Paracord vs. Bank Line

Discussion in 'General Bushcraft Discussion' started by Averageiowaguy, Oct 6, 2012.

  1. Averageiowaguy

    Averageiowaguy Guest

    Blog Posts:
    0
    One of the items on the gear list for the Amazon 5000 expedition was bank line. I had no idea what it was so I looked it up at the link provided. It is basically just tarred twine.
    [​IMG]
    The advantages touted for bank line are that it is supposed to be more resistant to the environment, petroleum products etc than traditional twine. Because I've been using paracord for so long, I elected not to purchase the bank line and instead bring my usual assortment of paracord lengths. With all new things I am very skeptical until I see the evidence myself. I did not want to be using bank line for the first time in the jungle and have it not fit into my system.

    As I found out, the expedition uses a TON of bank line and for good reasons. It is used for making traps, for fishing line and in any of the roles in which you would use paracord. The first time I used it was as guy lines for a tarp. We had camped on a sandbar in the Amazon and I rigged up a makeshift tarp/mosquito net shelter.
    [​IMG]
    I still used my 30' length of paracord for the ridge line. Old habit I guess. As the trip wore on, I found myself really liking bank line.

    The main advantages I see of bank line are:
    1) The #36 bank line has a breaking strength reported at 340 pounds. This is about 62% the reported breaking strength of paracord.
    2) While you sacrifice a little in terms of strength, bank line takes up FAR less space in your pack and weighs less. You would have to decide for yourself whether or not you would utilize more than 340 pounds of breaking strength, but I typically do not unless repelling is involved. In the case where I would need more than 340 pounds of breaking strength, I tend to use real rope.
    3) In my limited experience, the knots are less bulky and seem to hold better with bank line. The difference could be in my skill level at knot tying.

    Anyway, I thought it might be something to look at and see if it might fit into your system.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 7, 2012
  2. hitrekker

    hitrekker Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 7, 2012
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Quebec, Canada
    I prefer bank line, or tarred nylon as I know it, over paracord. As you stated, with a minor compromise in strength, it is at least as versatile as paracord while taking up less space and weight in the pack. As far as strength, I figure one could always braid a few strands if needed.

    My only two small complaints are that a new roll tends to leave my hands a little tacky and new line has a petroleum smell. Fortunately, these issues fade away quickly after only a few uses.

    I buy mine from a local marine supply store. Really great stuff!
     
  3. Two Bears

    Two Bears Banned Member Banned

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2010
    Messages:
    1,778
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    Florida
    I have come to prefer the bank line over paracord. If you need a stronger line you could always brade a couple or a few pieces of bank line together.
     
  4. DeriusT

    DeriusT Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2011
    Messages:
    920
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    SW Ohio
    I have used the "bank Line" for awhile now. I use it in a few different sizes. I use the #36 for most camp tasks, and it can be very easily split into 3 separate strands without all the trouble you get with paracord. I also carry about a #12 or #15 I can't remember offhand. It's about 110lbs or so, and breaks down into much smaller threads. I use it alot for sewing things, and other tasks. Much better than inner paracord strands for sewing things. Love the stuff. I get mine at http://www.memphisnet.net/category/twine_tarredseine

    Much better prices. Not all twine is created equal. It's all in how it's treated. The walmart stuff is vastly inferior to this type of twine made for marine use.

    (But I still carry some hanks of paracord too. Old habits die hard) :4:
     
  5. Tech

    Tech Solo Craft Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,529
    Likes Received:
    2,136
    Location:
    'Zona
  6. crookedknife

    crookedknife Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Messages:
    1,377
    Likes Received:
    75
    Location:
    Kodiak Island, Alaska
    This is exactly the same line used here for making and repairing commercial fishing gear. The tar is not for durability but for holding a knot. When repairing or rigging gear the local guys will sometimes tie several thousand knots in an 18 hour day - an amazing process to watch. They have to use simple knots that hold well, and the tar helps. Another advantage is that the tarred line stretches less than paracord.
     
  7. jim.bell

    jim.bell Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Messages:
    199
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Louisville KY
    I love my tarred line. I have been thinking about building a rope machine to twist up some three strand. Don't know why, just what I have been thinking about.
     
  8. Crco

    Crco Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2010
    Messages:
    761
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    N.E. USA
    For many baseline cordage needs in a typical North American bushcrafting session .... I can see a mix of 50% bank line and 50% paracord being a good outlay for a typical kit.

    Between the two varieties of cordage, you have a ton of versatile options.
     
  9. Longbeard

    Longbeard Continental Drifter Bushclass III

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2012
    Messages:
    6,216
    Likes Received:
    3,723
    Location:
    Iowa
    +1 Crco. I carry both as well. Same reason I have more than one size blade I guess.
     
  10. MiddleWolf

    MiddleWolf Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2011
    Messages:
    3,389
    Likes Received:
    410
    Location:
    Pacific NW
    All of a sudden I'm looking at bank line, Hmmmm.
     
  11. moa_shooter

    moa_shooter Christ Follower Supporter Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Messages:
    961
    Likes Received:
    733
    Location:
    Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    I purchased mine from Gander Mountain. Do you guys melt the ends of yours like you do with paracord?

    Sent from my LG-E400R using Tapatalk 2
     
  12. Ned

    Ned Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2012
    Messages:
    942
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    Canada
    Paracord like Duct Tape is one really overhyped product embued with the mystical properties in popular culture as the indestructible katana sword in anime, which can cut down a brick wall. It's very important to have good strong cordage, but it doesn't matter if it's bank line, paracord, or natural hemp twine. I've found over the years that I find much more use for the longer-wearing properties of electrical tape than I ever did for duct tape, which is supposed to be the do-all tape. 100 mph tape of course is another excellent alternative.

    Paracord is great, but there are so many alternatives which are also great, that I never did understand how paracord raised to the cult status that it has. I use it and love it myself, along with an assortment of other cordage which I use and love.
     
  13. hitrekker

    hitrekker Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 7, 2012
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Quebec, Canada
    I haven't had the need to since I find the tar keeps the threads together pretty well
     
  14. rdec

    rdec Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    2,901
    Likes Received:
    126
    Location:
    Rhode Island
    The cordages I usually have available are:

    several 50' lengths of 7mm nylon kernmantle accessory cord usable for emergency rappelling, ridgelines and other uses where substantial line is needed. (I don't free-fall rappel anymore - if I did I would use 10-11 mm dacron static line). I also have 50' of 4mm nylon kernmantle accessory cord I use for shallow-slope rappelling as well as ridgelines.

    various lengths of 550 cord for general use.

    #18 tarred bankline for lashings and light use.

    Artificial sinew or dental floss, also #69 nylon thread for light lashing and sewing.

    I also pack 30' lengths of light braided nylon decoy line I got in Rhode Island but never found again in survival and repair kits. This makes very good lashing material.

    I carry all types in the truck kit, but select a few types for the walking/canoe packs depending on what I have in mind.

    Lashing is something everyone should know how to do. It's simple and allows you to quickly assemble fairly complex structures from saplings or small diameter logs. At various times I have made camp kitchens for base camps, tripods for hanging a pot over the fire and even 10' towers (haven't done that in awhile, though).

    FWIW: back in the day we used 2" surgical adhesive tape (duct tape hadn't been invented yet) for repairs and simple box hinges and 1/8" cotton sashcord for our light cordage. These still work well (rub the adhesive tape - or duct tape for that matter - with the warmed bowl of a spoon to secure the patch. Cotton sashcord still works for guylines and such BUT be aware that cotton cord shrinks when it gets wet, so it's a good idea to loosen the guys slightly if there is any chance of rain lest the shrinking cord pull the stakes out of the ground. Hemp cord, hard to find nowadays, also works. Hemp is the dacron of the natural world with almost no stretch which is why it was used for the standing rigging on sailing ships.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2012
  15. WldWldWest

    WldWldWest Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2012
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Nashville T.N.
    I have been using Tarred nylon for many years and have a spool in my truck and my pack (It will stain in high heat anything it touches) and have never met anyone else that uses it. It will hold up to the elements for a very long time. Kinda funny story, Went with a friend to haul some tree saplings and he didnt have anyway to tie down the tarp so I let him use my tarred nylon he didnt have faith that my "string" would hold the tarp for a 200 mile run on the interstate...well about two years later he called me from the ER while he was waiting to be treated for a cut to the bone on his index finger, a loop of the tarred nylon was hanging off the trailer and he thought he would grab it and snatch it off...didnt work out well for him. We still laugh about it but he always has a spool on hand now!

    The brand at our wal-mart is made at the Memphis plant and I use it all the time.
     
  16. J

    J Bushwhacker Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    13,553
    Likes Received:
    216
    Location:
    here nor there
    100mph tape, is duct tape.

    Paracord is still tops in my book. Because you have 7 times the length in one run with the inner strands, it can be used pretty versatile. Mystic properties, and over hype?? Well, I dont know about that. lol

    Bank line.... Well, to each his own.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2012
  17. cucumberfly

    cucumberfly Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Dubai and Missouri
    Bank line (tarred line) is the bomb cus you can get it at any walmart or hardware plus you get loads of it for cheap! which is great cus then you dont need to worry bout cutting small pieces off for use or getting it dirty. I also find that tarred line has just infinite fray resistance (grain of salt). Love the stuff for drop lines, hand line fishing, jugging, fish threader, game ties, and a hundred other things. Even used it to string my hammock up a couple times (had to double the string over) and it worked great. just give it a try
     
  18. YankeeBushman

    YankeeBushman Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Alton, NH
  19. JC1

    JC1 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    1,253
    Location:
    Alaska
    for 9 bucks you can get 240' bank line in 640# breaking strength
     
  20. Bones01

    Bones01 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Messages:
    444
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Always changing.
    I've used both and one advantage of Bank line in my opinion is that it is more abrasion resistant. At one time it was more readily available than paracord. Since I have somewhere around 14,000 feet of paracord, guess I'll stick with what I have.
     
  21. REDROCKETSGLARE

    REDROCKETSGLARE Tinder Gatherer

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can a kind soul please advise me of the approx 'breaking strain' by the thickness of the twine ?
    Only reasonable UK source I can find, is sold by thickness - Tarred nylon twin in 2mm, 3mm, or 4mm

    http://www.gaelforcemarine.co.uk/36215/Gael-Force-Nylon-Braided-Twine.html

    A rough estimate of maximum load would help me buy the best kind of twine.
    This is the equivilent of about $25 a roll...............

    Thank you

    Rocket
     
  22. Canadian Woodsman

    Canadian Woodsman Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2010
    Messages:
    868
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Eastern Ontario
    I've never seen bankline in real life, is it like nylon mason's line? Is it all sticky? does it have a lot of stretch to it?
     
  23. jim.bell

    jim.bell Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Messages:
    199
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Louisville KY
    C.W. I'll send you a link...
     
  24. bigvisk

    bigvisk Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 2, 2011
    Messages:
    298
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    upstate ny
    it is a bit sticky, and it has little to no stretch. i carry some, especially good for tying things together, like little woods projects, making chairs etc. it is thinner than paracord and gets a good bite and grip for projects but i still use paracord for my tarp shelters, i tried bank line one time and i was very afraid the wind would rip out the tabs so i always use paracord because of the stretch.
     
  25. 41magfan

    41magfan Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2011
    Messages:
    450
    Likes Received:
    522
    With absolutely no intent of misdirecting this thread, I thought I’d throw this out as another alternative form of nylon cordage that has similar properties of bank line. It’s woven instead of twisted and it’s not tarred - but it’s strong, low stretch and holds knots very well. With the color options available, it’s extremely useful for “hi-viz” or “stealth” applications.

    http://countycomm.com/tether.html


    [​IMG]
     
  26. ineffableone

    ineffableone Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,697
    Likes Received:
    351
    Location:
    Pac Northwet
    For me, I love both bank line and 550 and pack both. I also carry artificial sinew usually too plus jute or hemp twine and sometimes some rope. I definitely like having cordage options and given the resources and time will even make natural cordage in the bush rather than use my man made stuff.

    To me it isn't about bank line or 550, but two very good cordages that fill different rolls.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 7, 2012
  27. Averageiowaguy

    Averageiowaguy Guest

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Bank line is brand spanking new to me. I didn't grow up using it and the first time I had ever seen it used was on the expedition. I'm in the process of evaluating it. I like it for certain tasks. I like Paracord for others. For instance, I am probably always going to carry a 30 foot piece of paracord for ridge line.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 7, 2012
  28. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Messages:
    54,330
    Likes Received:
    65,764
    Gentlemen, mentioning of DC, and or his endorsement of products is not allowed on Bush Craft USA. Both of your post have been edited for that reason

    Regards

    Mac


    We now return you to your scheduled programing
     
  29. Easterner

    Easterner Banned Member Banned

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    Messages:
    339
    Likes Received:
    1
    I grew up using tarred line for just about everything on shore, in the woods or on the boats.
    I get mine from Rainbow Net & Rigging, they have twisted and if you ask they also have 3 ply braided in various strengths and thicknesses.
    http://www.rainbownetrigging.com/product.php?PNUM=9043

    I am in no way associated with this business, except for the simple fact that when I worked on fishing vessels as a kid these were the guys we got our stuff from (and they were local!) and the line isn't spool dipped, it's coated then spooled. Vastly superior, and less sticky.
     
  30. hitrekker

    hitrekker Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    May 7, 2012
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Quebec, Canada
    As someone mentioned earlier, the tar coating makes it easier to tie and keep knots tight which I guess explains its use in fishing nets and the like.

    One thing I always wondered is if the tar coating and the smell has any negative effect if you use it in snares or traps?
     
  31. Averageiowaguy

    Averageiowaguy Guest

    Blog Posts:
    0
    That is a good question. I was wondering that myself. They were using it for traps/snares on the expedition but I am not sure how much success they were having relative to what you would have with other materials. One would think it has an unnatural smell to it. I know a few simple traps but I'm far from an expert.
     
  32. Easterner

    Easterner Banned Member Banned

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    Messages:
    339
    Likes Received:
    1
    The tarring makes it abrasion, gas/diesel, sea water resistant (sea water will break down nylon eventually, UV will break it down for that matter.)
     
  33. Peregrine

    Peregrine Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2012
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    23
    I love bankline, i also like to keep some cotton cord as well.
     
  34. zpstl321

    zpstl321 Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Messages:
    354
    Likes Received:
    1
    The more I use both the more I find favor with bank line. I picked some up at WalMart for next to nothing and started using it for this and that. Before long I found I was not using ParaCord for anything other than crafts/Lanyards and such. The real work was done with BL.

    Also, just a note on the different colored lines posted above. The Black line was tar coated, while the other colors apear to be uncoated. I mostly use uncoated line for my task. Heck, I've even been using braded or twisted jute more lately and I'm thinking about buying some jute rope that I found in a local store.
     
  35. fire65

    fire65 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,869
    Likes Received:
    664
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    I carry them both, I like the bank line for securing my tarp and it is cheap, so I just cut it and throw it away. Never even heard of paracord until this site. I used just carry, and still do, a roll of white nylon string.
     
  36. 1773

    1773 Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,347
    Likes Received:
    1,355
    Bank line is good stuff indeed, I suspect the smell would impact its usefulness for snares/land traps, it wouldn't impact fish traps at all I don't think. But you could carry a small coil of stainless picture hanging wire and have a much better snare building material anyway for a very minor amount of added weight and its strength is more than enough for squirrels and rabbits and similar sized creatures.
     
  37. Adam

    Adam Guide Bushclass I

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2011
    Messages:
    4,465
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Missouri
    It has its uses just like everything. I have no doubt that there are people who won't use it for no reason other than someone we don't care for has used it.

    In the summer when it gets good and hot in a pack, it can be messy to work with and gets on everything, in the winter it can be harder to work with if you have cold hands due to the small diameter and putting a good bite down on it can be tougher as well because it can cut in to the hands when working with it. All of this I learned running bank lines as a kid.
     
  38. Silverker

    Silverker Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2011
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SW Oklahoma
    I've always carried both paracord and bank line. Never thought to use the bank line for most things other than fishing and lighter stuff. With the catfish around here, I grew up using it for bank lines and trot lines. Recently, I wanted to try my hand at net making and found ( as others have stated) the tared bank line holds the knots better. Thanks for opening my eyes to other uses guys.
     
  39. DeriusT

    DeriusT Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2011
    Messages:
    920
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    SW Ohio
    I agree J the seven inner strands (which can really be broken down to 14 strands that rate about #35 if I remember right) is a really good property of paracord, not to mention you can use the outer sheath as cordage too. Bankline is only a 3 braid string, but I find it tends to roll and twist up a lot less than paracord. Makes it easier to sew with and other finer tasks. You should give some a try. You'll be amazed at it's versatility. :4:
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2012
  40. JC1

    JC1 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    1,253
    Location:
    Alaska
    is there anyone else we are not aloud to mention?
     
  41. Sgt. Mac

    Sgt. Mac Elder

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Messages:
    54,330
    Likes Received:
    65,764
    Nope
     
  42. Red Panda

    Red Panda Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    280
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Guelph, ON
    I don't know who DC is, but now I'm curious. This is gonna bug me.

    Anyways, I like to carry extra pieces of zing-it in my bag. I use it for my ridgeline/guylines & just general purpose cordage. I also carry some 1/4" amsteel blue. The The only paracord I have is either my shoelaces or box knot lanyards on some of my things.
     
  43. Averageiowaguy

    Averageiowaguy Guest

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Zing it is another good product. I've made a ridge line for my hammock tarp with that before. I went back to paracord for the ridge line though. I like to have some shock cord prussik knots on the ridge line to tension the tarp. Those prussik knots hold a little better for me on paracord. Bank line felt a lot like zing-it but more substantial somehow. I've not had any experience with Amsteel Blue but it is all the rage in the hammock community.
     
  44. WoodsJack

    WoodsJack Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2012
    Messages:
    3,564
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    Motorhome Fulltiming
    I use both paracord and bank line. I virtually never "need" more than 300lb load, if even that much, actually.

    Bank line is much more compact per length and it's smaller diameter can be an advantage for some uses.

    But these ol' hands are finding para knots often easier, especially in dim light/dark.
     
  45. Red Panda

    Red Panda Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    280
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Guelph, ON
    I've never tried shock cord prussiks, sounds interesting. I've tried the shock cord tensioners for the tarp guylines & really like that trick. I'm not familiar with bankline, but the comments about it being sticky in hot weather, make me think of tree sap. Is that an accurate analogy?

    I originally picked up amsteel to make whoopie slings, but haven't used them yet. I just prefer the simplicity of my webbing straps/buckles, for now. I just like to have some for contingencies. It's not that heavy & the strength:diameter ratio is nothing short of miraculous.

    I'm tempted to get some bankline, just to try making a net with it. I've obviously been watching too much Ray Mears.
     
  46. FishingJunkie92

    FishingJunkie92 Guest

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I prefer bank line. There's a youtube video someone made on it too.

    Jeremy
     
  47. DeriusT

    DeriusT Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2011
    Messages:
    920
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    SW Ohio
    Not really. It is a little sticky, and can get on your pack or clothes in really hot weather, so I carry it wrapped in it's own little canvas cloth, but it's not like runny or anything like tree sap...
     
  48. Calafia666

    Calafia666 Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,601
    Likes Received:
    6,274
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I've been using bankline for a while now and rarely ever miss the paracord. It holds knots a lot better and weighs nothing if you precut lengths rather than bringing the entire roll. Also it burns better than p-cord, maybe possible fire options there?
     
  49. Averageiowaguy

    Averageiowaguy Guest

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I show my older hammock setup in this video at about 2:34. I can't remember if I was using Zing-It with the prussiks or paracord at that time, but they work great to reposition the tarp. Also the shock cord keeps tension on the tarp even as the silnylon stretches.
    [video=youtube;usX69Po2Jzo]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usX69Po2Jzo[/video]

    As far as stickiness of the line, the only place I have ever used the stuff was in the Amazon jungle. I guess if it was going to be sticky, it would have been sticky there and I didn't notice that it was. I do think that bank line has significant variance from supplier to supplier and my particular source for this (who cannot be named, I guess just call him Voldemort) has good stuff.
     
  50. Red Panda

    Red Panda Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    280
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Guelph, ON
    AIG,

    You had the exact setup that I currently have. I just got it, this year and have been completely satisfied with its performance. I already subscribe to your channel, I'll have to check it out to see your current kit.

    Thanks.
     

Share This Page