My conclusion re: bug out bags

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Ptpalpha, Nov 13, 2018.

  1. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    After giving it a great deal of thought, my conclusion is that a quote/unquote bug out bag is exactly the same as what I would carry on a 3-5 day outing, with the possible addition of extra ammo.
    Trying to be realistic, I simply can't carry any more weight than I already do, and trying to figure out an "Im never coming back" scenario is pointless for the same reason.
    So instead I'm simply going to keep refining my camping gear with an eye towards quality and weight reduction, get into the habit of having a get home bag with me at all times (a topic for another thread), and focus on at-home supplies should a "bug-in" ever be necessary.
    Just my opinions, offered here in our safe place.
    -Paul
     
  2. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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    I think encrypted USB keys, with scans of important docs/titles/blahblah are important, for the microscopic space and weight penalty they impose. What if civilization is just fine, but your house burns, and you can't go back?

    Likewise, I think if you have a USB key with your life on it, you should have several copies scattered around in different places.
     
  3. RavenLoon

    RavenLoon axology student Supporter

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    I would probably have my passport, birth certificate, extra cash and precious metals in a bugout bag, which are items I never take on an average outing.
     
  4. PAcanis

    PAcanis Supporter Supporter

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    If by bug out you mean evacuate, like so many have had to do when disaster strikes, then I can see bringing ID and thumb drives or whatever. But if bug out means leaving and never coming back, I'm leaving my ID at home. I don't think I'll need it.
    I'm a bug inner :)
     
  5. hlydon

    hlydon Guide

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    I bounce back and forth between making my bugout bag essentially the same as a day hike and a 3-day camping trip.
     
  6. Black5

    Black5 Supporter Supporter

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    My bug out bag is for leaving home, with changes of clothes and important papers, cell chargers, etc.

    My GHB is the fun one. That's the bushcrafty survival bag I carry back and forth when making my weekly commute. And I've learned from several people here and other places that I can carry less crap, more of what I need, and still reduce weight. The lighter the pack, the further and faster I can move. Survival does not always mean comfort, but does not necessarily mean misery either.
     
  7. central joe

    central joe Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I'd say ya got some pretty sound reasoning young fellar, kinda of what I think also. We're either both right, or both wrong. joe
     
  8. Jacob

    Jacob Supporter Supporter

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    I like what you came up with, mine is very similar. It’s a tried and true ultralight backpacking setup with extra med stuff, food, and water bladders. There’s also a few longer term survival things too. The problem where I live is water, it might be a days walk or more from where I frequently work so a bunch of water and bladders are included. All of it is stuffed in a big British surplus backpack that isn’t terribly uncomfortable (I’m an ultralight wuss after all). I figure the bag is likely to sit in the back seat and rot in the sun so I’d save some money and sacrifice a little weight and comfort.

    It seems like the things that get used most frequently are the cordage and snare wire but the wee-axe has gotten me out of a bind and saved a climbing trip too.

    ICAGC bag to the rescue! aka, in case I accidentally get to go camping bag.
    667F9841-A26E-4D18-995A-5593D018AF4D.jpeg

    4B78D31E-4FF0-4217-A209-E6BFC3CCDB4C.jpeg

    I would be curious to see how other folk bags change depending on where they live. I wouldn’t know where to start with an urban bag, In parts of Louisiana I would trade the whole thing for a blow up raft and a bug net. It would be fun to hear other peoples ideas and why they think it would most likely be used.
     
  9. NJStricker

    NJStricker Supporter Supporter

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    The problem with bug out bags is they start with the gear and bag, not the scenario that forces you to bug out. If the SHTF tomorrow camping is not an option for me with the other 3 million people in the Columbus Ohio area.
     
  10. Mikewood

    Mikewood Guide

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    You might look at the Dr. Strangelove movie for BOB ideas. They have a survival kit that is spot on.

    When I started All the preparedness stuff I considered a onion layer approach. What do I have in my pockets. Then my bag then my truck and then my home. My truck is hard shelter. Should I have to abandon it a military poncho should do for a day or three as I walk home. They worked for guys in Vietnam for months). Half s talk of gas and $200 in small bills will get put out of most situations. Throw some tools in a duffel bag and you are set. I don’t need extra clothes. I can wear the same ones for a couple weeks straight.

    I just hate seeing folks spend hunderds or thousands of dollars for the slim chance to live like a hobo for three days. If something major happens get a shopping cart.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2018
  11. JAY

    JAY Guide

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    My day hike haversack, plus canteen, is my BOB. Weight and bulk is important. space blanked inside, with military poncho strapped under. Truck has resupply, plus extras in case I am fortunate enough to have it close.
     
  12. BradGad

    BradGad Supporter Supporter

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    Mikewood touched on this... the BOB should include a chunk of cash... which you probably don’t take backpacking.
     
  13. Ron

    Ron Guide

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    I am with Marbleman here; backups of important documents, both digital and hardcopy, a knife, flashlight, lighter, basic first aid, backup mes if required and cash seem to be the most important things. Maybe a handgun for you folks on yonder side of the Large Pond. A tarp and blankets in the car if they can be kept dry there.
    Anythings else might be considered bonus or a hindrance.
    Wherever you go if you need to get out, there will be shelters and people with food. I am thinking calamities like California, not all out war or severe civil unrests.
     
  14. Black5

    Black5 Supporter Supporter

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    How I think I'll look bugging out:
    notes-misc-rev-cl-alice-05.jpg


    How I'll probably look in reality: 86061600_homeless.jpg
     
  15. oddjob35

    oddjob35 Scout

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    I really feel that you have to give a bit more thought to the possible scenarios or situations that are going to cause you to "bug out". Are you really going to be bugging out for 3-5 days so that you can get away with your current hiking set up and are you going to be bugging out on foot so that you need to keep down the weight of what you can carry?

    Take for example, the California Fire Storm last week. Firstly you are unlikely to try and walk away from that, so loading up a truck with gear is not going to cause you problems. Secondly do you only want to save one rucksack worth of gear from your home and is 3-5 days worth of stuff going to be enough? Similarly the recent hurricane that hit the Carolinas and flooded people out of their homes or even took down their home.

    I have mentioned in other threads that my plan is to bug in for most situations that do not directly affect my home, but that are some scenarios that might cause me to go with my bug out plan (e.g. Chemical spill or hurricane). If it does get around to me being forced to leave my home it means that I am going to load my truck with as much useful stuff as I can (a lot being pre-packed in totes ready to grab and go like family "glamping" gear), especially important documents (or thumb drive copies) and lots of data/family photos etc. backed up from my PC onto a portable hard drive, some cash and a large limit credit card. This should allow me to get by for a few weeks without too much problem (with my current plans) and potentially longer by adding stuff at the "away site" if we need to stay away. I am not sure how long it will take people to get back to living in a home again (IF ever!!) after the California fires, but it certainly is not going to be a few days or even a few weeks.

    Just some of MY thoughts and yes I understand that everybody plans for different scenarios in different ways so YMMV. Just wondering if people had considered some of the more extreme things that have happened recently and if that causes people to re-think and/or re-plan their current bug out plans?

    OJ
     
  16. Black5

    Black5 Supporter Supporter

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    I may have mentioned before that in a reality of bug out for weather related incidents or when possible the 18 ft self contained camper is loaded to go. Cash on hand, a portable fuel tank which can be mounted in my truck, and plenty of food and water in the camper with backup supplies in the truck in case of being separated from the camper.
     
  17. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    In an effort to keep this thread from spinning out of control, please note that my post was specifically regarding bug out bags, not bug out vehicles.
    A bag or pack that's going to be the one you grab when bugging out. Not the bag you pack when it's time to go, the one you grab.
    Everything else is still very relevant, just not to my original post.
     
  18. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I hope that didn't come across as snarky; if so I apologise. Monday morning I blew out my back, and my week got worse from there.
     
  19. Bryan King

    Bryan King Supporter Supporter

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    Hope your back is better. Bug out bags seem to be a very sticky subject . Myself I think about why bug out , I live in very rural area in the Mnt's a lot of natural resources. So wildfires are the biggest threat. So that bug out bag would reflect a different reasoning than others. But for now I have just a go bag I grab for about a three day stay while hunting ,fishing , camping, bushcraft . I just add or subtract as activity dictates. But I can see by whatever environment and situation your in the bag contents would change, and a lot of thought and preparedness would be needed. I like seeni g these discussions on the diff .views.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2018
  20. Geezer Butler

    Geezer Butler Tracker

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    I have pondered the "bug out bag" concept myself for many years now and I have reached some similar conclusions. I am a believer in having whatever you consider your bag with you 100% of the time as opposed to my old ways of having a perfect bag sitting in a closet at home. I focused on reducing weight for the big 3 (pack, tent, sleeping bag) several years ago and that was so worth it. I now focus more on improving my outdoor and medical skills and those of my team (family), and simplify at every opportunity. My real life emergencies have been getting my Jeep stuck in a river (in the rain) and needing my emergency pack to start a fire to keep everyone warm, and medical emergencies for my dad and strangers (motorcycle accidents mainly). I am in phase 2 of my gear thinning exercise, and it feels refreshing. It took me 46 years, but I may have figured out the approach that makes sense for me. I still have way too many knives :)
     
  21. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I was with you all the way until your last sentence.
    :cool:
     
  22. ralphtt

    ralphtt Supporter Supporter

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    Hope your back gets better real quick, Paul.

    I can tell by your last post that you haven't changed a lot!
     
  23. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Always great to see you, old friend.
    My back was just reminding me that I've been neglecting my core exercises.
    Message received!
     
  24. ra2bach

    ra2bach Supporter Supporter

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    my bug out bag is a Jeep Grand Cherokee. with a trailer...
     
  25. oddjob35

    oddjob35 Scout

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    No worries Paul, it didn't come across that way to me, and I do hope that your back feels better soon. Keep up those exercises!

    I hope my rambling note did not go too far from your OP. I was (in effect) asking what scenario(s) you are considering that would involve bugging out with only the one bag, containing gear suitable for 3-5 days and which would be carried by you (presumably rucksack)? Or, are you talking about an emergency bag that you carry with you at all times? Have I misread/misinterpreted the purpose of your bag?

    To show my thinking I was trying to give examples of why I would only bug out if my home was under a severe threat of being destroyed or becoming uninhabitable for a period of time (probably exceeding a week). In which case I would be taking as much as I could fit in my truck and going to my bug out location. However that does not seem to be your scenario, so you have me intrigued.

    I do also have a couple of other emergency bags, one at home for quick trips away (rather than what I consider to be a bug out) and the other is a truck based bag which can be used in an emergency to either stay with the truck until rescued or potentially to make my way home (so almost a GHB). Think day pack with suitable contents to extend to an overnight with a few extra tools to help with say a downed tree across the road and shovel to help get out of mud/snow.

    OJ
     
  26. CSM1970

    CSM1970 Guide

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    Bug out? To where? I have no place to run to besides home so I have a get home bag in each vehicle. The GH bag will get us out of the area to avoid storms, fires and floods, too. I have no plans to never come back. If there is nothing to come back to, I will stay elsewhere and be a burden to the government.
     
  27. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Just a quick thought: if a vehicle is an option, simply combining the get home bag with the pre-packed 3-5 day camping ruck covers many bases.
    So: the GHB is already in the truck. Check.
    The 3-5 day ruck is packed and ready to go. Check.
    Throw the ruck in the truck, grab wallet, keys, etc, and you're looking at all of 5 minutes.
    Now you're fully mobile with options.
     
  28. LongChinJon

    LongChinJon Guide

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    In my area, evacuation (or bug-out) scenarios almost always mean inbound hurricanes, although they can also mean storm-related flooding or even a chemical or nuclear plant incident. (Not that it has ever been the last one, thank the Lord.)

    Not many people here in hurricane country keep an evacuation bag ready-packed, although it is a really good idea.

    Having both evacuated from hurricanes and having left my house due to flooding that caused the loss of a lot of our stuff, the difference (for me) between a camping bag and evacuation bag is that my evacuation bag would hopefully have the cash in small bills and important documents (ID, insurance, etc.) that others mention above; personal meds and hi-viz items (like a traffic vest and orange emergency blanket) might also be added. If I have to hitchhike, fix a flat, or wave to a helicopter from a tree, I want to be easy to spot! :)

    I don't live in a rural area, though. If I did, more camping stuff might be a good idea.
     
  29. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Just started thinking that the flash drive with personal information might be a good addition to the camping ruck. Wouldn't take up any space, weighs almost nothing, and gives peace of mind.
     
  30. K7JLJ

    K7JLJ Tracker

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    I have a BOB in the house and GHB in the car. There is no scenario I have imagined where my wife and I are packing out with the BOB leaving the homestead.

    It's purpose is to be thrown in the truck during my 5min EVAC drill or the 23ft 5th Wheel during my 1hr EVAC drill and driven to where it is I need to go. It could just as well be a suitcase for that purpose, but the bag gives me the option to go on foot.

    It's not an INCH bag and I doubt most could live out of one of those for more than a few weeks anyway.
     
  31. lopie

    lopie Scout

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    how about Bug-Out Boxes? Along with your bug-out bag, just have stuff ready to toss into your car?
     
  32. RickS

    RickS Supporter Supporter

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    My wife brought up the subject of bug out bags this morning. Several of her friends lived in Paradise CA. She now wants a bag in the her car, where before when I brought it up all I got was an eye roll. I have a bag that I had built for her anyway, but decided I will give her an empty bag and see what she puts in it. The flash drive thing is a great idea. Thanks
     
  33. oddjob35

    oddjob35 Scout

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    Effectively that is what I have … I have a number of the large plastic Totes that I use to store my glamping and emergency gear in. Then if I did need to evacuate, they are quick and easy to load into the back of the truck, stack pretty well, are waterproof enough and can be readily ratcheted down to keep from loosing them. I do have "his and hers" emergency bags stashed in a tote as well which would allow us to grab them quickly if we did have to leave the truck for any reason, I just make sure that is the last tote loaded so it is readily accessible.

    My actual get out plan involves effectively "glamping" in the daughter's back yard which is several hours drive away and I feel comfortable that there is sufficient distance between us to avoid most disasters that could destroy my home. This way we benefit from the facilities of her home (shower/toilet) and her local environment like stores if we forgot or need additional stuff due to length of stay plus fresh goods/food (hence having some cash and a high limit card available).

    It may not be true "bug out" as some people see it, like living in the wilderness on a tract of land they own or even having a bunker to survive in, but it is good/practical enough to give me some sense of security if my home was severely threatened or some Governmental agency decide I had to leave! If I was given the 10 minute evac order then it would be down to the one tote with the emergency bags as a minimum and whatever gear I could throw in extra in the remaining 5 mins. It makes me think about getting a trailer which we could pretty much leave stocked and ready to go, but that will have to be a future project and not part of this thread LOL!

    OJ
     
  34. TrespassersWilliam

    TrespassersWilliam Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    If you hope to have fun spending time with family in the woods... living out of a minimalist survival setup may ensure they never want to go camping again.

    Imagine checking into a hotel for a week.

    Your family might have less stress adapting with things like:

    -toothbrushes
    -deoderant
    -ear plugs
    -paper plates
    -paper towels
    -sandwich bags
    -cutting board for meal prep
    -shelf-stable staple foods
    -phone charger
    -books
    -preferred coffee/tea

    ...or you can hit up a Walmart and hope it's just a personal emergency.

    The Walmarts around here start getting picked clean after ice storms/extended power outages.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2018
  35. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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    Bug in? Bug Out? Never coming back? Maybe coming back later? Who knows? These questions always rage on, in every BOB discussion. Regardless of your BOB hopes/plans, it can be a big help, to have your life on a USB stick. This is a big pile of docs, you can't (and shouldn't) carry them around with you. You can carry them easily on a USB stick. If you are planning on SHTF a computer may not be part of your plan, but they still can exist, somewhere.

    This is a lot of personal info. It is very important to ENCRYPT the whole thing. You need a scanner, and some time. No scanner, or no geeky friend? Take the pile to Kinko's.

    Some of these (car payments, mortgage payments) do not have to be updated monthly, but the presence of a few of them can help prove that you do indeed own that house, or that car. I keep a few that are potentially important to me (med list, eyeglasses prescriptions, contact list, insurance card) outside of the encrypted container, in case of emergency.

    This is a moderate task to get this done, but once you are, don't let it be The One Important One That I Must Not Lose. Copying them is easy. Make many, and leave them in many places. A family member's house, safe deposit box, desk drawer at work, one in every vehicle, one in every bag, one on every keychain.

    If you ever need some of this info, you may really, really need it. If your idea of a BOB is beans, bullets and gold, you still will have room for a USB stick, with your life on it.

    1. Photographs (if you have gigs of pics, consider zipping/compressing them for this)
    2. Vital Records
      1. Birth & Death Certificates
      2. Social Security Cards
      3. Marriage Certificates
      4. Divorce Papers
      5. Wills
      6. Immunization Records
      7. Business Licenses and Permits
      8. Passports
      9. FFL, Class 3 tax stamps, etc.
      10. Military records
    3. School Records
      1. Report Cards
      2. Diplomas
      3. Transcripts
      4. Training records and certifications.
      5. Awards & certificates.
    4. Work Records
      1. Current Resume
      2. List of accomplishments
      3. Awards and certificates
      4. Pay Stubs
      5. Latest W2 form.
      6. Licenses, permits, and other work related documents.
    5. Wallet Contents
      1. ID Cards & Driver's Licenses
      2. Credit Cards
      3. Special licenses and permits. (CHP, CCW, etc.)
    6. Insurance Records
      1. Health Insurance Cards
      2. Auto Insurance Cards
      3. Homeowner's Insurance Policy
    7. Property Documents
      1. Real Estate Documents
        1. Home Purchase Documents
        2. Rental and/or Lease Agreements
        3. Inspection documents
        4. Receipts for property improvements
      2. Auto Titles
      3. Auto Registrations
      4. Receipts for big ticket items
      5. Firearms records and receipts
    8. Medical Records
      1. Comprehensive lists of medications for each family member.
      2. Dental records & x-rays.
    9. Current bills.
      1. Utility bills.
      2. Car payments.
      3. Mortgage payments.
      4. Etc.
    10. Any other records, receipts, or financial documentation that would be difficult or impossible to replace in the event of an emergency.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2018
  36. WILL

    WILL Guide

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    My bug out bag for off-grid survival is simply my back-packing rig with some added tools. I'd add a firearm, ammo, bit of oil, trap or two, Tenkara fishing set-up, small sharpening stone, bow saw & spare blade, Leatherman wave & a fixed blade. Heavier than normal, but manageable.

    I agree with bugging in as plan A. However, we had a wild fire come out of nowhere and rapidly close on our neighborhood a few years back, so you'll never hear me say bug-outs can't happen. We had less than 5 minutes to grab what we needed. My off-grid survival bag was left behind in exchange for items that made more sense for that situation. We got lucky and the wind changed direction, but that event affected the way my family thinks.
     
  37. K7JLJ

    K7JLJ Tracker

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    I'd love to hear what they were and if they could have been in a BOB ready to go?
     
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  38. JAY

    JAY Guide

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    for information only. LOL. I found that a USGI canteen cover works perfectly for a single 110 Conibear trap
     
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  39. WILL

    WILL Guide

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    Without getting into specifics, we’ll say irreplaceable items followed by high dollar items. For example, a rocking chair passed down from my great, great, great grandfather.
     
  40. K7JLJ

    K7JLJ Tracker

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    Thanks, I'm working on my EVAC plans again today and pre-staging or listing items to take. You comment has me looking for irreplaceable items now to add to the list.
     
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  41. WILL

    WILL Guide

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    We also compiled a pair of lists after living through that. Items we would want to take in an evacuation are spread out all over my house and garage. In a rush and under stress it can be easy to overlook an important item. I did a room by room check list of vital items for both on & off grid emergencies. Those are two very different lists as we'd probably be staying in a hotel and filing an insurance claim for one and on our own for a while with the other.

    Off grid example-

    Kitchen-
    Canned & dried food
    Cast iron cookware
    Dutch oven Cook Book
    Pressure cooker
    Canning gear
    Canning cook book
    ect.

    You can see that I could fill up my truck pretty quick either way. When you make the list, put the most important items in each room first. That way, if you're in a time crunch you go strait to them.
     
  42. blind & lost

    blind & lost Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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  43. Uncle Duke 520

    Uncle Duke 520 Scout

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    Ya know what nobody lists in their BOB ?
    Extra underwear. Yup.....
     
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  44. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    If I'm bugging out, I'm going full-on commando. Yup...
    :4:
     
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  45. Red Wing

    Red Wing Supporter Supporter

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    Think he was trying to say conceptually youd need similar gear if you had to be mobile AND carry some resources. Backpacking makes good practice. If those 3 million people dont backpack I dont have to worry about them competing with me for resources. They wont cover the same ground as me.

    I'm in Cbus as well.

    FFT. Spec ops use quite a bit of commercial style backpacking gear. Canadian spec ops bought 200 windshirts from Luke's Ultralight. Salomon jungle boots. Patagonia fleeces.

    Every BOB should start with carrying it 10 miles, which is an easy day by backpacking standards, and seeing how you feel.

    Also grey beard green beret did a great video on these concepts recently.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2018
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  46. caoutdoorsman

    caoutdoorsman Scout

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    Great points guys, your thinking with respect to your personal info is spot on. I will post a full report of my evacuation from Paradise eventually when work obligations are taken care of (tons of paperwork to deal with through December).

    My emergency suitcase is a large, waterproof hard case with important documents, extra clothes and a basic stock of OTC medicines (Benadryl, Caffeine & Tylenol tablets). I intentionally left a space to fit my computer tower in the event of an evacuation because it contains important work documents, and threw it in right before I left. I live a fairly minimalistic lifestyle, so I was not concerned about saving all that many of my possessions - only those that could compromise my financial well-being if looted.

    The point on loading up a vehicle is an interesting one and something I had considered in advance. My work-pack contains all of the documents and electronics needed for my employment, and my suitcase described above takes care of everything I was concerned about in terms of identity protection in the face of looting. My work truck already contains two cases of water (summer job-assignments are in very rural locations with 100+ temps, water is an essential) and extra food, so I was squared away on that front. I didn't want to have to pack more than two bags in order to save time in case of a fire, which ended up benefiting me greatly when the fire happened.

    Loading up too many things is a hazard to be avoided at all costs - I left relatively early with respect to many other evacuees, but was still stuck in traffic for 30 minutes due to the chaos, and in slow moving traffic for an additional 30 min. Leaving early is the best option when SHTF, and I saved a lot of time by being alert and leaving when I did. It took only a few minutes to unplug my PC tower, throw it in my prepped suitcase and put it and my work pack into my vehicle. I spent more time filling in neighbors with the information I had available about the fire, and telling them to leave than I did packing. Had I not warned them, I likely could have left before the fire was in town and circumvented hitting traffic, but during the situation I felt compelled to convince them to leave.

    Motorcycles are excellent vehicles for evacuations - you can split lanes in traffic and bypass traffic jams, and you'll evacuate much more quickly because of this mobility advantage. I was passed by numerous fat guys on Harleys and a few hicks on dirtbikes while stuck in traffic, and envied the speed at which they breezed through traffic. I will be getting my motorcycle permit when I have enough money for a street-legal dirtbike. Dirtbikes also have the ability to off-road, which can help circumvent traffic jams caused by panicked motorists crashing their vehicles.

    3-5 days of supplies is plenty, although I would err on the side of 5-7 being preferable. Lots of the gear we think we'll need is unnecessary; when living out of a vehicle and hotels, I found low-prep food, hygiene items, water, clothes, sleeping-bag and money are the most helpful things to have.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2018
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  47. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    Photo very similar to my conclusive bug out bag and vehicle, out my front thTUNY3A3A.jpg door and a 3 mile paddle down to a small island with no gas worries and pushes/pulls easily when iced over.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2018
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  48. LostViking

    LostViking Supporter Supporter

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    @Ptpalpha

    I'm in your corner. I have been up and down the evolutionary scale with this. From Knife and Canteen (I was Seven), to 70 pound load out (Mid Twenties), to my current set-up (Staring 60 right in the face).

    Knowing you're in Michigan prompted me to respond. Mostly because of the weather extremes we both face. As I type this on the day after Thanksgiving. It is -9F. Temperature, not wind chill. What works for a lot of people/places, simply will not cut it for us.

    But I am with you on keeping it simple, as light as possible and within the realms of sanity.

    I have come to view my needs not by what I call the event. But instead what I will need to do during or after it. Camping or Bugout, Backpacking or TEOTWAWKI,

    For me, it comes down to this. What will I need to do?
    Stay warm?
    Stay dry?
    Hydrate?
    See at night?
    Ingest calories?
    Go to the bathroom?
    Clean up a bit?
    Build a fire?
    Cover some ground?

    When I view it in this perspective.
    There really isn't much if any difference, between camping and bugging out, or getting home. With the possible exception of self defense.

    I set the SD category off by itself. Because again it is location specific. Suffice it to say. You should have a method to protect yourself. Whether it is from a rabid beaver, an angry moose, or MS-13, will dictate how you handle that.

    I arrived at this conclusion some years ago. It was actually in a grocery store. I was tired, and in need of bread and toothpaste. As I stood there in the toothpaste isle. Staring aimlessly at the myriad of brands and flavors, whitening, fresh breath, sensitive teeth labels.

    I thought to myself, "I just need toothpaste! Don't they make plain tooth paste any more?"
    When I was a kid. We had two choices. Colgate or Crest. That was it, ballgame over.

    The bread isle was much the same. Numeric grain counts ranging from three to twelve. White, wheat, rye, raisin, oat, pumpernickle, gluten free, Italian, French, Jewish, Mexican, Greek, Arabic, Seeds, seedles, soft, crusty, and on and on.

    I thought to myself, "Crap man, I just want a loaf of bread!"

    That tidal wave of choice and options has infiltrated every aspect of our lives these days. All with the purpose of giving you options and removing money from your wallet.

    Bug out bags, Get home bags, Go Bags, INCH bags, are all basically the same. Options for you to choose from. Often times expensive options.

    A 3-5 day hiking/camping trip has almost the exact same requirements as bugging out or walking home. I won't bother to retype the list above.

    I'm willing to bet. If you got stranded while camping/hiking. You could stretch out your supplies to extend a 3-5 day trip out to a 6-10 day trip and not die. You might not be comfortable or happy. But you would pull through.

    It could be said that "Bugging Out" (I hate that term) is open ended. And for the most part, I agree.

    But since we are leaving vehicles out of it. Or at least for another thread. It still boils down to what you can comfortably carry for 3-5 days.

    Obviously for Michigan as well as here in the Adirondacks. The July load out will look very much different than the January load out.
    Or even the Thanksgiving load out.

    If you're hiking and or camping with your gear, you are way ahead of the pack. Because you are familiar with how it all works, and the strengths and weaknesses inherent in the gear.

    Simple gear that you have used and tested, will serve you much better over the long haul than some eighty pound zombie apocalypse bag full of unfamiliar stuff. That may or may not be better than what you camp with on a regular basis.

    Camping and hiking is or should be, low stress. Bugging Out, by definition, probably won't be. So being familiar with your gear and being able to utilize it in high stress situations will come in very handy.

    I say you are 100% on the right path.
    LV,
     
  49. LostViking

    LostViking Supporter Supporter

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    @Seacapt.

    I had to chuckle when I saw this!

    Here is mine
    [​IMG]

    As I said above. A lot of this is area specific. This particular method probably won't work well in the Bronx or the desert southwest.

    Mine even has one of those anti theft devices!
    [​IMG]
     
  50. Seacapt.

    Seacapt. Supporter Supporter

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    Yessah, we're both fortunate for sure, a hell of a lot easier to "bug out" or just plain getaway by water than by road, few if any others will even know your on your way.
     
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