My get home bag

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by Jason, Apr 24, 2018.

  1. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    I work between 30-90 miles from home regularly and don't generally wear clothes suitable for outdoor trekking in any climate so I like to keep a few things with me. Saw an inspiring thread about another GHB so I figured I'd list what I carry. It all sits in a Kelty Redwing 44 in my trunk and changes slightly based on seasons. I figure I can probably get extra food before people realize what's going on so I don't carry a lot of it. If I'm 30 miles away I probably only need the right clothes, shoes, and a water bottle but 90 miles away can be problematic. I’ll add some pictures as I take them.

    B3BA04EB-E541-4A4D-92DA-1F64F231783F.jpeg

    Front Pocket
    Waterproof notebook
    Route map

    Lid
    6 Cliff bars
    Poncho (Bushcraft Outfitters Enhanced MEST)
    Ditty bag:
    Spork
    Streamlight microstream (no battery)
    Fenix light small (no battery)
    6 AAA batteries
    Firesteel
    Trioxane tab
    Sandpaper (for sharpening)
    Bic lighter
    Sunscreen
    DEET
    Vaseline tube
    Cotton balls
    Paper towels
    Gorilla tape
    Pencil

    Side Pocket 1
    Fallkniven F1
    Leatherman multitool
    Silva compass
    Line kit (12/6/3’ lengths about 100' total)
    SOL mylar bivy
    Belt
    Bandana

    Side Pocket 2
    First aid kit
    Tourniquet
    Israeli bandage
    ACE bandage
    4x4 gauze
    Mastisol
    Steri strips
    Moleskin
    Neosporin
    Alcohol swabs
    Nail clippers
    Safety pins
    Dental floss
    Chapstick
    Camp soap
    Bandaids
    Toilet paper

    Main Compartment
    Waterproof breathable bivy (SOL escape bivy)
    Silnylon OD brown 10x10 tarp (Bushcraft Outfitters)
    2 one quart water bags (Sawyer)
    Stainless water bottle
    Water purification tabs
    Nesting cup
    Lifestraw
    Mosquito head net
    Clothing:
    Wool socks (weather appropriate)
    Baseball cap
    2-T-shirts
    2-Underwear
    Thermal polys/balaclava
    Leather gloves
    Wool gloves
    Wool hat
    Merino wool hoodie
    Long Pants
    Waterproof jacket/pants
    Poncho liner

    I also keep Winter boots when appropriate and goretex hikers.

    Go ahead and tear me apart I won't be upset at all but if you randomly get banned I have no idea what happened. :9:
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2018
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  2. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    PICTURES! PICTURES! :p 'cause bag dumps are so much more interesting with visuals :D
    :40::40:
     
  3. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    I know I know I’ll get to it one of these days. I’m scheduled to do a seasonal update this weekend that would be a great time for it.
     
  4. NJHeart2Heart

    NJHeart2Heart Backyard Bushcrafter Supporter

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    I'll be waiting with "bated breath".. I am also doing a bag inventory (daypack, bushcraft, GHB).. Partially done.. need to finish it up and link to the google slides I created :)
     
  5. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    Totally kidding about the banned thing, really, mostly. I’d like to see othe GHB’s if anyone else wants to post them.
     
  6. Noblesavage

    Noblesavage Tracker

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    Weight? Paper towels in place of TP? I'd ditch the Lifestraw, and get a Sawyer Mini. Keep the Kelty loaded as a three season bag and a second compact bag with the cold weather gear in the car. Take or leave out the CWG depending on the season.
     
  7. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    Good idea on having a secondary bag for cold weather gear. I had a sawyer mini and changed it for the life straw for simplicity but you have me questioning my decision. I’ll try to remember to get weight when I get pics, it feels light enough for me to carry compared to the previous versions I had.
     
  8. sons of scotland

    sons of scotland Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    maybe i missed it but i dont see a big chopped/hatchet in your kit, i keep a spec8 ontario in mine. good for building a shelter and processing firewood and just a great all around ghb/survival blade. solid well thought out kit though.
     
  9. rustystove2017

    rustystove2017 Supporter Supporter

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    ...think about a small camp mirror if there is not currently one in your FAK- well worth it if you need to examine your eye or face if need be.
    Cliff bars are good- I started carrying KIND bars- they have one that is carmel almonds and sea salt that is super tasty.
     
  10. jackpine

    jackpine Fire? I don't see any fire!?

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    Extra socks, foot powder, separate your booboo items from major trama and have bleed out kit on top. I’d add some nut butter packets too and a few caffeinated items
     
  11. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    My thoughts: It looks good. I kind of err on the side of a lot (too much) stuff with the theory I can leave behind what I don't need for the exact circumstances. Since my GHB lives in my car, daily weight isnt an issue. In reality, my EDC bag is a lighter version of my GHB.

    I didn't see a phone power bank or a small radio. Contact and info can be an important part of choosing a route through a disaster.

    IMO, almost as important as the contents is a schedule for maintenance and replacement. I switch out the fall/winter stuff for spring/summer (and check food, batteries, FAK, etc.) in April. I go the other way in September (National Preparedness Month.)
     
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  12. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    @Unistat76 So true on the maintenance aspect! I update every April and September and have a checklist for what I’m supposed to do at each time of year. I even put some Vaseline on my firesteel because they tend to rust and develop pits over time. It also helps me stay familiar with the contents and forces me to re-evaluate over time, interestingly I seem to make at least minor changes almost every season.

    Regarding communications I’m admittedly weak on that. Something I should look at.

    @jackpine great idea on foot powder that would be very useful

    @rustystove2017 I have a mirror on my compass
     
  13. Wasp

    Wasp We are GO for Sting! Supporter

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    I'll ban em, I got your back. I keep my ban hammer warm. ;)

    Sounds like a nice kit and good reasoning to me. Pictures sometime if you feel like it, I know its a pain.
     
  14. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    The list looks good. I am saving it to do a proper review... :p

    Oh, yes, maintenance is a big issue. I carried two huge pelican cases with gear for us to ‘get home’ in the back of my truck. I decided to look inside... and found a disaster. Seems a couple of bottles of water had leaked, causing a real mess.
    Now, we have decided that:
    1. We are normally home
    2. If we get stuck in SLC, the only place we go, we are done. None of us could walk anywhere meaningful. So, we rely on our packed gear for the normal 2 to 3 day trip, with extra food always along, and the fuel in the tank in the van.
     
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  15. POGEYBAIT

    POGEYBAIT Supporter Supporter

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    Great post. We need some pics.
     
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  16. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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    Hi Jason, you didn't specifically mention where you roam, but a handy thing to carry in anyplace that has civilization, is a 4-way outdoor faucet wrench (sillcock key). Practically every fast food joint/bank/grocery store has an outside water faucet, with no handle. Even if the SHTF, any place with a water tower will have water pressure with no electricity, until it goes dry. Five or six bucks at your hardware store.

    If it's appropriate, it's easier than filtering a mud puddle.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Keyser Söze

    Keyser Söze Usual Suspecto Lifetime Supporter

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    replace all your shoelaces with paracord, leave it couple of feet longer and double up on the knots!!
     
  18. Noblesavage

    Noblesavage Tracker

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    Sillcock key would be good addition. The only reason I say change the life straw for the Mini is that the Mini can be used as a straw, but Lifestraw does not filter water on the go or filter the water in your bottles. So you have to drink your fillwhen you find water and/or carry dirty water with you. Mini is just better IMO.
     
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  19. Capin JRo

    Capin JRo Scout

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  20. Harper

    Harper Bushmaster

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    I would include:

    1. Rehydration Drink powder.

    2. Shemagh. Lots of uses.
     
  21. dub

    dub Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    List looks good and a couple of good suggestions in the comments as well.

    Route map is good. Surprising how many people go to the hassle of having a GHB but haven't actually planned a route home.

    Maintenance is huge. Love the idea of keeping cold weather gear in a separate bag. One less thing to switch out

    My goal is to keep moving. No shelter building or cooking.

    It's about time for the changeover. I need to go through mine. Maybe I'll post up too.
     
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  22. JAY

    JAY Guide

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    My set up is for day hikes, If I find myself in an overnight situation, I have no shelter. only a USGI poncho, and space blanket. as far as cooking, I don't. everything is grab and eat, Jerky, nuts, dried fruit, cliff bars, My canteen has a cup under it in case i want a hot cup of coffee, or tea. If I'm fortunate enough to catch a critter it can be cooked on a spit over the fire. I seem to be always going through my kit so as to make it lighter. I use a Frost River haversack, and have another older haversack in case I have need of warmer clothing, or extended trip gear. my water is over the opposite shoulder, and not in my main pack. My only question to the OP is why the paper towel, I carry tp, without the cardboard center with individual hand sanitizers, and a bandanna or two for other jobs.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2018
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  23. oathkeeper762

    oathkeeper762 Bushbum & PT Wanderer Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Well thought out kit. I would also recommend you consider swapping the life straw for the sawyer mini as mentioned by @Noblesavage. IMHO, for the value proposition, the Sawyer is hard to beat. I have tried more than a dozen different water filters and I still highly prefer the Sawyer. It’s light, adaptable, and with its ability to screw directly on many disposable plastic water bottles it is hard to beat. Check out the YouTube videos on Sawyer Mini Filter Mods for more ideas. Just a note, I’m not sure about your local conditions but I live in an area with high sedimentation contents in the surface water so I also carry a Pre-filter, a milbank bag, and Polar Pure to extend the life of my filter.

    I see you have a couple lights listed, but I would consider adding a quality headlamp. Being able to work with both hands free is a huge advantage in the field at night whether your hiking, cooking, or doing camp chores. If weight is a concern, a single CR123 or AA/14500 model from a quality manufacturer like the Olight H1 Nova, Olight H1R, Thrunite TH-20, or the Zebralight H52w are all good lights. If you don’t mind the larger 18650 batteries, I love the Armytec Wizard Pro.

    A shemagh is also a great multiuse item. I use mine on every outing for a variety of tasks such as catching your fire prep shavings, carrying firewood, as a foraging bag, as a dinner prep area, a giant hand towel, it keeps me cool in the summer by wetting it down and wearing it on my head and neck or warm in the winter used the same way. It can be used for first aid as well. A great piece of kit with a multitude of uses.

    I also carry a firebox Nano titanium stove. It is light weight, incredibly efficient, and lets me keep my fires to a minimum. It fits in my Mother canteen kit in the inside small back pouch. I know many say to travel light and no cooking in a GHB but I’m a Boy Scout and you may not always be able to get home in 72 hours plus I keep my bag with my truck at all times and I use it frequently for short outings and day trips to familiarize myself with my gear and to test my kit contents in non-emergency situations. This practice alone has helped me refine my gear over the years. YMMV.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2018
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  24. Nakadnu

    Nakadnu OBSERVER Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I like the fact that you do not leave batteries in your flashlights. I have had more than one device ruined because of leaky batteries and also no chance of an accidental discharge.
    Good list of First Aid as well.
    I also noticed you don't carry a firearm with 1,000 rds. As long as there are no Mad Max Soccer Moms running rampant you should do OK though.
    Thanks for sharing.
     
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  25. JAY

    JAY Guide

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    I vote also on the Sawyer Mini, although I didn't care for the bag that comes with it. I bought the CNOC water bag to replace it , It fills far easier, and packs tighter, in my opinion.
     
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  26. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

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    umm, I like your choice of knife...

    :4:

    haha. anyway, first, define your disaster - civil unrest? earthquake? Russian EMP, broken fuel line? plan accordingly...

    second, if you're 90 miles from home in civilization, a handful of cash or valuable things (watches, jewelry, laptop, etc.) will do more to get you home than anything you can carry on your back.

    you are carrying 2 t-shirts, 2 underwear? wool gloves and leather gloves? why? people hike for months at a time and don't carry that much. spare socks - good.

    2 lights similar size and function? why? at least make one a headlamp. spare light with similar batteries - good, but the only reason I would choose AAA is weight. otherwise, I would choose AA as they are more available and have longer run time, or if you have a weapon, I would choose the same batteries as my weapon light...

    first aid is always going to be a vigorous debate but I tend to provide for trauma and let duct tape take care of the rest. tourniquet, Israeli, Pri-med gauze, eye wash, pain meds, Benedryl, Immodium, disinfectant, sunscreen, duct tape wrapped around an expired credit card - good.

    now, some of this stuff is my EDC (first line), and some is what I always have in the car (second line). I think of these as layers so my third line (Get Home Bag) doesn't duplicate, it only supplements what is already available to me.

    remember, this isn't a camping trip. the plan is to get home any way you can as fast as you can. run lean, run fast, cheat and take chances...
     
  27. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    @ra2bach the spare undies are for when I soil myself :dblthumb:
     
  28. reppans

    reppans Scout

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    A 30-90 miles get-home is huge if walking.... how about tossing a folding bicycle in the trunk? It'll quadruple your pace/range for the same amount of effort. Also great way to get around urban areas where parking is a hassle and/or costly.
     
  29. southron

    southron Guide

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    there is two things I always bring up with these type things.

    One. Use every bit of it where / in similar areas to where you may actually need it, evaluate if it helps you and is worth hauling with you.

    two. Actually try to cover the distance you think you may have to cover. Note what you may really wish you had and don't. I suggest having a cell phone and someone who can come pick you up.

    Just a 30 mile road march is a huge chunk of distance, esp if things are sporty or grubby. It can end up taking a lot longer than just walking down the road.

    OH, and feet, take care of you feet, socks, shoes, blisters, etc. Your feet are your life when you have to make a forced ruck march.
     
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  30. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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    My normal GHB is also a vehicle bag. On a daily basis, I am 15 miles from home, on an interstate. Easy walking, unless the going gets tough. I drive through some rock cuts, so it's also a winter "stay in the vehicle until someone finds me kit" if all of the bad possibilities happen (crashed the vehicle, phone dead, can't walk, etc). I keep cold weather gear outside the bag, take if needed.

    If you are planning on walking, a good way to store TP is remove the center cardboard tube. Wrap some (or a lot) of duct tape around the outside (because: more duct tape!), pull from the center. Keep it in a ziplock. If you get all wet, you know your TP won't be mush. Full roll, or a half a roll, whatever you think you will need.

    Also consider vacuum-sealing some things. Socks/undies/tshirts/gloves suck down real good, and take up much less space. Make sure they are very dry. If you get cold/wet, the promise of dry socks/undies/tshirts/gloves lose appeal, if they are damp and moldy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2018
  31. woodsmanjohn

    woodsmanjohn Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Looks like a great kit Jason covers allot of bases, allot of great suggestion here as well. Cool post buddy, makes me want to update my on truck bag..
     
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  32. Skotelawe

    Skotelawe Guide

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    Stop using alkalines batteries. Use rechargeable NiMH (Eneloops etc) in items you use regularly around the house.

    For items used infrequently or in storage use lithium primaries (Energizer Ultimate etc). They have a much longer shelf life.

    Both types are lighter than Alkalines & more importantly they don't leak.
     
  33. atlastrekker

    atlastrekker Supporter Supporter Bushclass III Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Here is something that I would recommend, take it for what it's worth. Take it out of your trunk, put it on your back, do an overnighter with it, take some pictures and most importantly post the results in the outings subforum!

    Drills are what prove your theories right or wrong.
     
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  34. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    I’ve recently started walking with it during my exercise. It’s not 30-90 miles but I do carry it for 45 minutes 3 times a week. Doing that has has reminded me to add a fistful of ibuprofen in case I need to carry it a real distance.
     
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  35. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Supporter Supporter

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    sidearm? or compact longarm? i suppose either would not go in the actual bag, but reserve ammo might ...
     
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  36. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

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    and... you can trade it to some friendly person with a vehicle to give you a ride...
     
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  37. JAY

    JAY Guide

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    Trade my gear for a ride. NEVER, NEVER, NEVER
     
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  38. Tangotag

    Tangotag Field Gear Junkie Supporter Bushclass I

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    What is the total weight?
    Could you get by dropping 50% of the weight with only absolute necessities? (Like a re-evaluation of gear needs before departing vehicle)
    My thought being the more ultra-light the easier and faster necessary distance could be traveled.
     
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  39. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

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    are you sure you understand the concept of a get-home-bag?..
     
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  40. Jason

    Jason Founder Staff Member Administrator Vendor

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    Firearms info intentionally left out, assume that I'm OK in that department. My assumption is also that the roads are not passable or there are no working vehicles available. Otherwise I'd just get a vehicle and get home that way. I also have plans to secure a bike asap before most people figure out what's going on, I can't carry a bike with me all the time. I'm not walking unless I absolutely have to. As far as thinning down the weight of the bag yes that's something that can be done as needed but I won't be able to take away too much if it's negative 10 and snowing, if it's mid summer I can drop quite a bit. The majority of my weight is clothing and shelter. Also the clothing in my bag is meant to replace my normal work attire which is totally inadequate, so I will be changing into what's in the bag as soon as I know I need to start heading home.
     
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  41. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

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    roads not passable or no working vehicles? ok, so you're describing TEOTWAWKI?

    so what is it, some sort of disaster apocalypse similar to Cormak McCarthy's The Road? riots and social unrest? Red Dawn type foreign invasion? zombies?..

    personally I can't envision a circumstance that would place me within 2-5 days walk from my home that wouldn't involve roads and cars and contact or interaction with people. that's why I said a pocketful of cash or shiny trinkets will do you more good to get home than a ferro rod and tinder.

    your shelter/sleep gear need not be heavy - I'd want a free standing tent about 2.5lbs, an insulated mattress @ 17-20oz, and a 20* down sleeping bag right around 2.25lbs

    as for clothes, I would work the layers. even a business suit will provide warmth if layered with insulation and weather proof shell...
     
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  42. Grizzly Dave

    Grizzly Dave BCUSA Friend Bushcraft Friend

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    I have a bag that has car stuff, ropes , water , blankets, a pot with tea coffee etc. and soup & food bars
    Then if I am going far from home and may have to crash at a friends or a hotel I have a change of clothes and a bit of survival gear and I can take my car knife etc. if I am using it as a GHB.
    I work an hour downhill from where I live 1100 feet ASL to Sea level it's a slow walk home
     
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