Recipe Sticky

Discussion in 'Cooking & Water Purification' started by SluggySlugworth, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. Herman30

    Herman30 Tracker

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    Traditional food for people working in the woods I E kolbulle.

    Batter of water and wheatflour, thick like a pancake batter + lard for frying + some smoked meat for taste.

    Melt lard in pan to get a layer of a couple millimeter of melted fat. Put in the smoked meat and pour over batter. Fry until one side is done and flip over. Fry other side until doe. Eat.

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. RangerWeaver

    RangerWeaver Woodloafer Supporter

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    I would like the recipe!
     
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  3. grey mouse

    grey mouse Scout

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    For anyone that is interested this is how I clean my grease. I cook all of the bacon in a large cast iron pan on medium low. Getting the grease too hot ruins it in my opinion. Once finished i pour all of the grease into a four cup measuring cup and start washing up. I take a quart mason jar and place a funnel style coffee filter down into the mouth and fold the last inch over the rim of the jar. This allows me to take a jar lid and screw it onto the jar keeping the filter in place. As I wash dishes I simply pour enough grease into the jar to top it off. The little pour spout on the measuring cup is great for this. Once I have scrapped the last bit out of the cup I place a top over the jar and set aside so that it can drip for awhile. When ready simply remove ring, toss filter, and wipe rim before placing the top on and securing it. Once it's set overnight in the fridge it will slowly become a beautiful shade of white and is free of debris.

    Tips:
    1) Grease that gets too hot will cool to a brown or tan color.
    2) By putting it in the cup and letting it set a few minutes you allow the bits to settle and not clog the filter right away. We want the bits to sit in last and drip.
    3) If you squeeze the last bit out of the filter be careful as it is hot and the filter may rupture dropping the bits into the jar

    Fry Bacon (excuse the crappy thin bacon that I bought)
    [​IMG]
    Pour bacon grease into measuring cup
    [​IMG]
    Place filter on rim
    [​IMG]
    Place ring on jar and pour in grease slowly in small amounts
    [​IMG]
    Place top on jar to let it sit and drip
    [​IMG]
    This is the final product from three different meals. Notice the absence of various shades of grease or impurities
    [​IMG]
     
  4. RangerWeaver

    RangerWeaver Woodloafer Supporter

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  5. grey mouse

    grey mouse Scout

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    Thank you
     
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  6. grey mouse

    grey mouse Scout

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    When I'm making chicken stock from left over unwanted parts, boiling a whole bird for my three gallons of chicken and dumplings, or scavenging the fat from a roasted duck I always save it for making a flaky pie crust, chicken gravy, or roasted duck gravy for mashed potatoes. Simply skim the fat off into a grease separator and retain the fat. Place in the fridge. If you don't have a grease separator then skim fat and water into a jar. Place in fridge for a few hours. Once hardened remove fat and place in a pan quickly as it will melt. Heat slowly to remove residual water but do not boil. Pour through a fine mesh towel (if needed) into a clean jar and place back in the refrigerator until ready to use.

    I haven't stopped to measure out the ingredients for gravy in so long that I may be off a little in the amounts. All of my homemade chicken broth is salt free. The salt, bullion base, and cream are optional especially if your using store bought broth that is loaded with salt and msg.

    Fresh Chicken Gravy
    2Tbsp Chicken fat/1Tbsp Chicken fat and 1 Tbsp of Butter
    2-3 Tbsp All purpose flour
    1.5-2 Cups Chicken broth (1.5 cups if using cream)
    1 Tad of Celtic Grey Sea Salt (to taste)
    1/2 Cup Heavy Cream (optional)
    1 Tbsp Chicken Bullion (optional)

    1) Place fat into a pot on medium.
    2) Add flour until it's thick enough to pull away from the sides and ball up. Once hot it will "flow" or melt onto the bottom of the pot. Start stirring the rue slowly and don't stop.
    3) Cook for 3-5min or until the mixture has a slight almond like smell. Don't overcook as we are not making brown gravy.
    4) Add chilled broth to mixture slowly while stirring. I do this in three to four steps to avoid lumps. Remember: Hot mix with cold liquid equals no lumps. Mix thoroughly each time before adding more broth.
    5) Add cream if desired.
    6) Bring to a boil for about two minutes or until the desired consistency (nappe consistency at least) is achieved. It will thicken slightly more as it cools.
    7) Enjoy

    Tips:
    1)
    The optional cream is in case you want a gravy that is more of a bechamel style gravy. A creamy gravy is sometimes great over mashed or whole potatoes (small).
    2) If using home made chicken broth remember to taste the broth and add any salt and/or bullion that is needed for the correct chicken flavor level.
     
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  7. bacpacjac

    bacpacjac Queen of the Cups Supporter Bushclass I

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    Rather than risk further derailing the Fried Oatmeal or Cabbage Rolls threads, here my recipe for homemade ham hock and split green pea soup.

    Step 1 - In a soup pot, saute:
    • a couple of small carrots
    • a couple ribs of celery
    • a couple of small onions with a few sprigs of fresh Thyme and a little Olive oil or bacon fat.
    PB186983.JPG

    Step 2 - When they're soft, add a smoked & cured ham hock and about 900 grams of dried split peas. I add a Bay leaf and some garlic at this point too. Then cover the works with chicken stock. I let it simmer all day, then pull all the meat off the bone and add it back to the soup with a few diced up potatoes. When the potatoes are ready, so is the soup.

    PB186999.JPG

    Bacon's a great addition, but I didn't have any this weekend. :(
     
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  8. RangerWeaver

    RangerWeaver Woodloafer Supporter

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    @bacpacjac thanks for the recipe! Looks like I have something to try with the next ham hock I buy.
     
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  9. NESurvival

    NESurvival Tracker

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    Creole Seasoning?
     
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  10. zelph

    zelph Guide

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    This is the color of ground cloves:

    [​IMG]

    Powdered "orange zest"

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2019
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  11. Enzo

    Enzo Supporter Supporter

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    The only recipes that I’ve created myself are pretty lame, but I enjoy them. I make my “real” meals from a cookbook that my mom got me before college, so the majority of the recipes I use aren’t mine.

    Here are a few that I’ve come up with.

    —Toasted sourdough bread. Spread fresh avocado on top, add salt and lime/lemon. Tajin also goes well on this.

    —Top Ramen (chicken flavor). Add cut-up steak or chicken, mushrooms, and a sliced bell pepper. Trader Joes’ Asian Sauce is really good to add into this as well.

    —toast with peanut butter and honey

    —mix each of these after cooking each one individually (at least, that’s how I’ve done it) rice, beans, tomato (not cooked), chicken or steak, lettuce, onion, diced bell pepper, cilantro, sour cream, and a whole lot of lime. Adding some pepper is good too.
     
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