Outdoor Research Ferrosi Jacket/Windshirt?

Discussion in 'Clothing' started by The Woodsrunner, Oct 30, 2018.

  1. The Woodsrunner

    The Woodsrunner Possum Hobbyist

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    In light of @mtwarden's thread on windshirts: https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/in-praise-of-the-windshirt.221379/ I am on the hunt for a quality windshirt that won't break the bank and is in a low key muted gray/brown/green

    So far, I have narrowed it down to probably an Outdoor Research Ferrosi hooded jacket. Just curious if anyone on here has had any experience with the jacket or any of their other products in the Ferrosi line?

    Here is the jacket in question: www.outdoorresearch.com/us/en/mens-ferrosi-hooded-jacket/p/2500941352007
     
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  2. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    I have one (in coyote) :)

    it's on the more weather (wind/precip) resistant end and less on the breathable end; I wouldn't use it for trail running or any other high aerobic activity, but for general hiking and the like, it works well.
     
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  3. The Woodsrunner

    The Woodsrunner Possum Hobbyist

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    Ah, excellent! That is what I needed to know.

    We have enough rain here in Ohio, that I will probably be better off with something a tad on the more weather resistant end. Just as long as it is closer to the breathable end of the spectrum than a straight up rain jacket.

    Plus I don’t run, lol.

    Is the fabric decently durable? It says 70d and 120d ripstop, but as a fabric geek, I know that could mean a wide range of actual weight/durabilities.
     
  4. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    almost all of my other windshirts are really lightweight, so the OR definitely is heads and shoulders above them; overall I'd say pretty darn tough

    OR also has what is arguably the best warranty of any outdoor gear manufacturer; if the jacket were to tear where it shouldn't- they'll replace it
     
  5. Watcher of the Woods

    Watcher of the Woods Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    That jacket looks sweet! I have the Patagonia Houdini which is lighter, more breathable, and packs down smaller, but I don't think that it's close to as durable.
     
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  6. geologist2

    geologist2 Supporter Supporter

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    I have one and love it. Sheds light rain and super packable.
     
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  7. The Woodsrunner

    The Woodsrunner Possum Hobbyist

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    Excellent on both accounts. Thank you sir! You have been most helpful.
     
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  8. The Woodsrunner

    The Woodsrunner Possum Hobbyist

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    Gotcha. Yeah, I do prefer a bit more durability. Those are pretty sweet jackets though!
     
  9. The Woodsrunner

    The Woodsrunner Possum Hobbyist

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    Awesome! Sounds good.
     
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  10. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Aw jeez, more choices. Here I was all committed to getting the level 4 shirt, but my Midwest brother from Ohio raised some key issues: durability and weather shedding, both of which are high priority here in Michigan.
    Heading to the OR site to check out this one.
     
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  11. Ptpalpha

    Ptpalpha Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Hmm... after reading the reviews in the OP's link it looks like this one needs to be tried on to make sure the fit is right. Seems that OR has tweaked the design since the previous models; just a heads up.
     
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  12. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    the other thing with the OR, it has a lot of stretch in it- I think that can be good in certain instances, but when you stretch fabric it also is more likely to let moisture in at the point where it's being stretched; also will be slower to dry
     
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  13. Ragman

    Ragman Supporter Supporter

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    I have the Ferrosi Hoody and use it a lot. In fact I wore it yesterday over a base layer on a very windy hike.
    When looking at and comparing garments I always look at the weight difference, that tells you a lot.
    If your looking at similar jackets in similar fabrics the heavier one will almost always be warmer.
    BTW the Ferrosi pants are nice as well.
     
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  14. Watcher of the Woods

    Watcher of the Woods Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    You guys sold me on it... Have one on the way.
     
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  15. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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  16. draugur

    draugur Supporter Supporter

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    I just found this thread so I'm jumping in kind of late but as I'm considering getting a soft shell, I have some questions about this jacket. How does it compare to the Patagonia PCU lvl5 softshell jacket or the Helikon Trooper Jacket? The are all predominately nylon, 86%NY/14%Span for the OR, 98%Ny/2%Span for the Heli and I'm not sure about the Pata but probably somewhere close to the others. The only Patagonia ones I can find right now are in the $150 range on Ebay, but the OR is on sale for about $95 and the Heli can be had for $99. I'm curious if there is something specific to the design or utility of the Patagonia ones that justify spending the extra cash on. Any feedback about this would be greatly appreciated!
     
  17. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    the level 5 jacket is true softshell, the OR Ferrosi (and the Level 4 stuff) are windshirts- lighter, not designed to provide warmth other than what they hold in (and keep weather out)

    I don't have any first hand experience with the level 5 jacket- never really saw the need; a light fleece + windshirt = a superior combo and one that the pieces can be separated
     
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  18. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    "Softshell" typically means a "wind-proof," water resistant jacket with integral fleece insulation.

    E.g.: Northface MEN’S APEX CANYONWALL JACKET
    PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS
    Style:
    NF0A3SOD
    Avg Weight:
    544 G (19.2 Oz)
    Length From Center Back:
    26.75"
    Front Body And Pocket Exterior:
    150D 306 G/M² WindWall®—100% Polyester With Brushed Fleece Backer And Durable Water-Repellent (DWR) Finish
    Typical features of softshell jackets
    . . .
    • Inner Fabrics
      The inner of a soft shell is usually lined with a fleece, fur or wool, but can vary according to price.

    By that understanding, the ECWCS Level 5 is not a "softshell, but merely a stouter wind shirt - an uninsulated shell that helps stop wind and precipitation - although the military calls it a "softshell."

    Confusion in labeling need not be important if you know what you need and what the garment supplies. The traditional "softshell" is heavier and less flexible in use than the Level 5 Jacket.
     
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  19. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    the level 5 has no lining whatsoever? funny they would include both a lighter windshirt and a heavier windshirt
     
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  20. RiceOnSuede

    RiceOnSuede Scout

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    Ive got enlightened equipments wind shirt and it fits great, weighs less than 2oz, and fits scrunched up in my fist. Adds a surprising amount of warmth.
     
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  21. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    No lining whatsoever. The L4 is lighter (less durable) and stuffs much smaller but, within limits, does the same job - resisting wind and precip. They are what were once "wind breakers." The idea, knowing yourself and the AO, is to match the clothing to the mission.
     
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  22. draugur

    draugur Supporter Supporter

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    Ahh I see. Cool, thanks guys.
    @TAHAWK I was looking into the pcu layering system more and the lvl 5 gear was meant to be worn in place of regular bdu/cammies for inclement weather. I guess that's why they are just unlined, more durable versions of the lvl 4.
     
  23. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    I have exchanged messages with people familiar with the L5 jackets and it seems there must be many iterations. The ones I was told about were lined with polyester mesh, this makes a lot of sense in certain climates as it aids vapour transfer and provides some dead air space at the same time. I have a warm-up top from Puma Sports like that and it works very well
     
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  24. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    ^ that's what I thought as well, that there was more than just a single layer of material- thin mesh, micro fleece or what have you
     
  25. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    TM 10-8415-236-10 0002 0002-5
    DESCRIPTION OF MAJOR COMPONENTS (OUTER SHELL [sic] LAYER(S)) Outer Shell Layer(s)
    The outer shell layer(s) (Figures 4 thru 7) are the external layers that protect you from the elements in your environment. They are made of a highly water and wind resistant material that provides greater moisture vapor transfer over current hard shell garments. Their main function is to keep you dry. In addition, they provide additional volume for trapping body heat. Increased breathability improves performance of the insulation layers by decreasing saturation due to moisture vapor accumulation. These layers should be worn comfortably loose. The Wind Cold Weather Jacket (Figure 4), Soft Shell Jacket and Trousers (Figure 5), Extreme Cold/Wet Weather Jacket and Trousers (Figure 6), and the Extreme Cold Weather Parka and Trousers (Figure 7) are the components that make up the outer shell [sic] layer(s).

    DESCRIPTION OF MAJOR COMPONENTS (OUTER SHELL LAYER(S)) - Cont
    Wind Cold Weather Jacket: Outer Shell Layer
    The Wind Cold Weather Jacket (Figure 4) [Level 4] is made of a lightweight, wind resistant, and water repellant [sic] material. It acts as a minimum outer shell layer, improving the performance of moisture wicking of the insulation layers when combined with Body Armor and/or Army Combat Uniform. Use for wind stop protection during windy cool days. This layer features a simpler collar instead of a hood, a hook and loop fastening system for name tag, rank, and US Army emblem placement, as well as pockets designed with mesh linings to aide in ventilation.

    Soft Shell Jacket and Trousers: Outer Shell Layer
    Soft Shell Jacket. Jacket (Figure 5) [Level 5] features a storable hood, shoulder pads with a hook and loop fastening system for name tag, rank, and US Army emblem placement, adjustable cuffs, underarm zippers, pockets designed with mesh linings to aid in ventilation, and an extended tail on the jacket to provide overlap to prevent snow from entering the system. Soft Shell Trousers. Trousers (Figure 5) feature detachable suspenders (compatible with all trousers), front pockets with flap, drop seat capability, thigh cargo pockets, articulated knee, adjustable ankle cuff, and side zips on the lower leg to provide access when donning and doffing boots."

    Full specification: http://ciehub.info/spec/PD/GL-PD-06-05B_2015-03-09.pdf

    Level 4 jacket ("Wind Cold Weather Jacket") weighs half as much as Level 5 jacket ("Soft Shell [sic] Jacket")

    NOTE: Level 5 is not specified as including insulation, unlike the traditional "Softshell."
     
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  26. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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    ^ nice dig! :)

    must simply be a heavier fabric (ie more durable) jacket/pant; which makes sense if you think about low crawling through a combat zone, etc
     
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  27. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Guide

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    So the new jacket really isn't a "Soft Shell" at all as most people would understand it. Perhaps the earlier versions were simply too expensive to make or were not versatile enough? I would guess that cost would be a greater factor in D0D thinking just as it is down here.
    From my own use the mesh layer helps a lot and if I am making something like this I would be lining with an appropriate mesh, perhaps even 2 layers of mesh with different properties. For me performance would be far more important than cost but from a manufacturing POV a liner doubles cost.
    From an historical perspective the drop liner was why the M-65 Field Coat was so effective in most situations. I guess that the term is now being used to distinguish the L-5 from the waterproof "Hard-Shell" L-6
     
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  28. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    The Gen II garment was also an uninsulated shell.

    I think you are right: it's "soft" to distinguish it from the "hard" Gore Tex shell of "Level 6."
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
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  29. Nightflyer

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  30. Leatherneck

    Leatherneck Tracker

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    Recently picked up a Kale/Hops OR Ferrosi jacket. Would likely have preferred the Coyote, but got a better deal on the Kale one. It's main body is OD Green with lighter green arms. Pleased with how light it is compared to my Patagonia military MARS Dimension soft shell. The light green color on the arms isn't as bright as sometimes pictured online either....which I like.
     
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  31. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    It is suggested by some (Twight for one) that in cold weather, especially when active, the "wind shirt" be worn over layers one and two und under layer 3 to create a "microclimate" that prevents evaporation - and the resulting cooling - next to the skin. Since the "wind shirt" is semi-permeable, it allows moisture to pass into more breathable outer layers. Waterproof fabrics have no place it this system except in serious rain and wet snow.
     
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