1. Due to the amount of SPAM from foreign countries lately, we have made the decision to manually approve all new members. While we regret that this must be done and the added time that it will take for new members to be approved, it is necessary at this time. We hope to have legitimate new members approved in a timely manner, no longer than a couple of hours. If the Administrators are online at the time, it can be as soon as a couple of minutes. Thank you for your patience.
    Dismiss Notice

Possible Winter Under Quilt?

Discussion in 'Hammocks' started by CharClothed, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. CharClothed

    CharClothed Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2016
    Messages:
    1,086
    Likes Received:
    1,591
    Location:
    Michigan
    So I have this DIY Survival Blanket a family friend made. Shown in the photos below. I was curious if maybe I could use this for a under quilt somehow? It's a little dirty with stains on it cause I can't wash it. There's some sort of insulation material on the inside, as well as a emergency blanket (why I can't wash it), and some other things.

    When ground camping in the winter, I would use this below me. I could walk barefoot with snow still below. It kept me plenty warm. My first winter camp I had this and the MSS and I survived the night. Combined with a spare summer pad someone brought, I slept good enough when the MSS stayed closed, which wasn't often. The second trip I went on I had a Big Agnes Q Core Sleeping Pad (I learned my lesson fast the first trip) and I used this as a group floor then. Don't know why but I kept falling from the sleeping pad but the white survival blanket did really well combined with a SubZero Surplus Bag I got to replace the MSS. I was pretty toasty in that and would use it again, if it wasn't the same size as my large laundry basket when closed. The original purpose was to put on the windows of my brother's current place during the winter (there's no insulation in that house) and when he did do that, he stayed plenty warm.

    So it's seen uses and done well. The question is can I do something at all to turn it into a under quilt to keep me warm during the winter while in the hammock? It'd be paired with a ENO Double Nest. Inside the hammock I'd be using a wool blanket above me and a sleeping bag inside that. Below are the photos.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Red Wing

    Red Wing Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2016
    Messages:
    1,271
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Location:
    Dublin, oh
    Youll have to sew suspension channrls and not having draft collars at the ends. Cold weather accentuates little problems.
     
    rsnurkle likes this.
  3. CharClothed

    CharClothed Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2016
    Messages:
    1,086
    Likes Received:
    1,591
    Location:
    Michigan
    My idea which was just simple was to add grommets along either end, 5-10 on either end and use those to cinch the ends together.
     
  4. ozarkhunter

    ozarkhunter Hobbyist Hobbyist

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2014
    Messages:
    1,007
    Likes Received:
    2,575
    Thought about doing the same with an inexpensive sleeping bag my adult daughters left in my attic...
     
  5. gargoyle

    gargoyle Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2010
    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    95
    Location:
    Middlebury, IN
    The mylar/space blanket material will not breathe. It will collect condensation. Once wetted out, that blanket will be an ice cube. Test your gear at home first. If things go bad, you can bail to the house.
    Grommet ends will allow gaps.

    For Michigan winters, I would suggest a 3" loft in your underquilt. Down or synthetic.
    You could diy an uq from an old sleeping bag. It will be heavy and not as packable as high end gear, but it can work.

    There are a few gatherings coming up in MI for the hammock crowd. It would do you well to attend and see the gear that is used. Stay all weekend or just visit for a day.
     
    rsnurkle and camp casey like this.
  6. CharClothed

    CharClothed Guide

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2016
    Messages:
    1,086
    Likes Received:
    1,591
    Location:
    Michigan
    You must not have read a part of this.

    "When ground camping in the winter, I would use this below me. I could walk barefoot with snow still below. It kept me plenty warm. My first winter camp I had this and the MSS and I survived the night. Combined with a spare summer pad someone brought, I slept good enough when the MSS stayed closed, which wasn't often. The second trip I went on I had a Big Agnes Q Core Sleeping Pad (I learned my lesson fast the first trip) and I used this as a group floor then. Don't know why but I kept falling from the sleeping pad but the white survival blanket did really well combined with a SubZero Surplus Bag I got to replace the MSS. I was pretty toasty in that and would use it again, if it wasn't the same size as my large laundry basket when closed. The original purpose was to put on the windows of my brother's current place during the winter (there's no insulation in that house) and when he did do that, he stayed plenty warm."

    I have tested the blanket. If it's going to get wet, it's going to be against the ground. It acted like a normal blanket the entire time.
     
  7. bosque bob

    bosque bob Tracker

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    104
    Note - this is a real question. Can the insulating blanket just be used inside the hammock instead? I have never used an under quilt, I didn't know what they were before visiting this site, but many brisk nights have been comfortably spent in hammocks before I discovered my ignorance and slept directly on an insulating layer.
     
  8. george carr

    george carr Tracker Vendor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2016
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    161
    Location:
    southern new jersey, near the piney woods
    Any insulation that you lay on will lose loft, and therefore lose warmth. The reason an under quilt works is because it can fully loft as it hangs under the hammock. It has to be in contact with the hammock when you lay in it or any air spaces will be cold spots.
     
    rsnurkle, GoKartz and bosque bob like this.
  9. xrayit

    xrayit Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2015
    Messages:
    560
    Likes Received:
    1,200

    Thats the issue with sleeping bags in general, you lose half the insulation by laying on it, quilts are the way to go when I backpack. I have switched over to a top quilt and thermarest or klymit insulated pad when tent camping. Have a 3/4 and full length under quilt in 40 and 0 degree for my hammocks. Check out the Big Agnus sleeping bags and sierra designs quilts. Both are bringing the quilt concept to the main stream.
     
    rsnurkle and camp casey like this.
  10. Red Wing

    Red Wing Supporter Supporter

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2016
    Messages:
    1,271
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Location:
    Dublin, oh
    Honestly.. Ive been doing this a long time.. am friends with originators of common gear now..

    Nothing has trumped experience and testing in my case. Lot of stuff looks good on paper and doesnt actually work when tried for whatever reason you couldnt have thought about without being out there.
     
    rsnurkle likes this.
  11. george carr

    george carr Tracker Vendor

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2016
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    161
    Location:
    southern new jersey, near the piney woods
    Since quilt makers are being mentioned I am a vendor here (Loco Libre Gear) and am a maker of top and under quilts. A link to my website is on my signature line.
     
    ozarkhunter likes this.
  12. gargoyle

    gargoyle Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2010
    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    95
    Location:
    Middlebury, IN
    Yes Char I read your posts.
    The product you have is called Warm Window. Its been around a long time and the hammock guys tried to make it work. Jo-Ann Fabrics and the like have been selling the stuff for a number of years. I first saw it used in a hammock in 2008. It can work and you can cut and shape your window cover up into a suitable UQ. Use what you got, learn as you go.

    Heres what we found out.
    1.. It is bulky. It packs huge compared to alternative insulation. Not a concern if one is car/pulk camping. But that rolled up blanket is huge and pack space is everything in winter camping. Extra clothes, food and misc. cold weather kit adds to everyone's pack.
    2. It does not breathe. The foil space blanket does stop draft and the loft holds a certain amount of body heat. It was good down to 30* or a little more. Below 30, you need something more under you.
    3. It is warm...for a day. or night. but when the condensation builds up, it is a virtual slab of ice the second night, if it does not have a chance to dry out.
    While your blanket/window cover may have performed well in combination with all the other gear you had, it has it's shortcomings as a true, lightweight and packable under quilt. A MSS is warm. It is also 10-12 pounds. Rated at -30*, I am not surprised you were warm.

    Short overnight trips will not reveal the faults in lots of gear. Even the best expedition gear, used long term, will become saturated with body vapor, breath vapor, and condensate and freeze. Arctic explorers have been dealing with it forever. The one trick they do is sleep in a vapor barrier (Plastic bag, essentially) and contain the body's moisture. The VB keeps the insulation from becoming waterlogged. Theres a great story of one Arctic team that had frozen sleeping bags. They packed them in the dog sled like surf boards, since they couldn't fold them after a week out.
    FWIW, I have been hammocking since 1978. I've tried or made a lot of different things in the hammock industry.
    As the others have said, some things work. Some things work really well. In my experience after a few nights out in sub-freezing weather, my boots, gloves and sleeping gear can become soaked with body moisture and they are not performing as when dry. A quick overnight versus a longer trip in the cold are two different things. Condensation is a killer.
     
    Red Wing, rsnurkle and camp casey like this.
  13. camp casey

    camp casey Scout

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2014
    Messages:
    887
    Likes Received:
    1,042
    Location:
    michigan
    Staying dry is the reason some of us use hot tent and wood stoves, and hammock hot and wood stove rigs, drying quilts and sleeping bags around a campfire is a challenge, requires a lot of fuel/work.
    Good luck.
     
    rsnurkle likes this.

Share This Page