Need some leather help.

Discussion in 'Monthly Projects' started by jchal3, Aug 27, 2014.

  1. jchal3

    jchal3 Tinder Gatherer

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    Hello im new to this forum, and notices a lot of you guys do leather work. Well...I have a pair of boots that are incredibly confortable, and I really like them a lot. The problem is that my dog liked them more.

    What are the chances they can be salvaged, and what is the chance one of you would like to take on the project? uploadfromtaptalk1409182852977.jpg uploadfromtaptalk1409182863668.jpg uploadfromtaptalk1409182876472.jpg
     
  2. Exy

    Exy Bushmaster

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    Jesus man.. what kind of dog?

    Get that sucker a raw-hide chew toy or something.

    But as per your question.. are the boots still made?

    The time and effort/labor that would go into that would definitely air on the side of probably not worth it. But perhaps I'm being too negative.
     
  3. Pastor Chris

    Pastor Chris Hardwoodsman #7 Hobbyist Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass II

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    I would check with the manufacturer or a local cobbler about having them fixed. Most better footwear can be rebuilt by the manufacturer. Other than that, a cobbler might take on the job. And Exy says, it might not be worth the trouble. Sometimes such things are opportunities for something new. And yeah, get a rawhide chew toy for your dog.

    Welcome to the forum.
     
  4. jchal3

    jchal3 Tinder Gatherer

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    They are red wings and they are still made. I know its a shot in the dark, but man I love them boots and they were not even a year old.
     
  5. stingray4540

    stingray4540 Scout

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    Well if you liked how comfy they were and they were broken in, it might be worth fixing them. But if it's simply a matter of money, it would probably be worth just buying a new pair, but I'm no cobbler so...

    I would reiterate what others have suggested. Talk to a local cobbler, and redwing, but I have a feeling redwing would just want to replace them.
     
  6. Todd Bradshaw

    Todd Bradshaw Banned Member Banned

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    As a former Vasque/Redwing dealer I can remember them replacing boots with problems and being very generous about it, but I never, ever saw them repair one. A good boot is a pretty complex construction and the pieces need to be assembled in a very specific order to work right, and even just to be able to access the various areas with the sewing machine. The combination of all the required disassembly and working with used leather is enough for any manufacturer to take one look at those and say no. Even a shoe repair guy (who realistically has no chance of being able to make them even close to being like they originally were) is probably going to tell you to buy a new pair and not waste your money trying to fix them, so I think you're going to be out of luck on these and a new pair is probably cheaper than even a poor repair.

    This one is kind of like having a sheet of plywood with a bad middle layer and trying to replace that layer. Simply not practical or economically feasible.
     
  7. MarkW

    MarkW Scout

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    I see your boot and I am reminded about reading back in elementary school about airmen shot down over Germany in WW2:

    [​IMG]

    DAYTON, Ohio - Flying boots were a telltale sign of an airman. Equipped with a knife in the bootstrap, these British-made boots appeared to be common walking shoes after the upper portion was cut off. This item is on display in the "Winged Boot: Escape and Evasion in World War II" exhibit in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)
     
  8. jchal3

    jchal3 Tinder Gatherer

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    I hear taps playing in the distance haha
     

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