Polar blades?

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by ny bushcrafter, Mar 3, 2011.

  1. ny bushcrafter

    ny bushcrafter Scout

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    Why are Polar and Lauri knife blades have a double bevel? I orded a 4.8" Lauri blade and was shocked that it had a double bevel. I have a tri Arkansas Stone and was wondering if i could make it a single beveled blade on it? Its the sharpest blade i own, but i dont know how to keep it that sharp. Being that the bevel is small and hard to sharpen. :confused:

    http://www.bensbackwoods.com/servlet/Detail?no=431
     
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  2. Adventure Sworn

    Adventure Sworn Cody Vendor

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    -Two ways of going about it. You could work it on a stone until you get a perfectly flat scandi grind. That would probably prove quite time consuming, even with a coarse stone. But if it's what you want, then that's how you do it. If your stones aren't coarse enough, then you can get some very coarse sand paper sheets (most hardware stores) like 180-220, & set it on a flat surface and use that like a stone. Once the secondary bevel is eliminated, then move on to the finer stones or paper to get the edge fine.

    -You could also not necessarily remove the edge bevel, but improve it, by turning it into a convex micro-bevel. This will make it hold an edge longer, and be easier to sharpen. I'd lay some sandpaper/wet&dry on top of mouse pad (or something that has some slight squish to it). Then you lay the edge bevel flat (as you would on stones), then strop it backwards, keeping the bevel flat.

    In my opinion the only good secondary bevel is a convex one. Also worth mentioning, the easiest grind to sharpen is a scandi-vex. But of course, you do sacrifice a bit of cutting aggressiveness & control for extra edge holing capability. It's all about what you want & your bushcraft style.
     
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  3. ny bushcrafter

    ny bushcrafter Scout

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    Thanks Man i appreciate it!
     
  4. ny bushcrafter

    ny bushcrafter Scout

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    Well i think i will keep it how it is and if i need to i will make it to a scandi-vex.
     
  5. Adventure Sworn

    Adventure Sworn Cody Vendor

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    Yeah dude, quite frankly it will work great as is. Just give it a shot and see what you think. :dblthumb:
     
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  6. A K Church

    A K Church Guide

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    Would a Polar blade with a double bevel be bipolar?
     
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  7. PMSteve

    PMSteve Old Timey Outdoorsman Supporter

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    Sometimes. Sometimes not....
     
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  8. briarbrow

    briarbrow Banned Member Banned

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    warning!! excessive instructional material follows

    You may try this. Lay the blade flat on the main bevel and polish until it creates a continuous wear along the edge. It may start to look like some kind of fake hamon as your flat polish flows through the inexact of the grinder belt. As you make your stroke observe the flow of the water, or oil on your stone as it pushes away where the blade is contacting/ pressure is applied on the stone. try 10 or more strokes per side. holding the blade flat on the stone.

    The learning part is next where you cant the blade up slightly. Practice on your finest hone so as to create a distinctively different shine. And also risk the least metal to the learning curve. this line is different that the first. you want this width the be even along the length. Eventually the main bevel will be polished back to the spine but there is no need to hurry there. If the bevel looks wide at the tip then your hand is dropping as you bring the tip 'round, etc.

    When you think you got the feel, use the elevated angle on 600 or somesuch grit and you should be able to shave armhair after just a few strokes.

    If it chips doing what you consider normal work you can elevate the ridge line higher next time. or if if gets stuck, wont slice lower some. you should be able to re-sharpen 3-6 times before polishing the main bevel again.

    That at least is the flat microbevel way as best I can describe. After 600_1000 level you could go straight through a couple strops with different compounds. Or progress through finer stones.

    Flat is the easiest to be precise with; sharp requires a precise intersection between planes of the bevel. By keeping your hones with a tight tolerance for flat they match one another. going way down or up in grit is not a trouble when the surfaces match already.

    Stropping can be very helpful but can also easily dull the edge if the substrate rolls too much. The strop cannot create the flat needed for sharp. It doesn't work well on it's own. eventually ime the edge becomes rounded and fatigued. Fresh metal needs to be exposed/ old edge cut way.

    Using 600 grit edge has 80% or more of fineness the steel can achieve. If you are cutting something that will dull any edge quickly like fiberglass or silica impregnated wood or dirt etc there is no use going finer -yet, the toothyness acts like stress risers that let the edge fail getting very dull relatively soon. compared to a finer edge, with its narrower dimensions is more continuous.=stronger. :56:
     
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  9. VtBlackDog

    VtBlackDog Supporter Supporter

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    I just got done getting a zero edge on three Wood Jewell/Lauri puukkos.....it was NOT fun! sandpaper/diamond plate/swearing.....after checking the edge under a magnifiying glass, more swearing.
     
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  10. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    Traditional in Nordic countries. But they will make what you are willing to pay for, even if they prefer something else.
     
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  11. charlesmc2

    charlesmc2 Scout

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    I like the edge I get when I convex out the micro or secondary bevel. It just seems to glide through cuts really well. I'm not a wood carver, though. No talent, although I do appreciate a good Scandi edge when sharpening a pencil!

    When I sharpen a chisel, though, I do like to sharpen along the bevel established by maker, assuming it is a good quality tool, but then increase the angle by 2 or 3 degrees for the final edge. Just makes it a bit quicker/easier to get that final edge. It also makes the edge a tad stronger. I learned this method when I first started getting into the science of sharpening, but I do not recall the source.

    Like everything in this subforum, this is all about balancing competing needs/wants.
     
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  12. saxonaxe

    saxonaxe Scout

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    I sharpen my Lauri Leuku that I carry in the woods with a Butcher's Steel...
    Medic! Medic! come quick, there's forum members fainting here....:18: :18:
     
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  13. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    I too like convexing out a flat secondary bevel. That, of course, violates the "official" definition of the so-called "Scandi" grind.

    It is also the natural consequence of the many minor variations, over time involved in free-hand sharpening.
     
  14. hr80

    hr80 I love Bushcraft USA! Lifetime Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Damn the nords got necromanced....2011
     
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  15. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    Sold as "Sandi" grind.
    [​IMG]
     
  16. GoKartz

    GoKartz Sharpaholic Supporter

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    Looks more Fennoscandi to me. :54:
     
  17. TAHAWK

    TAHAWK Guide

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    Beckoscandi.
     
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  18. GoKartz

    GoKartz Sharpaholic Supporter

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    Now is that with a convex microbevel? Maybe a beckoscandivex?
     

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