Primitive Skills Outing (Hunt,Catch & Cook)

Discussion in 'Outings, Trips & Expeditions' started by Primordial, Jul 13, 2018.

  1. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    So the time has come for me to go on my challenge outing with The First People's Tools, Persian. This tool was created by @Calafia666 . This also happens to be a knife that was donated by our once resident philanthropist, @t.darrah

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    I'll share my assessments of the blade during it's use as posted here. It's going to be a long one so grab your favorite beverage and lets get to it.

    I was up early and needed a full day to pull off what I was hoping to accomplish. I wasted no time in heading out the door. I was full of giddy anticipation of what was going to happen, or at least what I wanted to try to make happen today!

    The first part of my wandering was spent roaming through the lush woods and trails around my house. This morning venture was primarily a resources, forage gathering and crafting time to make some tools and acquire some food that I would use throughout the day.

    As I walked along the trail I noticed some nice, plump wild strawberries growing along side of it. I stuffed my face with a handful and gathered up more onto a thimble berry leaf. I folded the leaf up and used its own stem to bind it into a self contained package. I stashed this on the top of my pack so it wouldn't get squashed.

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    I then headed off into the bush in search of some birch bark. I have 2 species of birch that are very prolific in my area, they are white birch (Betula papyrifera) and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis). Both trees have been historically and culturally important to the “First Peoples” of my region, the Ojibwa.

    The Ojibwa's use of white birch is perhaps best known in the form the beautiful canoes they crafted from it's bark. I have seen some reproductions of these as well the remains of an original and they are quite an impressive water craft to behold. Now if you are wondering if I'm going to make a canoe out of some birch bark, you can stop the wondering right now! I'm not.

    The first set of white birch I wandered into was dead and dying. Sometimes the tree dies and most of the wood rots away leaving the shell of it's bark. Birch bark is naturally rot resistant and if it can stay away from the ground, it will last quite a long time. These trees had died and more or less disintegrated leaving behind these wonderful birch bark tubes for my taking! Score! Now I just had to figure out what to do with them. I had an idea so I stashed the tubes along the trail.

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    I found another dead birch and cut a square of bark off of it. I have to say that cutting birch bark is not a strong point of this blade. The fat,wedge like grind would bind up in cork like matrix of the birch bark. I knew the Persian wasn't a slicer and this proved that fact to me.

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    Continued...
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018
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  2. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    After cutting the birch bark I looked down and noticed the remains of what looked to be the wing of a wood pecker. Only the bones and a few feathers remained of what was once the wing. I took the bones and figured I could come up with some use for them.

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    I continued on to search for my first wild food objective of the day.

    I was looking for these.

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    What are they? Well they are ramps all dressed up in their summer garb. Most people look for ramps (Allium tricoccum ) in the spring when they are easy to find because they are one of the first green things to pop up out of the waking earth. Soon after spring however, the leaves of the ramps wither and die as the plant flowers making this protruding stem. The flower then start's to produce the seeds and this is what you see here...ramps that have gone to seed. It pays to study the life cycle of your local edible plants because you can often extend your harvest periods if you know what to look for. This is especially true when it comes to tubers and root based forage foods.

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    I made a simple digging tool and popped up a cluster of oniony garlic goodness from the earth. In case you didn't know, ramps taken at this time of year are hot...as in spicy hot. A little can go a long way and if you eat one or two of them raw, forget about kissing your significant other for at least 2 days. I stashed the ramps in my pack and headed along the trail.

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    Continued...
     
  3. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I started poking around the ground where some spruce trees were growing. Sometimes you can find the roots just under the surface. It didn't take long to find a stringy tangle of roots that I gently pulled up out of the earth. Spruce roots were used by the Ojibwa as an all purpose cordage. They also used it to bind their birch bark canoes together. It's strong, durable and easy to get. You can often find a lot of it ripe for taking if you come across a fresh blow down. Cedar roots can also be used as a great, “ready made” cordage.
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    I started scraping the outer bark off the spruce roots. Once it gets started you can usually pull off the outer sheath easily. Lets see how nice this stuff is.

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    It takes a knot well and can easily pull duty as a the noose for a small game snare. It slides nice and cinches down tight with no back slip. Perfect. Lets make a squirrel pole snare set in this oak. Pole snares can be effective for squirrel if you place enough of them up. Seeing that snaring tree rats is frowned upon in my state, I'm just making this solo one for demonstrative purposes.

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    Continued...
     
  4. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I packed up the roots and wandered over to some burdock.


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    Burdock( Arctium lappa ) is an often over looked edible plant. This was probably the first non-berry wild edible I have ever eaten. My family (Italian side) has been collecting it since before I can remember and my mom would dip it in egg, dredge it in seasoned bread crumbs and fry it up. I grew up knowing it as gardoni (cardoni in Italian is pronounced with a “G”) The plant when cooked this way tastes much like a meat substitute. Preferably the young spring shoots are used, but if you can find smaller new second growth in summer, it can be eaten too. Once the leaf is mature it's far too tough and bitter to consume. The large taproot of this plant can be eaten too, but it can be a real pain to dig up.

    I cut some of the smaller stalks off.

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    After taking the burdock I roamed around a grassy spot full of goldenrod. I was looking for a few old galls from last year. I found two and had an idea for their use later in the day.

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    I wandered back to the birch bark tubes and took the Persian to the smaller diameter one. I was going to make a special kind of “container” out of it. I trimmed off the thinner bottom portion was more degraded.

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    I then scribed the out line of what would be the bottom of the container onto the square of birch I had cut. I then cut out my traced outline, trimmed it a little more to fit, and bored some holes through it.

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    Continued...
     
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  5. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I also bored some holes along the top and bottom of the birch tube's sides. I then wove the spruce root around the rim of the top part of the tube leaving this knotted off double loop at the end.

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    I decided to make a make shift “needle” out of the one of the bird bones to help me weave some of the spruce root though the roughly bored holes for help in attaching the bottom cap. I decided to use the metacarpus bone because it already had a convenient “eye” that was large enough to allow some of the spruce root to pass through. Used the knife to whittle off the ulnare and radile sections of the bone to make a point. The knife shaved through this material like I was sharpening a pencil. I was quite pleased that the blade could do such fine and delicate work.

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    Once the needle was made I used it to help guide the spruce root through the holes.

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    I ended the root stitching with an opened bow like knot, that could be cinched down later.

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    With that task completed, I walked back into the woods to look for some material to make one more item before I moved on to the rest of the day's primary activities.

    Continued...
     
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  6. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I was looking for a relatively straight piece of maple or ash. These are some of the two toughest woods I have in my area. It didn't take long to spot this nice ash sapling that volunteered for duty.

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    The Persian's fat scandi grind shined through in this task, for it easily blew out chips of wood as I beaver cut around the sapling. This task can be somewhat bothersome with other blade grinds but this “scandi-wedge” performed well. It might not slice well but it sure can chew cut. With the sapling down I now cut off the top end to the length I wanted.

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    The knife did a great job allowing me to achieve a progressive set of deep cuts to the center of the young tree. Again, I was satisfied with it's performance.

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    Now it's time to make something from it.

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    I'm sure we can tell what it is by now?

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    Just about done! Now all we need to do is add some dead maple sticks for the spreaders use some more of that wonderful spruce root to bind it all up.

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    Continued....
     
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  7. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    Can I come stay with you for a while?.......:51:. I gotta ask, how did the strawberries taste? The ones I've had were about half that size and pretty much tasteless.
     
  8. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    In my opinion, making this type of spear was a great test of this knife, or any knife for that matter. The cuts and the ways you have to make them force you to use a knife with both brute force and fine carving motions. You can learn a lot about your blade when making these kinds of spears and they are always a joy to behold when done. I made one just like it in South America to spear giant tadpoles and small lizards, so this tool has a special place in my primitive tools & weapons arsenal.

    Now it was time to pack up my kit and head off to a local lake that I haunt, which is about a 10 minute drive from my house.

    Once I got near the lake I found these native broad leaved cattails (Typha latifolia) and harvested a few of them. I walked over to a rock ledge that over looks the lake and set about my business for the day.

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    Continued...
     
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  9. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I separated some leaves off of the cattail which produced a lot of this gel like slime. I found it interesting and made a mental note that this could be used a lube for bowdrill bearing block.

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    I picked out a few of the longer leaves and set to work weaving them together. I used my toes to help anchor the material and I did a quick 3 ply braid.

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    Then I knotted off each end. I cut a small toggle which I slid into the top (wider) portion of the weave.
    After that I inserted the toggle portion through the double loop on the birch tube's top end.

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    After that I slid the skinnier bottom portion of the weave through the open bow knot and then cinched the root bow tight and tied it off.

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    And voilà! I have a field-expedient back quiver!

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    With that task done, it was now time to hunt for some food.

    Continued...
     
  10. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    In my state it's legal to gig frogs and I'm allowed 5 per day of any species except for endangered ones. So off I went. I checked out some spots along the shore line. I slowly crept along and looked.

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    I looked some more.

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    These spots sure looked froggy, but what do I know? I'm not a frog.

    No frogs here. I was bummed out. I walked down through the woods for about 100 yards where I knew a spring entered the lake. I figured there might be some frogs around there.

    I looked

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    And I walked.

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    And I looked some more....nothing. I didn't want to waste anymore time so I headed back to my spot by the lake to go after another food source.

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    I sure wish these thimble berries were ripe.

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    To catch this food source I needed to make another tool, so I found this basswood sapling and cut it down. The Persian cut through this soft hardwood with ease.

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    I then processed the chunk off at the rock ledge. I cut it to length and removed a section of bark and wood from around the top end. To this I added some jute twine.

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    I wrapped the jute around the cut out section and I added a leader of fishing line to it. I now had an impromptu hand line.

    I took out the golden rod galls and I was going to slice into the side of one so I could wedge the fishing line into it. All this in the hopes of effectively making it into a primitive float. Well as soon as I tried for a slice, the fat grind of the Persian did what it does best...it's wedge shape pushed instead of sliced and it caused the gall to split in half.

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    Continued...
     
  11. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Plan B was to bore a hole in the other gall and just insert the line through the hole. The second gall already had a split that was formed in it so I took no chances.
    The hole worked and I uncovered the larval husk of the insect that had once made the gall it's home.

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    I whittled a little plug to insert into the hole to wedge the line. I then added some sinkers, hook and worm. I was now ready to catch some lunch.
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    While trying to take some photos of the float in action, I actually caught a tiny green sunfish that was hiding under a rock! I guess it works just fine! I counted coup on the fish and let it go.

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    Continued...
     

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  12. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    This lake is chocked full of panfish and it has a healthy population of green sunfish, which is weird because they are not supposed to exist this far north according to the species map. In fact, the first time I caught one out of this lake I didn't know what it was because I had never encountered one before!

    I waded along the lake shore while lobbing my hand line out and soon tied into something that was worth eating.

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    It didn't take too long to catch a mess of the voracious little fish. I added them to my stringer and secured it to shore, keeping my catch alive while I tooled away to prepare for my cooking fire.

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    An attempt at a friction fire was the order of the day. To start with I began scraping some bark fuzz from the trunk of a white cedar. I love having a 90 degree spine on a knife and this Persian has a great one. The spine's curve helps make a great scraping radius that follows the curve of a tree trunk. I like that. I have found that this cedar bark material is one of the best substances to use for the core of a tinder bundle in my area, and I often use it with flint and steel sets.

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    As I started to walk around while gathering some dried grass for my tinder nest, I caught a sudden flash of movement out of the corner of my eye. I quickly turned and spotted this...

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    a @GreenFrog . No, not that green frog, this one: (Lithobates clamitans )

    THUNK! Kermit was now on the menu.

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    The frog action was a welcomed distraction but it was now time to bear down on the task at hand.

    Continued...
     
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  13. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I'm pretty much a noob at friction fire and have achieved an ember once, years ago during my very first attempt, in the snow no less. I tried to get an ember a dozen times after that throughout the years with no success. I kind of let my interest extinguish and I gave up on friction fire, setting it on the back burner. Years went by with out an attempt, and then when I joined BCUSA my interest was rekindled ( notice all the puns?). I started to watch videos by @NWPrimate and the tips made by @Guillaume Longval , and read all the tips and tricks I could , filing them away into my hair covered computer for later use. Today was going to be the first time I had tried a friction fire in about 8 years.

    I didn't have high hopes. The weather was hot and humid and I was sticky and tired. Plus I was lacking skill and experience. I was already thinking up excuses to as why I failed.

    I set all the bits of fire lay before me and I decided I would try using the Persian's hollow tubes and knife handle as my “bearing block”. I was using a pre-made hearth and spindle I had acquired during a BCUSA pass around. My bow was made from a section of the basswood I had cut to make the hand line. Plain old 550 was my cordage.

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    With low expectations I gingerly started my task. The bow seemed to have good tension but it wasn't too tight. That used to be my main bane. The spindles would often fly off the hearth board during my past attempts. I tried to keep and constant rhythm with long strokes and soon some wood dust started to appear. I kept at it and suddenly I was getting smoke! That was good!

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    (Smoke starting!!!)

    I kept going a little faster with a little more pressure when I felt something poke me in the palm of my hand! The top of the spindle had bored it's way through the hollow pin! I stopped for a split second and readjusted my grip and went back to a steady rhythm with some increased speed. More smoke and dust formed! I was getting excited and gave it one last good set of spins and stopped.

    There in my dust pile I spied a lone wisp of smoke rising into the air. I stooped over breathlessly staring at it. I knew a coal must have been formed. At this point I started to get an adrenaline rush much like when the moment of truth arises just before you let loose an arrow at a big game animal. My hands started to shake. I waited a bit and then gently blew on the dust and seen a red glow. EMBER ACHIVED! I knew I wasn't done yet. I gently dropped the ember into my bundle and watched as it slowly spread into the cedar bark scrapings as I lightly blew onto them.

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    I was so paranoid about trying to film all of this and make it work at the same time. About 30 seconds or so later the bundle started to heavily smoke and I knew I was almost there! Then POOF! Combustion took place! I couldn't believe it! I pulled it off! The one thing I thought was nearly impossible to do on this venture, I did. I was so damn proud of myself, I howled like a wolf.

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    Whoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!

    Continued!!...
     
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  14. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    With the fire sustained, I now gathered up my cache of food. I made a cooking spit out of the the rest of the basswood sapling and went about scaling and gutting the fish. Again, the 90 degree spine worked well and the blade eviscerated the fish no problem. I don't consider any knife broken in until it has some blood on it that's not mine.

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    Bush kitchen was now set up.

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    Next up it was Kermit's turn to be split. No problemo. The knife chopped through the amphibian like it wasn't even there. I placed the frog legs on a split branch over the coals.

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    I then wrapped up some of the other fish up in some basswood leaves and tossed them onto the coals once they were ready.

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    With the fire going and my time now running short I was feeling rushed . Quiver needed something to go with it so while my fish were cooking I chopped down the straightest hazel brush shoot I could find. It was time to make an arrow.

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    Continued...
     
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  15. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I cut the shoot and as I was debarking it I stopped to check on my appetizer. It was ready, so I had a quick snack. It was delicious and I wish I had 4 more or just one really big one.

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    I took out an old deer jawbone out of my pack that I had found earlier this past spring, and bored a hole into it with the Persian. The knife had no issues in this task. I now I had an arrow straightener.

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    Once the hole was bored large enough to accept the hazel shoot, I heated the shaft over the fire and started to bend the kinks out using the jawbone as a lever.

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    Looking good.

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    Because I knew I wanted to make an arrow in the field, I took some materials in my back to help me out. Besides the jaw bone, I had some back sinew from a buck a shot a couple of years back, some turkey feathers from the bird I killed this past spring https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/turkey-scout-and-successful-multi-day-hunt.222955/, and a small stone point which I had acquired through trade some time ago.

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    I went about splitting down the turkey wing feathers along the quills. The scandi-wedge of the Persian worked well for this. To do this you just stick the knife into a natural groove in the quill. Then you just stab the whole works into a log and while keeping the knife blade static you can slowly pull the feather towards you and the feather will just follow the blade.

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    After the quills were split and trimmed, I cut them to length. I could have lowered the feather height by trimming it down, but this was just going to be a demo arrow so I wasn't worry about excessive drag.

    Continued...
     
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  16. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Next I notched out the fore shaft for the arrow head. I wish I could say I used a rock or shell for this purpose but to save time I used the saw on my SAK Walker (which is another great knife). The head sat well in the shaft.

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    It was time to strip some sinew. That's right, none of that fake waxed nylon stuff for this guy.

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    To process sinew for this kind of use, I just pull and strip off a thread to the thickness I want. Now comes the cool part. You pop that 2 year old, dried piece of animal tissue into your mouth and you start going at it like Neanderthal chewing gum. You don't want to chew it too long because you'll loose the substance that makes it act like a glue. Once it “feels right” you just remove it from your mouth with out gagging.

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    This is the best selfie I have ever taken. I can't quit tell if I'm on drugs or if I'm about to puke. I seriously don't why I had that look on my face but I sure was cracking up once I downloaded that photo! I should make that my new avatar. Anyway, I digress.

    So once it's ready it will be limp like a noodle.

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    You can now just start wrapping it around the arrow head and tie a simple square knot to finish it. When the sinew dries it will shrink, binding everything up tight.

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    I will now attach the feather the same way.

    First I tie on the front of each feather, one at a time. I spaced them each out to where I want them. Once each feather is individually secured, I Then I make a wrap that covers around all the feathers at once. This wrap is knotted and another is string of sinew it attached which I spiral down the shaft, while running it through the feather its self. Once you reach the end, you can do another complete wrap to secure the back of all the feathers at once. You shouldn't need to do the separate wraps for the ends because all the feathers are now secured in place once you get to this point.

    100_1558.JPG

    100_1559.JPG


    100_1560.JPG

    Continued...
     
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  17. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    We now have a finished, field-expedient arrow.

    100_1561.JPG

    100_1562.JPG

    100_1564.JPG
    Photo of this "North Woods Savage" showing the quiver in use, while pretending to stalk a 2 lb bullfrog. I should have stuck with my hand modeling career.

    With an arrow now ready for its new home, I decided to jazz up the quiver. I quickly made a short length of 2 ply reverse twist cordage from dead grass and attached a turkey tail feather to my quiver with it. Now it has a soul!

    100_1566.JPG

    Some of the days tools...all made with help from the Persian.

    100_1569.JPG

    Now it is time to chow down.

    100_1570.JPG

    Oh no! In all the excitement I forgot to take the burdock and ramps out of my pack. Damn. Oh well. I diced the ramps up to go with the fish I steamed in the leaves. I really wanted to steam the fish with the ramps to add flavor but oh, well. I just tossed the burdock on the coals left them. I didn't have time to cook those up.

    100_1573.JPG

    100_1574.JPG

    100_1575.JPG

    Burdock..NO GO!

    The Persian didn't fair well at slicing the ramps. It just kind of split them up as I cut. Like I said before,. It's no slicer. But I can say this, it will get you by in the woods for a day or three if that's all you have. I'll let this knife's actions speaks for it's self and you can make your own judgments on it's merits.

    Thanks for taking the time to read all of this babble. I enjoyed partaking in this challenge and I hope you enjoyed reading about it.

    I'd also like to thank the many contributing members of BCUSA who made this trip what it was. Many things I have read or seen on this forum helped to inspire the events, ideas and actions of this outing. And a big thanks again to @t.darrah and @Calafia666 who helped make this free entertainment happen for the masses of BCUSA.
     
  18. oathkeeper762

    oathkeeper762 Bushbum & PT Wanderer Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Epic post, great day in the field. Congrats on your bowdrill Fire, the rush is certainly “howl worthy”! Well done my friend.
     
  19. x39

    x39 Hyperborean Supporter

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    Outstanding report! Nicely done my friend.
     
  20. jasam

    jasam Scout

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  21. LJHfrstr

    LJHfrstr Supporter Supporter Bushclass I

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    Wasn't expecting BCUSA to consume 20 minutes of my morning, but this post made it happen.
     
  22. dub

    dub Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Awesome. Thanks for sharing bud.
     
  23. J. Pierce

    J. Pierce Perpetually Off Topic, Sorry. Supporter

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    Cheeses rice man!
    If your goal was to make me feel like a real lazy armchair woodsman........... Achievement Level Unlocked!

    It was enough effort to do it all, but then to photograph it and document it and write it all up and share it........... there's barely enough daylight to pull it off.

    Thanks man, awesome and inspiring!
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2018
  24. Sandcut

    Sandcut Sed ego sum homo indomitus Vendor

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    Outstanding!

    That was a truly great outing. I would say that your knowledge of your area and skill set are equaled by only a few here. This reminded me of some of @GreenFrog's foraging posts blended with @NWPrimate's stuff-making ability.
     
  25. Hoof

    Hoof Former Genius Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Excellent! You made me feel like a city boy, I need to re-assess my skills.
     
  26. SpookyPistolero

    SpookyPistolero Slow learner Lifetime Supporter

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    Good lord, save some bushcraft for the rest of us slobs!

    Killer outing and impressive breadth of skills demonstrated. I really wish I could ramp up my edibles /foraging knowledge to that level!
     
  27. GoKartz

    GoKartz Sharpaholic

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    Wow. That was an awesome outting. My main question though is... how do I get sinew like that from my next deer?
     
  28. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter

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  29. Sandcut

    Sandcut Sed ego sum homo indomitus Vendor

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    Hell, I'm exhausted just seeing that it took almost 4 hours just to post the thread.

    Now I'm going to go tie a piece of colored string to a ferro rod and convince myself that I'm "bushcrafting" .

    :D
     
  30. NWPrimate

    NWPrimate Supporter Supporter

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    Wow! :35: This is a hall of fame level post, and one of my favorite trip reports ever! There is enough proper action here to fill a month, and you packed it all into one day. Of course the first friction fire ember has a special place in my heart; but that quiver, arrow, the fish and frog, edible plants, spear, cordage, bone tools, knife skills...damn dude.

    Outstanding. Just outstanding. :dblthumb:
     
  31. Seeker

    Seeker Woods Bum Supporter Bushclass I

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    Wow... This was great. nothing feels better than feeding yourself and the satisfaction that comes from being able to make a coal... i personally get a special pleasure from eating venison cooked over a fire while camping 100 yards from where i killed it... glad you got to use the gig... i was disappointed for you at first.

    and thanks for taking the time to document it all... that's one of the hardest things to do; perform the task, AND photograph it well. this is probably in the "Top 5 Trip Reports".
     
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  32. rsnurkle

    rsnurkle Supporter Supporter Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Arrrrooooooooooooooooo!! Awesome, awesome trip report! You really did justice to the spirit of the passaround! Thank you so much for putting in the effort to do, record and share all of this, I'm going to be coming back to this trip for years to come for inspiration!
     
  33. SmilinJoe

    SmilinJoe Supporter Supporter

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    Man, that was an excellent display of skills! Congrats on your friction fire success and Thanks for going through the effort to bring this to us. I do think your sinew chewing picture should be made into a poster sized display of the mind numbing qualities of chewing said sinew. They're already doing bath salts and tide pods, this is probably better for them. All jokes aside hats off to your skills and knowledge.
     
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  34. Jim L.

    Jim L. Guide

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    Well Done, Brother. Thank you for draggin' my big ol' butt with you. I'm really feeling my "wannabe" status now..
     
  35. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    Well... what a great trip and report. You were up half the night just to document this.

    My cheeks are sore from grinning... this is me starting at the first post:

    906AC4B7-0593-40C3-8828-9A299F0888CF.jpeg

    I DO hope this is the first chapter of the book. ;)
     
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  36. The Warrior

    The Warrior Architect of Fire

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    Awesome. Freaking...awesome. :dblthumb:
     
  37. roadend

    roadend Wandering Where I Can Supporter

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    Great trip. Next time someone asks "What is Bushcraft?" A link to this trip report sums it up well. Thanks for documenting and posting.
     
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  38. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Thank you everyone for the kind words! I appreciate it!

    When you butcher your deer this patch of sinew can be found running along the top side of each back strap. It will look like silver in color. Just the back straps out and flip one over so the sinew side is down. Carefully cut into the center of the back strap (dividing it in two sides) go slow once you reach the bottom because you don't want to cut through the sinew, it's pretty cut resistant but be careful anyways. Once you reach the sinew just turn your knife and fillet the sinew off of the back strap. One fillet cut will to the left and one to the right. This will leave with you two cuts of meat and one relatively clean strip of sinew. Take a butter knife, metal spoon, clamshell etc., and scrape off the remaining meat.

    Once you have the strips cleaned lay them on a piece of wax paper to air dry (keep away from dogs or they will eat it) when it's dry just store in a plastic freezer bag.

    100_1660.JPG

    This yearling above, has short, thin sections of sinew on it's back. They are the silver gray colored patches in the center of back on each side of it's spine. Thicker bundles of sinew can be had by taking the lower leg tendons and fore leg tendons too....but these need to smashed and processed more when dried in order to get usable threads. This leg sinew pieces can be pounded separated, and then used to back a bow's limbs for extra strength and durability. I hope this helps.

    It felt like a lot more work posting this, than actually doing it! lol.

    Thanks again everyone.
     
  39. NevadaBlue

    NevadaBlue Graybeard Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    A test: If this is OK with you @Primordial , I will make the remaining parts. It looks like it will take 4 or 5 parts to do your outing in PDF form. This is the first 5 posts.

    There are FOUR parts. This thread is too important to just leave as a thread. Hopefully the PDF files will be enjoyed too. I will be carrying them with me on my iPad all the time. :dblthumb:
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 14, 2018
  40. Primordial

    Primordial MOA #40 Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    Have at it, my friend!
     
  41. GoKartz

    GoKartz Sharpaholic

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    @Primordial - so basically save the silverskins next time I cut them off the backstrap and air dry them and then I can be super cool like you!
     
  42. woodsmanjohn

    woodsmanjohn Supporter Supporter Bushclass II

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    Awesome!!! Post Primordial, excellent skills shown in your post buddy. Great work with all of it man.
     
  43. CowboyJesus

    CowboyJesus Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    dude, that is an epic outing!!! is there anything you can't do out there? way to embody what everyone here probably wishes they could-and were-doing!
     
  44. Paul Foreman

    Paul Foreman Supporter Supporter

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    about as fine a photo instructional as i have seen here. well done ...
     
  45. pab1

    pab1 Supporter Supporter Bushclass III Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    Amazing outing! I really enjoyed that! Thanks for sharing!
     
  46. Seahunter

    Seahunter Scout Bushclass I Bushclass II

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    You are clearly a good fishermen. This is one of my favorite trip reports. You did a great job in the field and writing this all up. Its a lot of work, but these are the types of threads we all come here to see, so thanks for putting it together for us. Congratulations on getting an ember. That is a terrific feeling.
     
  47. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog In the Forest Supporter Hardwoodsman Bushclass III

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    Whoooooohooooo! You have passed your tryout for the Alone show. That thread was so full of action and skills. Great stuff!!
     
  48. kcardwel

    kcardwel Hardwoodsman Hobbyist Supporter Hardwoodsman Bushclass III

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    Super post; really enjoyed it...makes me want to get out there right away
     
  49. gohammergo

    gohammergo I like sharp things.... Supporter

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    So, @Primordial , looks like you knocked it out of the park this time. :) Well done my friend. :)
     
  50. GoFeesh

    GoFeesh Tracker

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    Amazing outing!!!! You have got some mad skills.
     

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