Puzzled on how to paint camo?

Discussion in 'Other Skills' started by Lode, Feb 2, 2017.

  1. Lode

    Lode making kerf Supporter

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    I wanted to share an idea. I'm not sure if it's ever been done. If so, credit to the originator.

    BCUSA has given me a lot of insight and knowledge recently, and I wanted to give back.

    I really enjoy camo and concealment. I like the digital stuff but find the colors sometimes difficult to match where I get my 'dirt time' in. MARPAT woodland is my personal digital favorite. ACU I find utterly useless and don't own any pieces of gear that have that particular pattern.

    After reading about folks using leafs, bramble and brush to paint on camo, I thought of this idea... painting camo with puzzle pieces to attain my desired effect...

    Is this idea outside the box, or truly inside the box?! Hehe.

    used a combo of 4 flat finish camo paints, Walmart, I think
    IMG_20170111_113912759.jpg
    OD, will dry flat.
    IMG_20170111_114039223_HDR.jpg
    after the the first of 2 light browns used.
    IMG_20170111_121033290_HDR.jpg
    The bin with dark brown applied.
    IMG_20170111_121631748.jpg
    finished products...
    IMG_20170111_132827305.jpg
    IMG_20170111_132834279.jpg
    Of course, results may vary. You may find that you'll spend a little more time adjusting your puzzle bin to accommodate getting a good pattern on things that aren't flat/boxy. Flatter, smooth sided shapes work much much better.
    I have a Remington 597 HB that'll get painted next and then onto an AR. I don't mind the paint chipping and exposing the black underneath. I like that 'used' look, personally. For those seeking a more permanent finish, consider using a flat finish clear coat.

    You can obviously use different sized pieces or even something totally different to add to the desired effects. The serious folks use leaves and brush that are going to be in the area they're expecting to need concealment to give proper shape blend to the environment. I've painted a few pieces of gear this way. It's quite a bit more time consuming when you add harvesting your silhouette material.

    I hope this is useful to someone, take the idea and run with it!
    Special thanks to @NattyBo for prompting me to share this idea.
     
  2. marbleman

    marbleman Supporter Supporter

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    I read about this concept in the 80's, and used to paint several things; motorcycle gas tanks, truck toolboxes, etc.

    I gathered local leaves and handfuls of straw for stencils, and used four colors of rattlecan paint, and in this order: olive drab, brown, yellow primer and black.

    Paint said item solid olive drab, let it dry to tacky. Then place leaves (or whatever you are stenciling) on top of it, about two per foot. Spray everything with brown.

    While leaving the first leaves on
    , spread out more leaves, still trying to be about two per square foot.

    Then, keep doing it. leave the previous stencils in place, lay down more, spray with yellow, lay down more, then finish with black. By the time you get to the last two colors, you can see that you only really need to spray the gaps, because quite a bit will be already covered. After the last color, carefully pick off all the stencils and let it dry.

    In very general terms, it seems to work better with larger leaves first, then tapering down to smaller leaves, and straw for the last. Overlap each layer a little bit, and you come out with this eerie 3D looking camouflage. Practice on some cardboard and experiment with different stencils and different spacing. It works best for them to be flat, curly leaves don't work well. Don't like leaves? Cut out your own stencils from brown paper bags. Maybe you could make some funky urban camouflage with different colors. Keyrings, old shoesoles, gloves, and parking meter heads for stencils.

    I was painting larger things, so obviously two per foot is not right for small items. Big flat things are easy. It's also kind of fun.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
  3. werewolf won

    werewolf won TANSTAAFL Supporter Bushcraft Friend

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    I made spare money in school painting goalie masks, motor cycle helmets and tanks and tins and the sides of vans, but I got to say this is one of the coolest ways to paint I’ve seen in ages. Outstanding!!
     
  4. NattyBo

    NattyBo Bon Vivant Supporter

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    The hardest part is putting the puzzle back together. Great job brother!
     
  5. sledjockey

    sledjockey Skookum's Bro Supporter Bushclass I

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    Looks much easier than the stupid stencils I use.
     
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  6. Lode

    Lode making kerf Supporter

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    Thanks for the kind words.

    LOL! Am I the only one that, as soon as I open up a puzzle box, I just eat a piece so that I know for sure it'll end in disappointment?! j/k
     
  7. crewhead05

    crewhead05 Supporter Supporter

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    DUDE! that is a phenomenal idea. Thanks for sharing it.
     
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  8. Lode

    Lode making kerf Supporter

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    My pleasure. With all of the dump of knowledge BCUSA has given me in the last 2 weeks, I needed to give back. My father always said 'always give more than you take son.' I hope I can find a few more things that are new ideas for my fellow BCers.
     
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  9. Crusher0032

    Crusher0032 Scout

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    Looks great! I love painting gear. To get more of the digital look, you can spray through this stuff to get squares:
    Darice Stiff Plastic Canvas 7 Count 12"X18"-Clear | Jo-Ann

    You can spray camo like you already have there then put this over the rifle and spray contrasrting colors to get squares. Works very well and is cheap. I did a pawn shop Remington 700 stock many years ago and sold it for a $100 profit based on the paint.

    Those things are awesome for fixing ATV plastics as well, just put behind a crack and heat gun it in place.
     
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  10. bo'sun carl

    bo'sun carl Scout

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    WOW!! I don't thnk I ave ever seen a camo job done with puzzle pieces before. Well done.

    Carl
     
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  11. twyych

    twyych Supporter Supporter

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    I'm going to have to do this with my shotgun. Thanks for sharing the idea!
     
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  12. Lode

    Lode making kerf Supporter

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    I'll have to stop in at Jo-Ann sometime and check it out. Fortunately it's just across the mall from Dunhams where I like to browse gear/guns.

    Thanks fellas, my pleasure.
     
  13. remington79

    remington79 Scout

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    I sprayed one of my rifles just going old school woodland. I can't remember what color I used as the base, it might have been the khaki. Then I just used brown and OD and would let the colors over lap where they meet. Then I held the brown and OD cans (one at color at each spot) and spray it over the khaki. By doing this the color still stayed khaki but the overspray of the other color would tone down how bright it was. I only used khaki, OD, and brown.
    Some might call it overkill but I was bored and it's better than all black. it beats holding what would be seen as a big black stick.
     

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  14. Chief55

    Chief55 Scout

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    Looks great. I think you might be on to something and should field test it to see how good it works for you. While stationed in N.C. I was wearing some woodland blaze orange camo leaning up against a mangrove tree in a swamp and had 2 bucks, one behind the other run by me no more than 4 feet from me. Yes I did shoot the one out in front. My barrel was only about a foot from him. The second one was a bit bigger a ran on the other side and behind me so I could not get a good ethical shot at him when I recovered from the first one. That convinced me that they can not see in color and blaze orange is in no way a problem for deer hunting. My experience is the mammals do not see in color but the birds do see in color. Just put that out there as you mess around with colors and lots of us are forced to wear blaze orange. For the animals it is not the color that is important, it is the pattern. The animals key in on movement, if you remain still they will not notice you. Really good hunters key in on movement as well. You see a tail move or ears move then you see the whole picture and he is busted.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
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  15. remington79

    remington79 Scout

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    From what I understand deer see in shades of grey/black and white though I do rmember at one point hearing that they can see some blueish colors. I figured a black rifle in greyish sight is going to be a black horizontal line that sticks out. I confirmed it using picture editing software and just turning on the black and white filter.
     
  16. Idabow

    Idabow Tracker

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    Deer see in dichromatic yellows and blues. Red is the brightest color deer can't see. Blue practically glows in the dark to them.

    Most mammals that can see in the dark see things in black and white. Most mammals that can't see in the dark, do see in color.

    Squirrels do not see well in the dark, that's why they don't run the trees in the dark. They do see colors very well which is why hunters will wear camo.
     

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