realize it triple posted. Thanks Admin for fixing!
     
  13. chndlr04

    chndlr04 roughian #2 Supporter

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    What kind of Mora is it? Depending on the value I would probably toss the knife and get a new one due to the work to get the bevel back on one continuous line. And practice on finding the joint and not baton a bone next time, saw a bone instead.
     
  14. SpecialAgentDBCooper

    SpecialAgentDBCooper Scout

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    Thanks for the input y'all!

    I was in fact aiming for the joint when batoning. I didn't think I was going through raw bone of that size. I guess I just missed. Once I was able to get the blade in there, the bone popped right out.

    Won't be making that mistake again.

    It is one of those carbon companion Moras. It cost.. I think $28CAD, which is nothing.. but damn.. I've purchased 3 knives this year.. DO I REALLY NEED ANOTHER ONE???

    I think I'm bordering knife fetish territory.. while I'm sure many of you are already there. ;) ;) ;)

    I think what I'm going to do is sand down just the area that is chipped. It looks a bit rough to just leave, and I'm definitely not skilled enough to shave down the whole blade, so it's going to have a bit of a dip. Smooth dip.
     
  15. GreyOne

    GreyOne Elder Lifetime Supporter

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    Resharpen with a micro bevel, it will work fine. I have mostly mesquite and post oak in my area, and the Mora factory edge chipson those if not careful. On soft woods or flesh it works fine.
     
  16. PVF1

    PVF1 Supporter Supporter

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    If you want to get into hand sharpening, and don't want to pay through the nose to get started, take a look at the King PB-05 combo stone. It's a synthetic whetstone made in Japan, 220 grit on one side (to grind out those chips) and 800 grit on the other (to reestablish your edge). A little bit of compound on some leather to strop. Or you can get the 1,000/6,000 combo stone also and use the 6K side for finishing.

    Knives and stones are a huge rabbit hole though, so don't say you weren't warned :54:
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2018
  17. Winterhorse

    Winterhorse Supporter Supporter

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    Just because it’s me, I’d go ahead and work that edge down to original profile starting with 150. To me, bringing a knife back to life is something I like to do.
    True, it’s an inexpensive knife but I’m cheap and tend to use tools until they’re used up. Besides, you can look back on that knife and the time you used it to process that deer.
    That’s just what I’d do.
     
  18. Riverpirate

    Riverpirate Supporter Supporter

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    This is what scares me about the scandi grind
     
  19. designtom

    designtom Men Of Action #43 Supporter

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    You guys are pro's

    I'm an amateur

    I've done that before. I imagine that being thick headed, I'll do it again.

    I'd hit it with a file, and get to work with some sandpaper on wood as suggested above.

    That knife is far from dead.

    From these learning experiences, you will start to question pure Scandi grind ...........
     
  20. bluecow

    bluecow Scout

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    I did the same thing years ago with a Dexter Russel knife. It was then that i decided to use the right tool for the job of splitting and chopping. also, to learn to joint meet.
     
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  21. rahan27

    rahan27 Scout

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    Improper use of scandi grind.
     
  22. rahan27

    rahan27 Scout

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    OP you should convex that edge. That knife is not gonna be a great carver, but will function wonderfully as a utility blade.
     
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  23. geojag

    geojag Supporter Supporter

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    My initial response was "Baton through bone, what do you expect!?", But then I remembered just a couple of years ago I incurred similar damage to a stainless Mora cutting through squirrel foot joints, under hand pressure.

    I don't know if it is the steel or the grind, but I have found moras to chip or roll very easily, carbon and stainless. After adding a secondary bevel, I didn't experience the same, so I would be inclined to say it is the grind. I have a lot of other knives with hollow, saber, or flat grind with a secondary bevel and have never had the edge issues I have had with Scandi grind moras. I keep telling myself I need to get a high end Scandi to try, but my past experiences with the only Scandis I have used (moras) have prevented me from doing so.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2019
  24. goon

    goon Scout

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    Honestly, it’s a tool. I’d sharpen as well as you can and just use it. Eventually it’ll sharpen out. I’ve seen old Case, Schrade, and Barlow knives with tips reprofiled to save them after similar mistakes. I’ve seen Old Hickory butcher knives sharpened down to the width of a filet knife - used until they’re entirely gone. The frontiersmen, Courier du Bois, and Native tribes of old would have just sharpened the blade and moved on.
     
  25. Paulyseggs

    Paulyseggs Supporter Supporter

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    That sounds like a good idea

    Think aerosol adhesive is strong enough?
     
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  26. Hillbilly stalker

    Hillbilly stalker Scout

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    78243FB5-B30A-41AF-858F-3A1001BFB337.jpeg If you are near a Wal Mart, go to the aisle that has auto body repair. Pick up a couple of these wet sanding blocks. They come in different grits for less that $5. They have a thick sturdy foam in the middle. Best love a knife can get. They last forever, wipe off when dirty. Weigh nearly nothing. 4x4 inches I believe.
     
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  27. Hillbilly stalker

    Hillbilly stalker Scout

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    And you need to learn how to bust the hip joint, I've done it a hundred times with a pocket knife without damage. Work the tip, don't pry.
     
  28. SpookyPistolero

    SpookyPistolero Slow learner Lifetime Supporter Bushclass I

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    Eh, we've all done something we wished we hadn't with a tool. And especially in the outdoors, you're more frequently using a tool other than as intended, since you don't have a full complement of equipment.

    You're choices are sharpen as you would a scandi until the shoulder is back a few mm. Will take some work. Or convex it (still work, maybe a bit less) and buy a new mora soon. If you've got a belt sander, the latter would be tempting.

    Let us know what you come up with.
     
  29. oathkeeper762

    oathkeeper762 Bushbum & PT Wanderer Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    If you use your Moras hard, as many of us do, edge chipping is not at all uncommon. Having worked with 100’s of Scouts over the years, trust me when I say I’ve seen lots of edge damage. Yours will require some work if you want to bring it back to a uniform edge but if it were mine I’d just sharpen it as usual and use it for tougher tasks. Overtime you will sharpen it back into a uniform edge or there maybe more chips in your future only the knife Gods know for sure. Finding that ball joint can be a little tough at times. YMMV.
     
  30. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    Yeppers. More than.
     
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  31. Flint_2016

    Flint_2016 Rusty Hobbyist

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    I used my Ken Onion WorkSharp on a DPX HEST knife that had a few nicks in the blade.A few passes on the coarse grit belt took em right out.
     
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  32. Oldguy59

    Oldguy59 Supporter Supporter

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    Moras are inexpensive, id buy a new one for finer tasks and sharpen and use that one for other work. Sooner or later you’ll sharpen out the chips. And not spend a few hours on a 15$ knife.
     
  33. americanstrat98

    americanstrat98 Wanderer Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Easiest method I have in my bag is to avoid bones all together. The only joints I have to work with are the neck, and front legs. The hind legs get deboned. I've never chipped a Scandi knife on a carcass.

    Sharpen your knife, and continue to use it. Lord knows we already have enough people throwing stuff away. Instead learn to repair the knife, and adjust your technique.
     
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  34. swe_lapland

    swe_lapland Tracker

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    To me atleast, knives are meant to be used. SOmetimes I run into a task that damages a part of my blade, its always my fault, but at that time, I think its worth it. Id just go on and use it. Youll sharpen it out sooner or later. I dont know about morakniv prices in the US though, but to me a Morakniv is a user. A tacklebox/glovebox/handbag/sockdrawer-tool and its meant to be used. I use a 2000 when I hunt, the compound-ground it alot better for getting into those joints IMHO.
     
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  35. Silvuhboolit

    Silvuhboolit Florida Feller Supporter

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    Yeah...don’t do that. Blades don’t hammer well through bone. Any of my other knives would have done the same I feel.

    Cutting instruments only. You could try a cold chisel in the future if you need a better tool for that job.
     
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  36. Sloany

    Sloany Supporter Supporter

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    NOT FAR ENOUGH NORTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
    Get a heavier bladed knife, or use a small bladed hatchet.
     
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  37. americanstrat98

    americanstrat98 Wanderer Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    For what purpose? Using a hatchet to chop through joints will chip the hatchet as well. What good is a heavy blade for skinning, or for anything knife related for that matter? Because we want it? At least that would make sense, because it is certainly not a necessity.
     
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  38. GBinGA

    GBinGA Tracker

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    A mora companion costs less than $20 US last time I looked. The blade is less than .125 thick. They work great, and are very versatile, but are certainly not indestructible. And the kind of edge you put on a knife depends on how you want to use it.

    All knives are a compromise of one kind or another. A K-bar is pretty hard to damage, but it isn't a very good slicer compared to a Mora. Look at a fillet knife, or a chefs knife. Outstanding for what they are intended for, but certainly not to be batoned through a tree branch.

    You get a blade and learn how to use it properly. Maybe you want to give up slicing ability to get a blade that resits abuse better. Fine. Maybe you want a thinner blade that really cuts, and remember to use a saw or a hatchet when called for. Great. Maybe you carry two different knives with you (which is lighter than a knife plus a hatchet). But if you think there is a such a thing as a "perfect" blade you are kidding yourself.

    That, of course, is an opinion. Most people have a few. I don't mean to imply than mine is worth any more than you are paying for it. :)
     

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