Mushroom ID and boletes

Discussion in 'Flora & Fauna' started by hlydon, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. hlydon

    hlydon Scout

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    Is anyone familiar with this mushroom. I’ve seen quite a few of them over the last couple of months. I’ve found them in SW Ohio. They are usually 6-8”, and the older ones have flat caps and the edges are often split.

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    Anyone eat boletes? Recommended cooking? Sauté? Fry?

    Not sure what’s going on with these mushrooms.

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  2. TWill

    TWill Guide

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    No idea on either one but that cluster of them with the thread wisps is so bizarre. My wild guess is that there is another fungi parasitizing them and that is where it will release the spores.
     
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  3. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I wouldn't eat the ones in the last picture. :)
     
  4. OrdinarySpring

    OrdinarySpring Tinder Gatherer

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    I've eaten boletes. Porcini is always choice but I've taken slippery jack as well if pickings were slim. I just pan fried them in butter. With porcinis, I'd just trim the base of the stalk and slice the whole thing up. They're quite good.

    With the slippery jacks, I peeled the skin off of the cap and scraped the spore tubes off, using only the white flesh. It sacrifices a lot of material and it's a bit of a clumsy affair. Not sure what kind of boletes you'll find but the skin of the slippery jack caps are pretty gross and have some reputation for causing an upset stomach otherwise. Taste/texture wise there's not a lot to report. They're spongy and cook down in volume a LOT. I wouldn't say that it's similar to tofu but there's a conceptual kinship. They have a funny way of deflating and inflating in the pan when you mess around with them.

    I'm sure you'll be diligent about ID but one thing which easily rules out poisonous ones is to scrape the spore tubes with a stick. If it bruises blue, discard it. You can probably find footage on YouTube. In the area I've harvested them, it's the only test necessary for a poisonous bolete but I don't know if this applies everywhere.

    I've got nothing on the ID but I really wish I could look at that cluster of little brown ones in person. It's a reminder to carry a loupe with me on hikes and hunts. Those pinhead whisker deals are pretty interesting.
     

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