Post Your Cordage Photos (Natural Cordage, Lashings, Improvised Cordage etc..)

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by NWPrimate, Aug 16, 2016.

  1. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I tried making fireweed (Chamaenerion angustifolium) cordage for the first time today.

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    The process of removing the outer fibers was a litle more difficult than working with stinging nettles but not bad. It was surprisingly slimy though.

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    While removing the fibers was a little bit more tedious than working with nettles, it yielded some really nice material. It split down along the entire length with ease and twisted together very nicely after drying for about an hour in the breeze. I didn't trim it at all and it still came out looking pretty. This is eight feet of two strand twist.

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    Doubled over again into 4-ply.

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    I put it through the bow drill test.

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    It's only showing a little bit of wear. Thanks again @Pict for showing me the superiority of 4-ply cordage for bow drill.

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    I really like this stuff. You don't need gloves to harvest it and it really twists together nicely. I wanted to try it on the fly today, but I'm going to experiment with giving more drying time and breaking down the fibers further.

    It looks like this plant is fairly widespread, so some of you might have it in your area.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
  2. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    Nicely done @NWPrimate , that looks like some really good stuff and we'll made. I see at one end of the bow you used a knot through a split to hold the cord, what is going on at the other end out of curiosity?
     
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  3. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thanks @melbolt65 . With natural cordage, wrapping it around my fingers works best for me. It lets me adjust the tension as needed, just by flexing my fingers.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I had to sit in on a conference call yesterday and ended up twisting up some cordage out of strips of printer paper.

    [​IMG]

    It was a lot stronger than I was expecting and I couldn't break it with my hands. Of course I had to try it with a bow drill set and for a while it looked like it was working.

    Unfortunately, once the friction started to build, it slipped a little and I felt it get loose. I tightened it up again and it snapped.



    I think making a bit more and clove hitching it or twisting it into 4-ply would have been enough to make this work.
     
  5. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    @NWPrimate : nice use of conference call time! :)
    Did you like the wide of the strips shown in the picture, or if you did it again, would you change the width? I'm trying to build a sense for the benefits of starting wider or narrow for cordage materials. I think there's been previous discussion in this thread about the ease of twisting up narrower material, but I imagine the wider material has better breaking strength when it's twisted up.
     
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  6. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    That's a good question @rsnurkle and one that I often wonder about too. From my limited experience it almost seems like finer fibers are better at gripping each other in the twist and so kind of make up for the reduced individual strength by combining forces. The limitation I usually run into with natural fibers is that I can only break them down so far before I start losing so much length that it feels like I'm working against myself.

    The paper might be a little different though since it's kind of a unique material. Thinner stripes would probably result in an overall smoother cordage which could make it less prone to tearing itself, but I do get the feeling that going much thinner than I did would have resulted in weaker cordage. I wasn't putting much thought into it at the time, my fingers just started twisting a strip that I twisted off of my note sheet, and before I knew it I was heading inside for more paper. :)

    If I was trying to make the strongest printer paper cordage possible, I would probably pay extra attention to making uniform strips around the same size that I used last time; cutting instead of tearing them and tapering the ends to facilitate smoother splicing.
     
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  7. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    basswood done by @Pict method. thanks for sharing and so fast!
    20170714_125454.jpg
     
  8. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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  9. Pict

    Pict Qualified to attempt things at home Supporter

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    Basswood is good stuff. It's one of my favorite carving woods, feels like soap.

    Back in the day I used to cut grass for the Township, public parks and right of ways all over the place. We used a John Deere farm tractor with a sidebar cutter, and I spent four days a week just cutting grass to keep ahead of it all. One property, Oakbourne Park, took a full eight hours. The rough ground constantly tripped the breakaway of the sidebar so it was two steps forward and one step backing up to reset the bar all day.

    Halfway through the summer we added a John Deere 760. I left for the park at 8:00 AM. When I showed up at the shop at @10:30 my boss came over all worried.

    "What's the matter?"

    "Nothing's the matter. I'm done." His face lost all color.

    "Don't you tell ANYONE how fast you can cut grass now! If the commissioners know we can get it all done in two days they'll load us up with all kinds of $#!# to do!"
     
  10. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    practising cordage wrappimg. jute and hemp with some 4ply

    sounds familiar, i used to work maintenance at our regional airport and my boss gave me something to do and i came back a few hours later and he was suprised saying it was supposed to take me the rest day! opps
     
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  11. Pict

    Pict Qualified to attempt things at home Supporter

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    Making enough cordage for a project isn't supposed to take all day.
     
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  12. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    More fun with nettles today.

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    I broke them down into a handful of fibers as usual.

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    It's amazing how much they shrink after hanging in the breeze for an hour.

    [​IMG]

    Once they dried out completely, I soaked them in the creek to get them flexible again. After having success with braiding strips of maple bark, I wanted to see if I could make a bow drill cord by braiding nettles instead of twisting them. I separated out about ten to twenty percent of the fibers and hung them up in case I needed to supplement thickness along the way and tied a knot in the rest.

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    To keep the three strands separated, I gave them each a loose twist. This helped, but I was still fighting the ends through the process.

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    I hitched the knot to a tree with a piece of grass and started braiding. I actually twisted the fibers the same way as you would with a two-strand twist for each time I folded a strand over the middle.

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    The extra fibers I set aside came in handy in keeping the strands consistent, and when it tapered out at the end, I switched over to two strand twist, thinking that this thin section would work great for wrapping around my fingers.

    I eneded up with three feet of proper braid, and another eight inches of twisted twine at the end.

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    It passed the bow drill test.

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    Almost no damage.

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    Aside from keeping the ends from tangling, I was impressed at how quickly I could braid this up. Despite not having the muscle memory in place, it seemed faster than two-strand twisting, and because it held up well to the bow drill test, it has me wondering what the pros and cons are of twist vs. braid.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2017
  13. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I made some more maple bark cordage today. I started with three strips of bark as close to the same width as I could tear them, and about five feet long.

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    I've tried braiding this stuff before, but when I did, I folded it over onto itself like this.

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    While that worked well, for the sake of experiment I wanted to try twisting the strands with each pass to see if I could get a narrower cordage of the same strength.

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    Because of the way it tears, the ends always end up tapering off. When they got thin and uneven, I shredded them and finished it up with about six inches of two-strand twist.

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    I ended up with about four feet of cordage overall. It isn't pretty, but it feels really strong.

    [​IMG]

    It passed the bow drill test with no problem and seems like it's a bit tougher than the folded braid.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I made up some cordage out of willow bark yesterday.

    [​IMG]

    I've used this stuff a lot for basic lashings, but have never tried making proper cordage out of it. The bark separated from the wood very easily, but because the outer bark is very thin, it was difficult to separate that outer layer. I got most of it in the conventional fashion shown below, but eventually resorted to sliding a knife blade between them which worked well.

    [​IMG]

    Bark strips after drying in the sun for an hour.

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    The same handful after soaking in the creek to rehydrate it.

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    I was working toward a quick bow drill cord for @kcardwel 's one species friction fire challenge and was in a bit of a rush, so I opted to twist braid large strips rather than try to break it down into finer fibers. The strips I had weren't as long as those that I get from large maples or cottonwoods, so I had to improvise a couple of splices. This went really smoothly.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the finished product.

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    Like before, I finished it out with some two-strand twist to wrap around my fingers while working the bow drill.

    [​IMG]

    I am really impressed with this stuff. The willow bow drill set I made was very stubborn and i put the cord under a lot of stress. It got a little chewed up, but never came close to letting me down. Unfortunately, I couldn't get the set to produce an ember, but that wasn't any fault of the cordage.

    [​IMG]

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    One quick side note about working with this stuff. I could feel it sucking the moisture out of my fingers. Once I was done braiding it, my fingertips felt like they had been soaking in rubbing alcohol. It definitely has some astringent properties to it. There was no real damage, but if I had to make thirty feet of this stuff, I think my fingers would take a beating.
     
  15. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    if i remember correctly you can suck on the inner bark of willow for headaches... same proprieties as Tylenol
     
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  16. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Because I have used bank line for so many bow drill fires, when I first started making natural cordage that was my template, and I made it way too thin and had lots of failures and close calls. This year I have been playing around with making much beefier rope and it works better and lasts much longer.

    I wanted to see where the point of diminishing returns was so I figured I'd make some thick stuff today. When processing plants like nettles or fireweed into cordage, the fiber is a lot more precious than when using tree bark. With bark, it only take another minute or so to gather twice as much, and it doesn't really take any longer to twist or braid thicker strands.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Instead of just using thicker strips of bark in my braid, I wanted to try using thinner fibers. This maple bark will tear all the way down when it is thick, but as it thins out you tend to lose length to runoffs.

    I took some extra time and found it easy to slice relatively consistent thin strips with a knife stuck into a tree like this.

    [​IMG]

    I could probably get away with using one third as much material.

    [​IMG]

    This is definitely the strongest stuff I've ever made. I am pretty confident that it could take my weight and meant to test that. It didn't end up being much thicker than the willow stuff I posted the other day, but there was a lot more material packed in there.

    [​IMG]

    Being so thick, it was pretty stiff so I wasn't sure how it would handle wrapping around the spindle, but it actually worked great. I think the larger surface area gave it more grip on the spindle and even though I kept it loose, there was almost no slippage.

    [​IMG]

    I'm sure I could get a lot more embers out of this one.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2017
  17. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Great testing, @NWPrimate , looks like you haven't reached the point of diminishing returns on thickness just yet--increased durability and spindle grip (without forcing the tension to be high) all sound good to me. It seems like taking the time (however long it was :D) to make a beefier bow string is a good investment in reliability compared to the concerns with thinner natural cordage bowstrings.
     
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  18. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thanks @rsnurkle . I think anything beyond this thickness would probably just be overkill, but I've been wanting to try making some even thicker stuff anyway, so of course I'll bow drill test it and find out.

    Are you still playing with basswood cordage?
     
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  19. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    @NWPrimate that's some good looking cordage. i have to remember to try braiding natural stuff..... for what ever reason i have it in my head to stick with the old way of twisting to make cordage and always space braiding...... for some things i've tried and just failed on i think braiding would have worked :)

    speaking of basswood. i've got some i need to soak and work up plus i have some plenty other logs and branches i've kept for carving that need to be stripped as well
     
  20. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thanks @UAHiker . I've only recently started playing with braid too so I can't say this definitively, but it seems like it's more abrasion resistant than two strand twist or even 4-ply twisted cordage.
     
  21. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    I'm on to cattails currently--planning to use them for the braided natural cordage component of a BushClass lesson.

    After that, actually, my hope is to try out the 3-stand twist mentioned in Hilary Stewart's Cedar (borrowed a copy from the library and am seeing if they can track down one of her earlier books for me). Seeing your tests, I'm now curious whether the 3 strand twist would give you a good beefy rope. (Although it might be less efficient to produce than the four ply via two strand twist).
     
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  22. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Isn't that a great book?!! I would guess that it has you wishing that WRC grew in your area. It's probably still inspiring though, as there is a lot that you can adapt to other materials.

    I have to thank @MisterHoodoo again for recommending it. :dblthumb:


    Nice...it can be hard to keep up with all of the bushclass lessons, so I hope you'll post your results here too so I don't overlook it.

    I've been curious about this too, but haven't learned how to do it yet. Is that the technique where you make a two-strand twist, and then twist in a third strand after it is complete?
     
  23. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    It's a fantastic book! I'll pull the page number when I get back home, but if you visualize how, two strands twine around each other as you twist, then imagine three stands twisting together in that same motion you've got the idea (it's not an after the fact splice in). I don't remember seeing details from Stewart about how you're supposed to hold the material for three strand, but worse case, the European approach to sturdy twisted rope (the rope machine) should be able to do a three strand twist just as easily as it does a four or more strand twist.
     
  24. UAHiker

    UAHiker Supporter Supporter

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    Going to have to check that book out, never heard of it
     
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  25. Youcantreadinthedark

    Youcantreadinthedark Chaotic Neutral. Supporter Bushclass I

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    I have had success making normal two strand material, and then actively separating it and twisting in the third strand after the fact. I haven't seen your book but I suspect you'd have to create some sort of jig to do it all at one time; you've only got so many hands. I'll see if I can dig some pictures up.
     
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  26. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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  27. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Alright, here's the diagram for the three-strand twist,
    [​IMG]
    and a photo of someone doing one by hand
    [​IMG]

    Flipping through Cedar also reminds me that I've been curious about this container @NWPrimate :
    [​IMG]
     
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  28. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thanks for posting that @rsnurkle . I do remember seeing that now and will have to give it a shot. I notice in the photograph that the cordage that she is making doesn't appear to have much twist to it. Now I wonder if I might be overtwisting when working with bark cordage.

    Good eye again on the basket. It's roughly the same design as the canoe bailer shown in that book. I first saw Ray Mears make one in this video a few years ago and have wanted to try it ever since.



    I happened to be stripping maple bark that day and noticed that I could pull a pretty wide section intact and tried adapting the idea to a different species. It was my first attempt and of course I'm no Ray Mears, so it didn't come out great, but it only took a few minutes to make. When done properly, it is supposed to hold water, but mine leaked where I was too rough on the end and cracked the bark. I still want to try this with cedar as I see it as a great container option and something that could even potentially be used to boil water with hot rocks. My leaky maple basket still did a good job collecting berries though. :)
     
  29. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    Wanted to try to make and use a cord from cotton balls. Held up pretty well on the bow drill test. I should've counted how many cotton balls I used, sadly, I didn't. I'm guessing 20-30 range.

    After some experimenting and starting over a couple times, I found it easiest to unravel each cotton ball into strips and then divide these into smaller strands.

    [​IMG]0808172322-1664x936 by melbolt65, on Flickr

    Lots of twisting
    [​IMG]0808172351-1664x936 by melbolt65, on Flickr

    [​IMG]0809170003-1664x936 by melbolt65, on Flickr

    Employed the @NWPrimate finger wrap method with a slight tilt while bowing to avoid abrasion. Worked perfectly, no slippage as the cord stretched like cotton does.
    [​IMG]0809170014-936x1664 by melbolt65, on Flickr

    Success

    [​IMG]0809170018a-1664x936 by melbolt65, on Flickr
     
  30. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Nice work @melbolt65 ! Individually, those fibers have to be pretty short, so this seems like a great illustration of the power of the twist to hold things together. This was a cool idea.
     
  31. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    Thanks bud. Yea, it's pretty amazing how easy it is to pull a single cotton ball apart, yet, combine them a certain way and you get a pretty strong cord, or t-shirt, or denim, etc. I'm pretty amazed by how difficult it is to rip a t-shirt, yet when looking really close, the individual fibers are incredibly small. The strength of many.
     
  32. UAHiker

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  33. UAHiker

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    got some inspiration from @melbolt65 . about 7 ft braided corn husk.
    20170821_122341.jpg
     
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  34. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    One of my earliest posts in this thread last year was a shoddy two-strand of twist some trailing blackberry vines. The cordage that I made was strong, but not flexible enough for bow drilling.



    I can't overstate how abundant these vines are in my area. They cover almost the entire forest floor and are always underfoot.

    [​IMG]

    I use them relatively frequently to bind things together, but it seemed like a shame that they were too brittle for bow drill cordage. I had never tried braiding though, and had some time this afternoon, so I figured it was worth a shot. It only took a couple of minutes to gather and strip as much as I thought I would need.

    [​IMG]

    The issue with this stuff is that while it has a lot of tensile strength, flexing it too far causes the inner pith to break. I know that twisting withies makes them more flexible, so I was hoping that technique might translate to these vines.

    What seemed to work best was crushing the pith as I gave it a half twist, working my way down the vine. I alternated the orientation of the vines to try to keep the cordage uniform, tied them off at the top, and started braiding.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    I spliced in a few vines periodically as needed to keep the thickness uniform and ended up with the three feet or so that I needed for bow drilling. Most of the vines I pulled were around 8 feet long. I didn't need that much length, but rather than cut off the excess, I tied a couple of overhand knots in it so that I could have extra wraps around my hand.

    [​IMG]

    It was a bit stiff, but after some fiddling around to get it into position around the spindle it worked flawlessly.

    [​IMG]

    It showed a bit of wear and tear afterwards, and some of the individual vines broke, but the beauty of twisting or braiding is that the others can take up the slack.

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    It was really cool to be able to make this stuff work. Now I'm really curious if these vines stay flexible enough to use this way through the winter.
     
  35. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    A thing that you might try with brittle cords when bent is to make the spindle extra thick in the middle so it doesn't have to flex as much and leave the tip the usual size, just a theory, may or may not help.
     
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  36. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    That's good advice @melbolt65 . When using any natural cordage, I like to make the spindle thicker than I think is ideal and then taper the tip down where it meets the board. It might be useful to go even thicker, but unless I'm mistaken, I think you eventually run up against a gearing disadvantage if you go too thick. I've tried making some monster ones (≈ 2" diameter) before and never had any luck with them.
     
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  37. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    Ahh, I should have zoomed in a bit, was looking in my phone and I didn't even notice that you'd already done that. Good deal, glad you were able to get an abundant resource in your area to work for you. Good tip about the monster spindle, it will save me that trial, as I have not played around with that much yet.
     
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  38. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    It might still be worth trying for fun. You did manage to pull off the dreaded fire plow through sheer will, so I wouldn't be surprised if you were able to make this work. :)
     
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  39. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    Always wanted to try this, even without the bow, sort of like a tug a war match with a line of people on each side.


    Could be a fun meetup activity
     
  40. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    More fun with blackberries today. This time instead of working with the native trailing species, I grabbed some of these much larger invasive evergreen blackberries (Rubus laciniatus).

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    The thorns on these are a lot nastier. I'm used to just sliding a vine through my leather gloves to knock them off, but these thorns started tearing right in when I tried that.

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    I found that knocking them off with a stick worked fine and saved the wear and tear on my gloves. I collected up a few long ones in hopes of separating the fiber and making some two-strand twist with it.

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    I tried separating them different ways, pounding and flattening like nettles, and splitting the same way I do with saplings, but the inner bark really did not want to separate from the pith. I could get sections about a foot long before they would fray and rip out.

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    The vines were surprisingly dry inside, so I wonder if this is just an effect of the overall dry weather over the last couple of months. I probably should have tried this a month or two ago. I didn't feel like fighting the vines for an inch at a time, but I didn't want to just toss them either. I figured I'd try braiding them in their busted up state just to see what would happen.

    They were too thick and inflexible to tie in an overhand knot at the top, so I used some of the native blackberry vines to wrap them up.

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    Because of all of the broken pith and thorn nodules, this stuff was really hard on my fingers, but turned into some pretty cool looking super thick braid.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  41. MisterHoodoo

    MisterHoodoo Supporter Supporter

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    You probably know this, but the young leaves of fireweed make an amazing tea.
     
  42. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I know I've read that but can't remember if I ever tried it before. Does it get bitter when the leaves get older?
     
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  43. MisterHoodoo

    MisterHoodoo Supporter Supporter

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    I haven't tried. But one of us will experiment before too long I'm sure.
     
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  44. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Braided cordage has really been working out well for me for the bow drill, so I wanted to play around with making some thinner stuff and seeing how it would hold up.

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    The bow drill set that I tested it with was really problematic and I put this thin braid under a lot of stress and it held up great.

    I posted this video over in the Friction Fire Tuesday thread, but I included some clips of making cordage in it, so it seemed appropriate to post here too.

     
  45. melbolt65

    melbolt65 Guide Bushclass I

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    Very cool @NWPrimate the braided cord seems to be working well for you, like the twist that you add in with it. I haven't played around too much with braiding myself but intend to experiment more with it and compare vs regular twist. I was curious if you had a splicing method for braiding with shorter fibers or if you apply a normal twist to complete the individual strands first and then braid them, as I haven't really been able to find much info about braiding with shorter fibers/splicing or if it's even a worthwhile effort.
     
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  46. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thanks @melbolt65 . I'm really just winging it here, but I have spliced in more fibers into the strands, both for length and thickness purposes. I don't know if it is proper technique, but I just laid them alongside whichever strand I am adding them to and they seem to fall right in line. I like using fibers that are as long as possible, but it's actually kind of a liability when braiding because I spend as much time untangling the ends as I do folding the strands over.

    I started twisting the fibers as a result of using flat pieces of bark, but it seems to make for a much nicer braid with other plant fibers too.
     
  47. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    With all the dry weather, the trees are holding onto their bark tightly and it's becoming increasingly hard to strip from trunks. I use the bark from nascent growth or suckers regularly for wrapping things, and it still comes off relatively easily this time of year. Today I decided to play with some big leaf maple suckers.

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    The bark on these isn't as strong as what you'll find on larger trees, so I've never bothered to process it into proper cordage; but you've got to use what nature is providing at the time, so I cut some of varying diameter.

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    You can see the color difference between the older and newer shoots. The lighter green peeled away easily, while I had to discard most of the darker green pieces.

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    Splitting them in half is the easiest way to get the bark off of these little suckers.

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    There is an outer bark to these, but it was so thin that I didn't bother to separate it.

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    Braided up into a bow drill cord with one of the unusable thicker shoots for the bow.

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    Despite lacking the strength of mature bark, the magic of braid held everything together and there's almost no noticeable difference between the before and after shots.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2017
  48. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I made some braided bow drill cordage out of split cedar withies today.

    [​IMG]

    I put together some short clips of all of the steps plus the cordage in use if you're interested.



    [​IMG]

    As you can imagine, cordage made from branches isn't the most flexible so this wasn't ideal, but it survived the ordeal intact.

    [​IMG]
     
  49. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    My assistant helped me dig up a cedar root for bow drill cordage today.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    I twisted it, flexed, ran it around a sapling, and gave it a five minute soak; all in hopes of making it as flexible as possible.

    [​IMG]



    It worked well and held up great, both during the bow drilling and the ensuing tug of war.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2017
  50. TexasPrimitive

    TexasPrimitive Supporter Supporter

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    On vacation at the beach and I noticed some coconut fibers laying around. So I made some cordage to see what it was like working with shorter fibers. Twisting a hank of them up before starting the cordage helped me not have to splice every few twists. Only had enough motivation to get fiber for six or so inches. Seemed pretty strong. Big takeaway for me was short fibers are very usable.


    IMG_4406.JPG
     

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