Packing list for week long trek?

Discussion in 'Backpacking' started by CoolBreeze135, Mar 2, 2018.

  1. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    Hey folks!
    I've been backpacking for a while, but almost always 1 or 2 nights per trip. I just don't have the opportunity to get away for more than a couple days. However, I'm taking off some time at the beginning of this summer to do a week long backpacking trip with a good friend. I've gotten my gear list pretty optimized by this point, but since a whole week is kinda new territory, I thought I would seek some input from the forum. I know there are a few thru-hikers around here, and several people who have done extended backcountry trips. Would you mind checking my gear list and giving me input? I'm sure I'll be debating a couple items until the night before I leave, but it would be good to get some opinions now so I can ponder it for a good long time.

    For your info: I'll be going to New Mexico near the beginning of June and hiking in the southern part of the Sangre de Cristos at some decently high elevations. It's unfamiliar area, but I know the weather can be a bit unpredictable at that time/elevation, so I want to err on the safe side when it comes to warmth/protection from elements. Items in red are things that I am considering removing.

    backpacking list.PNG

    I'd appreciate any advice!
     
    Guy, Sbrody, Dukejb and 11 others like this.
  2. Hunt4lyf

    Hunt4lyf Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    3,528
    Likes Received:
    8,958
    Location:
    Colorado
    I've never been down to the Sangres in New Mexico but I've roamed all over the Sangres in Colorado, these are my thoughts by column

    Shelter:

    I often take the least amount of stakes for my shelter to make it work properly and if I need more I just make them there, saves a few ounces.

    Clothing:

    I don't carry any extra clothes, I wear a quick drying shirt and carry a lightweight merino thermal to change into as needed if I need to dry my shirt by the fire or for extra warmth. Same with extra skivvies, I've never carried any, I just clean the pair (no soap, just scrubbed out in the water) I'm wearing and let them dry.

    Will you be taking a puffy or something? Is that what the lightweight pullover is? I always carry a down puffy I got from Costco just to use at camp, it can get well below freezing up high in the beginning of June.

    Tools:

    I kinda think that a fixed blade isn't needed unless you just want it to make curls or split bigger pieces into smaller, I sometimes carry a Mora (3 oz) but I almost never use it, I tend to use my little SAK much more. Same with a multi-tool, I've never carried one and have never needed one. Trowel? Just use a stick and save the weight. Glock? You wont need it BUT I carry mine on every trip I go on, it's worth the piece of mind to me.

    Cooking/Purification:

    I never use a fork, just a spoon or sometimes a spork just because that's what I get from whatever fast food place I'm at. Nalgene bottle is way to heavy for what it is, get a comparable Gatorade bottle, it's about 1/3 of the weight as a Nalgene. The Sawyer mini, IMHO, sucks for longer trips, honestly I think it just sucks period, the Sawyer squeeze, while heavier allows much better flow and can be used as a gravity filter when in camp to fill your bottle/pot/whatever. I always feel dehydrated when using the mini, I just can't get enough water out of it.

    I always carry some aquatabs, they take 30 minutes to work and you can use them on the go and are nice to have if your filter takes a dive.

    What's the fry pan for? Fish? Better to carry a bit of foil or just pin them on a stick over the fire, I think a fry pan for fish is just way to messy for what it is.

    Ti bowl? What are you using it for? I've never used a bowl, I just dump water over my food in a Ziploc and eat it right out of the bag.

    Stove? I always carry a stove of some sort, often times it's an esbit stove just for warming water, don't count on using a fire all the time, you could be to tired, the wood could be sopping wet and hard to light OR you could be under a fire ban which means you would probably need a stove with an on/off valve.

    Grill? Just push a couple rocks together.

    Misc:

    Take the notepad or use your phone for notes, I take notes all the time and it's cool to be able to look back and see what you've forgotten.

    Hygeine:

    Wet wipes are awesome!!!

    About it from me but remember that there can be snow up high anytime during the summer, I was fishing in pouring snow the end of july last year and it happens quite often. Don't wear cotton because it takes forever to dry, wear quick drying clothes, no matter what you do to stay dry if you're walking through wet willows you're going to get wet.
     
    colter, Swineflu, Not Sure and 11 others like this.
  3. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Messages:
    1,366
    Likes Received:
    4,662
    Location:
    NYC
    Is your buddy bringing gear? Make sure your not duplicating stuff he may be bringing
    Think top and underqilt are not nesseccary there in june
    I would re evaluate that
    Maybe substitute a sweater of sorts instead
    Trowel? I never used one, sticks work fine
    Wetwipes? Just extra weight
    Can always wet a dry napkin or tp
    Hand sanitizer? Unless your friend has the cooties i would drop that
    Sponge? Use tge bandana instead
    See your dropping the stove. Fire bans are something to consider. Are stoves allowed there during fire bans? That may be a last minute decision
    Pillow? I would use clothes in a sack instead

    Remind me to never eat from hunt4lyfs bowl
     
    isme, Bobsdock, woodsmanjohn and 3 others like this.
  4. mtnoutdoors

    mtnoutdoors Prov 27:17 Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2014
    Messages:
    4,659
    Likes Received:
    17,951
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    I really have not done a long trip like this but I would really take the wet wips. Did not see anything about how you well be transporting your food and what you well be taking. Make sure you got plunty of stuff to take care of your feet. An can't wait to see the trip report on this trip. Good luck and bee safe. Prov 27 : 17
     
    isme, Bobsdock, woodsmanjohn and 2 others like this.
  5. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    Thanks for the replies! Your input was very helpful when I went to CO a couple years ago in June. I'll try to keep my replies as organized as you kept yours.

    Shelter:
    I always bring only 4 stakes, which is exactly the number I need to set up my tarp as a rain fly for my hammock.

    Clothing:
    I rarely bring extra clothes, but a week seems like an awfully long time to wear the same t-shirt and underwear. I always wear the ExOfficio underwear and a polyester shirt, which are better than cotton but still need to be changed every 3 days or so (IMO). For warmth, I am bringing an ultralight merino layer (the pullover, which is really more of a base layer) and a puffy vest (I have one down one and one synthetic one, and I'll bring one or the other). I don't think I need a jacket, but the vest is going for sure. I will definitely re-evaluate the extra clothing. Fresh socks are definitely coming along, though.

    Tools:
    The "multitool" is my SAK farmer. Honestly, it will probably do most everything I need, but I never go to the woods without a fixed blade. It's both for my enjoyment and peace of mind. I plan to do a bit of bushcrafting too, as we aren't planning to be on the trail all day every day. We should have plenty of time in camp to fish/explore too. It will be a pretty light fixed blade, but that's one part of my kit that's not negotiable. My trowel is only 0.6 oz, so it seems worth its weight. That way, I don't have to find a good digging stick if the urge hits suddenly. Plus, it has a couple other uses like picking coals out of the fire, etc... I often leave the Glock at home for hiking trips, but am leaning towards bringing it at this point. Of course, I don't expect to need it.

    Cooking:
    I have a spoon/fork set that converts to tongs. It is incredibly useful as a set, so I'll probably bring the whole thing. Usually, I just bring a spork, but these new "Titongs" from Toaks will probably replace that. I'm really into backcountry cooking, so I err a little heavy in that department. I agree that oil works great for fish. However, I also want the skillet for hash browns (one of my favorites to re-hydrate and fry) and bannock. The grill will stay at home most likely, though it is excellent for cooking trout or a steak (I may bring a frozen one for night #1 to start the trip off right, but I can always cook it another way). The Ti bowl will stay. It's a useful little piece to have at a little over 1 oz, but I agree that it isn't really needed.

    I'll look into replacing my sawyer mini with the squeeze. I also usually carry some Aquamira drops as backup.

    Fire bans or wood shortages are a concern, so I will probably bring my Trangia stove.

    Misc:
    I will try to take notes along the way, so the note pad may be a good idea. I prefer it to my phone when jotting things down.

    Hygiene:
    Yes, wet wipes are amazing!



    You know the weather and conditions in those mountains pretty well. My main two questions for you are: 1) Are hammock spots guaranteed, or would you also bring a ground pad just in case (would also like @NM_Coyote to chime in)? and 2) do you think a think merino layer, a puffy vest, and a wind shell will be sufficient?

    Thanks again!
     
    isme, NM_Coyote, Bobsdock and 3 others like this.
  6. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    Are you a hammock camper? Quilts are pretty much necessary year-round, especially in the mountains. If its less than about 70-75 degrees in the middle of the night, you will get cold in a hammock due to the draft. At 10-13k feet out west, it can get much much colder than that in the middle of the summer. Heck, even out here in the east it can get cold enough at night to make you uncomfortable if you don't have insulation. And that's coming from someone who is a very warm sleeper.
     
  7. Hunt4lyf

    Hunt4lyf Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    3,528
    Likes Received:
    8,958
    Location:
    Colorado
    Honestly, I thought your list looked just fine, I just kinda nit-picked it but if you took all that I think you'd be just fine. If you're using synthetics then yeah, you'd probably want to swap them out, mine get pretty funky after a couple days. I carry at least 2 pairs of socks, at least, but I'm in the water a lot fishing so they get pretty rank quick. As to the jacket I'm going to say you may want one, I can tell you that after X# of miles in a day, you're burnt out, sweaty and a bit chilly, the outside temp is 38 deg and you have all your dry clothes on, a warm puffy feels good, my cheap Costco one weighs 10 oz. The beginning of June could still be winter at the elevations you'll be at, knee deep snow and ice capped lakes OR it could be 70 during the day, 40 at night and zero snow, hard to tell until you're there.

    I hear ya on the fixed blade knife, I like to have one also but then I fight with myself because I don't normally use it, I just like to have it "in case". All I normally carry is my little SAK and if the trowel is that small you might as well take it, same with the bowl if it's only an ounce and you might use it.

    As to the Sawyer mini I've just been seriously underwhelmed by it but many others love it, just always filter your water, I got Giardia a year ago and it was about the most miserable experience I've ever had.

    A trick with wet wipes is to let them dry out and when you need one just "reconstitute" it with a little water, it helps to drop a little weight, I typically take 2 per day, it feels good to wipe off some of the sweat before going to sleep and they help keep monkey butt to a minimum.

    Does your trangia have an on/off valve? If there are fire restriction a lot of times it required to have a stove with an on/off valve. There isn't normally a wood shortage unless you're in a high use area.

    I agree with Terasec on the pillow, I just stuff something in my quilt stuff sack and that works fine for me.

    And to answer your last 2 questions

    1. It depends, if you're close to timberline hammock spots can be hard to find as the trees are smaller and in the Colorado Sangres that I roam there is a terrible die off of trees, both pine and spruce, and perfect looking camping spots could be really dangerous if a hard wind comes up, perhaps one of the New Mexico guys could answer that question better than myself.

    2. For me, I carry a merino thermal, a puffy jacket and a wind/rain layer no matter the time of year. I love to use a vest but if I'm trying to cut items then I carry a puffy jacket and leave the vest. That's what I carried last year on a 4 day trip that was constant rain and I was always wet and a dry merino thermal and down jacket were like heaven at camp when I'd put them on, also a good beanie is great to have, I prefer to have a balaclava that I can fold up and use like a beanie.


    What's a bowl? ;)
     
    Dukejb, isme, HeadyBrew and 4 others like this.
  8. Beach Hiker

    Beach Hiker Traveller Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Messages:
    3,374
    Likes Received:
    20,933
    Location:
    On the farm and at the beach.
    That list looks pretty much perfect.
    Did you put a hat on there? I love me a good hat. Can also be worn at night for warmth.
    I would lose the trowel and make a digging stick (since you will have the tools).
    Looking forward to the report.
     
    Bobsdock, rsnurkle and CoolBreeze135 like this.
  9. TheRambler

    TheRambler Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    420
    Likes Received:
    476
    Location:
    CT
    Re wet wipes- if your really trying to save weight let your wet wipes dry out and then at clean up time pour some water on one and they are good to go, even nicer with hot water.

    Definitely bring your under quilt or some manner of bottom insulation or tou will be miserable.

    I would ditch the extra tshirt. You have the baselayer to wear as an extra if u need it. You can easily wash your tshirt, bringing an wxtra is just dead weight.

    Oh, and keep the sanitizer. Especially if its a small travel size one. Only reason to ditch it is if your carrying soap.
     
  10. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Messages:
    1,366
    Likes Received:
    4,662
    Location:
    NYC
    I hammock camp in pa and northern ny
    Closest thing to a quilt i have is a thin pad that has some insulating properties
    In summer i dont use a top quilt nor a sleeping bag
    In early spring and fall i use a sleeping bag
    I am fine down to about 60
    Expect 50’s then i may bring a sleeping bag liner by itself
     
    isme likes this.
  11. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns

    Thanks again for more great info!

    My Trangia has the simmer ring, which counts as an on/off valve as far as I know. If it doesn’t, than I’ll bring a canister stove most likely.

    The pillow is my luxury item. Sleeping well is of the utmost importance to me, and a pillow makes that possible. I got an aeros inflatable pillow from sea to summit for Christmas, and it is very small and light.

    I’ve been a little underwhelmed with the sawyer mini as well. It’s pretty slow, but it is so much smaller than my old pump that is still my go-to filter for now.

    My buff can be used as a neck gaiter or beanie, so I have that covered.

    My biggest debate is whether I should leave the underquilt at home and bring a closed cell foam pad instead, so it can be used either in a hammock or on the ground in case it’s not possible to hang.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2018
    Bobsdock, rsnurkle and Hunt4lyf like this.
  12. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    I’ve gotten cold in July hammock camping, but at 6k feet in elevation it can easily get down to 50 in the middle of the summer. If I only camped at low elevations it would be a different story. I am pretty comfortable at 65 F without a sleeping bag or quilt, but I never go on a trip without one. Especially not out in the Rockies where it can get under 40 F in June/July. The only time I go without some kind of insulation for my back is summer in the south at low elevations.
     
    Bobsdock likes this.
  13. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    I always have a hat. It will be on my head the whole time, so I didn’t put it on the packing list.
     
    Bobsdock likes this.
  14. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    Yes, going without an underquilt or pad would be foolish, considering the location.

    I’ll also keep the hand sanitizer. It’s a tiny travel size bottle, and I just like having that around to clean my hands after doing my business. I also bring about 1/2oz of soap, which is primarily for doing dishes.
     
    Bobsdock likes this.
  15. Hunt4lyf

    Hunt4lyf Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    3,528
    Likes Received:
    8,958
    Location:
    Colorado
    No problem.

    The squeeze is just a couple ounces heavier than the mini and well worth it I think, the flow rate is substantially better vs the mini.

    I'm really no help with the quilt vs pad since I've never hammocked before. I will say its rare to not have trees around to hang from, most of my camps it would be possible, it's just that with all the dead timber it could make it sketchy, with ground sleeping I can go into more open areas or above timberline and camp. Again though, this is in my areas I frequent, I don't know a thing about down where you will be but I do know that the tree kill is all over the west.

    I started carrying this a couple years ago and its great, saves multiple trips to get water and makes dowsing a fire easy.

    https://www.amazon.com/Sea-To-Summit-Folding-Bucket/dp/B0029VXAV4
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2018
    Bobsdock and CoolBreeze135 like this.
  16. Bobsdock

    Bobsdock Still going Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2017
    Messages:
    3,196
    Likes Received:
    18,242
    Location:
    Shell knob mo.
    Wow your living the dream brother !
    If it where me, I would defiantly take the down jacket that @Hunt4lyf mentioned above. June can be cold at altitude an extra warm hat and gloves couldn't hurt.
    I would also take the stove & extra fuel you may need it to melt snow for water.
    Beware of thunder storms they are killers at altitude !!!
     
    CoolBreeze135 likes this.
  17. Lichen

    Lichen Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2011
    Messages:
    3,920
    Likes Received:
    8,418
    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    For a whole week, I would suggest a pack mule or a couple of sherpas.
     
    CoolBreeze135 likes this.
  18. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    16,899
    Likes Received:
    20,546
    Location:
    In the woods
    Not much difference between overnight and a week, outside food. How much 'extra clothing' one takes is a matter of practice and personal tolerance, but i try to minimize it and wash en-route. Wear something else in the meantime. Synthetics rock for this reason (quick dry).

    Packing list looks good, but I'd bring a comb. Nothing feels better than combing your hair morning and evening after a full day/night of "hat hair".

    Wet wipes are good unless you can bathe, but handy anyway.
     
    HeadyBrew, CoolBreeze135 and Lichen like this.
  19. Lichen

    Lichen Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2011
    Messages:
    3,920
    Likes Received:
    8,418
    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    If you're hiking in the desert, combs are great for removing cactus thorns. Well, that and a pair of leatherman pliers.
     
    dub, Hunt4lyf and CoolBreeze135 like this.
  20. petey091

    petey091 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2009
    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    109
    Location:
    Ellicott City , Md
    My avitar is of my son and me just below the summit of Trail Peak mountain at 10,250 feet in New Mexicos Sangre de Cristo Mountains. We were there at the end of July. After the picture was taken I also put on my puffy jacket. I would add a puffy jacket to your list. I would also ditch the poncho and add a full rain suit. With your long underwear and puffy with a full rain suit you can make it through almost any weather you will get. I would ditch the folding saw , multi tool , glock, 1 sock , 1 underwear, bowl, fry pan, , grill. I don't know what your water situation will be where you are going but you might want to bring more than a 1 liter capacity. Ditch the Nalgene and use smart water bottles or gator aid bottles. Also pick up a kitchen scale and weigh everthing and look for lighter options. Understand that my reply is based as a backpacker and not a bushcrafter. Ounces equal pounds and pounds equel pain.
     
    CoolBreeze135 and Terasec like this.
  21. HeadyBrew

    HeadyBrew Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,173
    Likes Received:
    6,176
    Location:
    Western NY
    Looks like a good list and sounds like a fun trip.

    As Seeker said, my weeklong list isn’t much different than my weekend load-out. Just more food and water.

    I agree with Hunt4lyf on pretty much everything he said and had the same thoughts re: fixed blade, bowl, fry pan, clothes, etc. If I’m on a canoe trip then I’ll bring a fry pan since fishing is a bigger part of the trip and I can afford the added weight. If backpacking, I’d leave it out. The Ti bowl is unnecessary since you’ll have a pot, just eat right out of that. I’d leave the fixed blade. I’ll admit to always thinking it’s a necessity but will also admit that besides food prep, I almost never use one when I’m backpacking and your SAK will have you covered.

    I’m not familiar with the specific weather/climate but given that you’ll be up in higher elevation and it sounds like hammock spots are not a guarantee, I’d swap out the UQ for a decent pad. Weight wouldn’t be much different, depending on the pad, it might pack a little smaller (my neo-air xtherm pad packs quite smaller than my 3/4 length down UQ for example). You still get the insulation from beneath in the hammock with the pad plus better flexibility if you camp where there’s limited trees and need to go to ground.

    Hope you have a great time and share with us when you get back.

    Re: clothes - for a week, I’ll have two pairs of wool hiking socks (not counting the ones on my feet at the start) and 1 extra quick dry shirt that I swap out and one extra set of undies. I like thin sports shorts (basketball, running, that sort of style). They’re cheap, light, super comfortable to hike in and dry quickly. But I also have and will use the convertible pants also if I’m expecting cool evenings/nights.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2018
    CoolBreeze135 likes this.
  22. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns

    About the rain gear:

    My options are either to a) carry a poncho, or b) carry a rain jacket, rain pants, and a pack cover. A poncho is quite a bit lighter than the other pieces combined, and a bit more multifunctional. I have a larger size poncho that covers most of my legs except to bottom of my shins, which my gaiters can handle. Also, I do not own rain pants (though I have considered buying them several times).

    Just carrying a poncho would save me a lot of weight, bulk, and money. What is your reasoning for a full rain suit instead? I’m open to the option but need a little convincing if I’m gonna go buy rain pants.
     
  23. petey091

    petey091 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2009
    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    109
    Location:
    Ellicott City , Md

    My only reason is that you can use it as a safety suit. When you combine the full rainsuit with your regular hiker wear plus your puffy and long underwear you pretty safe from hypothermia. At altitude it's easy to get caught in bad weather and it's just an insurance policy.
     
    CoolBreeze135 likes this.
  24. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Messages:
    1,366
    Likes Received:
    4,662
    Location:
    NYC
    Full rain suit vs poncho has its pros/cons
    I do reccommend spraying your pants especially knee down with waterproofing spray
    Poncho will soak your lowers and make for uncomfortable hike
    Waterproofing spray will last the week at least
     
    CoolBreeze135 likes this.
  25. Hunt4lyf

    Hunt4lyf Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    3,528
    Likes Received:
    8,958
    Location:
    Colorado
    I do agree with Terasec and Petey about the poncho, it works ok but I always carry and wear a light weight rain jacket, most of the time its to cut the wind which the poncho doesn't do to well. Out here in the Rockies it's actually pretty arid and it doesn't typically rain like back east or the pnw BUT when it does rain it's nice to be able to stay dry. I don't normally carry rain pants but I wear leg waders and the only thing exposed is my hip area and with quick dry pants I stay dry for the most part.

    To be perfectly honest you would be fine with the list you posted (plus a lightweight puffy jacket), this will be your first extended trip into the high country, don't over think it, refine your gear as you can and have fun! I was 18 on my first multi day backpack trip above 8,000, mid-winter, and my pack was seriously 80 lbs, 25 years later for that same type trip my pack is in the 16-18 lb range and summer time trips I'm at 8-10 lbs.
    I still refine little things after every trip.
     
  26. NM_Coyote

    NM_Coyote Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2015
    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    2,781
    Location:
    Tijeras, New Mexico
    Sorry for the delayed response. I have been offline for a couple of days.
    Sounds like a great trip! I wish I was going!

    I would DEFINITELY bring the under-quilt. The highest point in the New Mexico Sangre de Cristos is Wheeler Peak at 13,161 ft. Not quite the 14'ers that are in Colorado but plenty high. Tree-line runs around 11 or 11.5K. It is possible to have snow in July/August and the wind-chill can be much below freezing throughout the summer. (Once had a massive snow-ball fight with friends at the top of Wheeler in August).

    May/June is our dry season so rain and snow shouldn't be too likely. But cool/cold temperatures certainly can be an issue at high altitudes. I always carry a poncho anyway as the weather up there is very unpredictable and it give another option for a wind-proof layer.

    This year we have had much less than the normal amount of snow pack so there are likely to be fire restrictions in June. (Hopefully, not closures, but that is certainly possible.) Make sure you have a stove that is acceptable during restrictions, you may not have the option for an open fire of any kind. (I think the Trangia qualifies.)

    Hope this helps.

    Coyote Ron
     
    CoolBreeze135 likes this.
  27. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    Thanks!

    I’m definitely bringing a warm sleep system. My only debate is whether to bring a top quilt and underquilt, or a top quilt and a sleeping pad. I prefer to hammock, but I know that it isn’t always possible and I like the idea of being prepared to sleep on the ground if need be.

    I really really hope there aren’t fire restrictions while we are there, but obviously I will be planning for that possibility.

    Currently, we are thinking about the Truchas Peak area, and maybe even doing that summit.

    Do you mind if I bother you with more questions via PM over the next couple of months? I find that local knowledge is an invaluable resource.
     
    NM_Coyote likes this.
  28. NM_Coyote

    NM_Coyote Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2015
    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    2,781
    Location:
    Tijeras, New Mexico
    I have never climbed Truchas, but would like to someday. Most of my backpacking has been in the Wheeler Peak Wilderness area to the north or the Pecos Wilderness to the south of Truchas. So I can't give a lot of specific advice about Truchas. But I will certainly answer whatever I can. I know a few others (locals, unfortunately not on this forum) that would know the answers. So maybe I can ask them for you.

    Coyote Ron
     
    BBizy and CoolBreeze135 like this.
  29. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2013
    Messages:
    5,243
    Likes Received:
    20,649
    Location:
    Montana
    looks pretty good, just a couple of suggestions

    if you plan on catching/cooking fish- I concur with the suggestions of a stick or in lieu of a stick, a lightweight grill- a fry pan will be a major pain to clean

    if you're carrying a Farmer, I'd leave the folding saw behind- you don't need much in the way of fire prep for a small fire for cooking

    search for Snotel sites that are near where you are going- check a variety as they vary in elevation, search them for the approx dates to see past temps, it's always going to be cooler at elevation- enough so that you may be better off with a puffy jacket vs vest

    base layers- consider merino or merino blends, much less stink and they still do well moving moisture; if my trips are going to be more than 3 days I always use merino (top and bottom)

    the only "extra" clothing I carry is one pair of socks- these are reserved as sleep socks, I never carry extra base layers- if they get bad enough, as mentioned above- a quick washing will fix that

    I've never found a trowel to be that useful, a stick does just as well imo

    work gloves- are you going to be doing much work? fleece gloves are warm and will protect your hands from minor wood gathering

    regardless- light fleece beanie and gloves, don't leave home without them!

    bug dope?

    bear hang?

    sun screen?

    anti-chafe?
     
    Hunt4lyf, BBizy and HeadyBrew like this.
  30. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    Snotel? I’m not familiar. Is it something awesome I’m oblivious to?

    Around here, I always pack Mechanix work gloves, as I find them to be very useful for keeping my hands from getting cut, scratched up, or burnt while gathering wood, tending to the fire, pulling hot cookware off the heat, etc... They also keep my hands about as warm as any other thin gloves. I find them to be really valuable. I understand they may not be necessary, though.

    I hate sun screen. I’ll probably do without. Clothes and a hat give me about as much sun protection as I want, anyways.

    I usually go without bug spray as well, unless I’m somewhere where they are really bad like the lake country of northern MN.

    I’ll have cordage to hang my pack (or at least my food bag) every night.

    I’ve never used any anti-chafe product. It may be a good idea to look into for a longer trip, I guess. Suggestions in that department?
     
  31. ANFwoodsman

    ANFwoodsman Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,391
    Likes Received:
    2,864
    Location:
    Eastern US
    I didn't see Glide stick or similar on your list. You can get mini sticks of glide that will help with rubbing / chafing on feet, or wherever else.

    I recommend it for long hikes.
     
    CoolBreeze135 likes this.
  32. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2013
    Messages:
    5,243
    Likes Received:
    20,649
    Location:
    Montana
    google snotel map and you will see sites scattered across the western us, they are remote weather stations that record moisture, temps, etc- they are a gold mine of information when going to a new destination

    for anti-chaffing, I like sportslick- they offer them in small tubes- a small tube will do a week or more; it's also anti-fungal
     
    ANFwoodsman and CoolBreeze135 like this.
  33. dub

    dub Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2017
    Messages:
    1,521
    Likes Received:
    5,400
    Location:
    Northern Kentucky
    Definitely a YMMV thing here. I've been using hammocks for years and never used an UQ. A few weeks ago I used a Thermarest ridgerest with two 90% wool blankets in the low 20s and was sweating with wool socks, cargo pants, and an UA short sleeve t-shirt.

    Always hard to give advice on things like this since everyone is different.
     
    Terasec likes this.
  34. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    I should have been more clear. What I really meant is that some type of insulation is needed almost year-round. Quilts are my preferred type, as they are the lightest and most packable. I actually just bought my first UQ. Until now, I've just used my sleeping pad in my hammock. The UQ is just a more comfortable (and maybe more effecient) way to achieve the same goal.
     
    dub likes this.
  35. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2017
    Messages:
    3,705
    Likes Received:
    28,500
    Location:
    Upper Great Lakes
    This might be a stupid question, but do you know if there will always be suitable trees for hammock camping where you'll be at?

    Also toilet paper is optional ;)
     
    Bitterroot Native likes this.
  36. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    I've done a little research. Still wondering if I should bring a sleeping pad in case I have to crash on the ground.
     
    Primordial likes this.
  37. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Messages:
    1,366
    Likes Received:
    4,662
    Location:
    NYC
    also before hammocks were trendy and could be bought in any store
    I used to make my own
    this is one of my early set ups
    IMG_8622.JPG
     
  38. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2017
    Messages:
    3,705
    Likes Received:
    28,500
    Location:
    Upper Great Lakes
    Something to think about. Your ideal camp site might not have good trees and an area with good trees might not be suitable for a camp site.

    I'd also bring a fleece beanie hat. Wear the Buff around your neck to warm your carotid artery and jugular, wear the cap on your head. You'll thanks me the next morning.
     
    billdawg likes this.
  39. HeadyBrew

    HeadyBrew Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,173
    Likes Received:
    6,176
    Location:
    Western NY
    I would really say that this depends on the pad and UQ you are comparing. I mentioned this above but I have a full length thermarest NeoAir Xtherm pad and a 3/4 length down UQ from hammock gear. The pad beats the UQ in packability by a pretty good margin. Weight wise, the UQ may beat the pad but not by a lot. I can dig out my scale when I get home to be sure.

    This is why I recommended the pad. But again, it depends on the pad. I went to an UQ in the first place because my first pad, a thermarest trail lite I think it was, and it sucked in the hammock. Slid all over the place and near impossible to keep underneath me. But later I picked up the NeoAir and on a whim, tried it in my hammock. The material is totally different and is actually quite grippy against the hammock material. Sliding was no longer an issue. Even when I know there are hammock spots, I’ll often bring the pad now over the UQ specifically because it packs smaller and weighs similar.
     
    CoolBreeze135 likes this.
  40. PMSteve

    PMSteve Old Timey Outdoorsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    6
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2010
    Messages:
    8,182
    Likes Received:
    10,051
    Location:
    Relocated to Salt Lake City from Nevada
    From a 1-2 day trip to a full week... just add extra food to your list. When you have what you think you'll need, double it. You'll eat your way through a week's worth of food in three days. Food is really the only limiting factor on an extended hike.

    Take an extra knife or two. They're always needed.

    When you get back, make a list of everything you took, but didn't use at all. It will be linger than you think. Use this list to pare down your equipment for your next trek. You will continually lighten your load as you do away with unused stuff that you thought you'd really need.

    When I started backpacking, I did this. I cut my pack weight from around 50# to just under 20# not counting food. It was a considerable savings.

    Steve
     
  41. ra2bach

    ra2bach Bushmaster

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2014
    Messages:
    5,297
    Likes Received:
    7,233
    Location:
    ATL
    sorry, not picking on you but I'm going to disagree with just about everything here...

    1. I've never hiked where OP is going but here in the East you need your TQ and UQ even in summer. in fact, I'd go winter weight on the UQ. - you never know what elevation will throw at you - the coldest night I EVER spent was in early June hanging behind the Overmountain Shelter on the AT...

    2. starting at the skin and adding as it gets colder, my 3-season uniform is 2pr Darn Tough socks - wear one wash one, 1pr stretchy synthetic boxer shorts and 1pr thin UNIQLO polyester long underwear - wear one wash one, ultralight polyester t-shirt, 250wt 3/4zip long-sleeve Smartwool sweater, bandana or neck buff, $10 Target fleece, puffy vest, hard shell. this is mix/match, add/subtract as you prefer. a wind shirt can substitute in there somewhere.

    obviously winter or deep summer require different weight garments but don't underestimate how quickly things can change at elevation...

    3. I like a trowel. when I want to go, I want to go, and you need to bury your poop under 6" of earth. how many inches of poop are you going to put in that hole?..

    the TP gardens in evidence along trails are because too many people think a stick or your heel works just as good.

    I use this - 87grams, $1.39 - https://www.fleetfarm.com/detail/fi...WqcMkBGed0JXiFFHBmklycXSEiUQRBDRoCry0QAvD_BwE

    4. Wet Wipes? awesome. carry them dry and wet a couple at a time. get the biodegradable ones please...

    5. Hand Sanitizer? indispensible... does anyone remember the thread I did, "10 Things You Need Hand Sanitizer For"?..

    6. Eeeeeew, you would mop your brow with a dirty greasy bandana?.. maybe I'll use it to grab a hot pot lid or handle but my bandana is only for me and my skin. I carry these for clean up - fractions of an ounce, synthetic and anti-microbial. rinse easily, won't hold food, and won't stink - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00VJKI89U/ref=od_aui_detailpages00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    7. I agree on the stove but you don't have to use it every day. you could carry a super light alcohol stove or even just throw a few Esbit tabs in a pocket and stack a couple rocks. of course fire regulations would prevail but still, I'd have something for that third day of torrential rain when everything is soaked and all you want is your cup of Hot coffee/cocoa/bullion/Ramen RIGHT NOW!

    8. Kinda agree on the pillow. I don't use one in my gathered end hammock but it's essential in a bridge or on the ground and chasing a slippery clothes bag that keeps sliding out from under my head all night long gets old real quick. an small inflatable pillow inside an unused t-shirt or fleece is a lifesaver...
     
    CoolBreeze135 likes this.
  42. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns

    I closely agree with you on pretty much every point, Ray. Thanks for chiming in.

    Try the Deuce of Spades trowel at 0.6 oz. I got one for Christmas, and I haven't had to use it yet, but it sure is easy to carry. It really pisses me off to see toilet paper thrown on the ground in the woods. If you want to go live in the woods for a couple days, you gotta learn some basic skills to facilitate that. Burying your dung is high priority on that list.

    I always pack a pillow. A good night of rest is so important to me, and a pillow makes all the difference.
     
    NM_Coyote and ra2bach like this.
  43. Hunt4lyf

    Hunt4lyf Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    3,528
    Likes Received:
    8,958
    Location:
    Colorado
    @NM_Coyote I'm curious what, if any, the beetle kill looks like in New Mexico? It's all over Colorado with the pine and spruce beetles and a lot of great camp sites aren't useable because they're surrounded by hundreds of dead trees.

    This is one little basin in the Sangres here in Colorado, there is the most perfect campsite right in the middle of all that dead timber. I'd say at least 75% of the trees in there are dead from the spruce beetle.


    35147012264_962a1cbbb7_o.jpg
     
    CoolBreeze135 and NM_Coyote like this.
  44. Terasec

    Terasec Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Messages:
    1,366
    Likes Received:
    4,662
    Location:
    NYC
    hate hearing that
    one of my favorite camping experiences was in CO sangre di cristo range, just outside westcliff CO
     
    CoolBreeze135 and NM_Coyote like this.
  45. Hunt4lyf

    Hunt4lyf Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    3,528
    Likes Received:
    8,958
    Location:
    Colorado
    That's exactly where this is, it is sad to see and can make it hard to find a good campsite.
     
    CoolBreeze135 and Terasec like this.
  46. NoBrakesRacing

    NoBrakesRacing Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2014
    Messages:
    452
    Likes Received:
    1,188
    Location:
    Grapevine, TX
    Good luck with the trip.
    As an arm chair backpacker and occasional camper I like to day dream through other people's adventures.

    I would like to see a whistle and second flashlight plus batteries on your list. For when the first one falls on a rock.
     
    BBizy and CoolBreeze135 like this.
  47. NM_Coyote

    NM_Coyote Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2015
    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    2,781
    Location:
    Tijeras, New Mexico
    We do have areas that get hit. And of course those become a real fire hazard as well.
    At our last gathering @WhisperInThePine gave a tree lecture. I think he said that the beetles are pretty much native in our area but invasive to Colorado. They get worse when its dry and the trees are weakened. And they can be transported to new areas by people bringing in firewood from other areas.

    I can remember seeing large areas here of forest that were dead from beetles back in the seventies and thinking "What a shame that those bugs have to act that way. :2:" But now I'm kind of thinking maybe this is nature's way of countering our tinkering with the natural fire cycle. I do know that part of our fire danger is caused by over-supression of the healthy role of fire in the life-cycle of the forest." We supress all fires so that the natural thinning doesn't happen until it overgrows to the point that it is catastrophic. Fortunately the policy has changed to mimic the normal, healthy role of fire using controlled burns. But right now we have overgrown forests and drought conditions, so when it gets bad, it's really bad. Sorry, enough philosoapafizing! :58: (That's philosophizing on a soap box for those not in-the-know.)

    But yes, the short answer is that we do have areas that are pretty hard hit by beetles.

    Coyote Ron
     
  48. WhisperInThePine

    WhisperInThePine Wubba lubba dub dub

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 28, 2013
    Messages:
    2,381
    Likes Received:
    4,814
    Location:
    Colorado
    I did use invasive in reference to round headed pine beetle, and it's a gray area whether that term could be used for round-head in our area. Perhaps uncommon would be a better term. Western spruce beetle, Douglas-fir tussock moth, which are in the Sangre de Cristos are native. WSB is the most widespread and damaging defoliator in the west.
     
    NM_Coyote and Hunt4lyf like this.
  49. Hunt4lyf

    Hunt4lyf Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    3,528
    Likes Received:
    8,958
    Location:
    Colorado
    Great answer, thanks!

    I remember reading about a decade ago that people here in Colorado were concerned that the aspen would disappear in the not to distant future because of fire suppression and then a couple years ago I read another article about how in a lot of the beetle kill areas how the aspens are coming up once all the needles have fallen off the dead timber and let the sunlight in. I believe you're right about nature always finding a way no matter how much tinkering we humans do. I've seen this first hand in some of the areas I hunt/fish and areas that were pretty much barren of large animal sign are now covered up in in animal sign.

    WSB is what I was told is doing the most damage in the Sangres right now, I'm sure you know but whole drainages are dead.

    A question for you @WhisperInThePine I was told several years ago that the most dangerous time for forest fires in the dead timber is while the dead needles are still on the tree and that the danger diminishes some once the needles have fallen off. Any truth to that?
     
    NM_Coyote likes this.
  50. CoolBreeze135

    CoolBreeze135 Scholarly Woodsman Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    22,822
    Location:
    East TN, Smoky Mtns
    Same here! My favorite overnight trip ever was just outside of Westcliffe in the Sangres.
     
    NM_Coyote likes this.

Share This Page