Rethinking my GHB

Discussion in 'Preparedness' started by NJStricker, Jul 18, 2018.

  1. NJStricker

    NJStricker Supporter Supporter

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    If you have or had a get home bag and had to rebuild it, what would you do differently?

    I haven't given much thought to mine recently. For the last several years my office has been in the small town where I live. Being less than 5 miles from home I didn't put much thought into gear--I would just walk home, and depending on weather I should be there in an hour or so.

    In a few weeks all that will change as my office is being moved to Columbus and I will be 20+ miles away and in a denser urban environment.

    I'm not planning for any TEOTWAWKI scenario or zombie apocalypse. Most likely scenario is typical commuter routes are shut down, so I either stay put in my truck until conditions improve, or for some reason I'm forced to go on foot to find shelter in suburbia or push on to get home.

    In no particular order, I'm thinking of re-tooling a kit around the following: communications, security, core body temp (shelter, calories), and transportation. I'm looking closely at Hill People Gear's Equipage Levels as a resource: https://www.hillpeoplegear.com/Education/Equipage

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    I agree about the core body temp.

    Dry and warm: Extra socks, watch cap, extra layer, scarf, and gloves. I keep this stuff in a separate sack and in the summer would just leave it in the car. Raincoat or a Poncho but a poncho doubles as a shelter.

    Mobility: Keep appropriate shoes in your car if you can't wear them daily. I strongly suggest you get one of those anti-chafe sticks (they look like deodorant.)

    Food: No-cook meals (protein bars and the like) and electrolyte replacement.

    Comms: Battery for the cell phone, maybe a little ham radio if you have a license.

    Transportation: Keep some cash in smaller denominations to pay for rides, taxis, or gas. Keep Lyft or Uber apps on your phone.

    Security: Very personal choices here, but I carry a pistol & I have pepper spray in the car. I also have a small carbine "truck gun" but I know that is a little out there for some. I also have a machete and crow bar in the back. Those are more for tools but obviously could be pressed into service for self defense.

    Don't forget First Aid: A boo-boo/cut kit and a trauma kit. Don't bother carrying anything you don't know how to use. Get some training (if you don't have it already) to carry the basic stuff.

    Water: A good bottle and just one of those small Frontier Pro filters is a pretty good option for a GHB. 50 gallons is likely to get you home.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2018
  3. Medic17

    Medic17 Supporter Supporter Bushcraft Friend Bushclass I

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    I have rebuilt mine many times over the years, I think of it as a ever evolving process.

    The kits are designed to get me home.
    For me a sub 25L pack is a good starting point.

    I loosely build my kits off of the 10 C's.
    I do not follow it exactly but modify it to fit my needs.
    Mine are not for sustained living but to buy time and assist in rescue.

    First Documented Design
    https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/12-4-lbs-of-get-home-rate-and-review.111921/
    I really liked this design, I believe I will use this as my base and change some gear around.

    Second Attempt
    https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/24-hour-bag-part-ii.152197/#post-2617160
    This is more of a camping setup. It is heavier in the food and thermal regulation.

    Ultralight
    https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/threads/psk-kits-discussion.193189/


    Just some random thoughts.

    Thermal Regulation is my highest priority.
    I almost always carry my ORC Windbreaker everywhere I go.
    More hardened protection will include a poncho, fleece, hat etc.

    Water is my second.
    I like to carry it with me. The source may be hard to come by.
    None the less, you need a means to purify some.
    Silcock Key?

    Yes I carry food, usually 2,000 calories.
    It will keep me well fed for a day, ready to go for the next.
    OR
    It will give 4 people one decent meal.

    I have moved away from redundancy. (This includes repair tools.)
    Check and maintain your gear.
    I rotate mine 2x a year.

    My next goal will be a sub 10lb Ultralight setup.

    I find keeping the extra layers in the truck in a separate bag works better for me.
     
  4. LongChinJon

    LongChinJon Scout

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    Good info here. Make sure what you carry is legal. No point in making a situation worse by ending up locked up overnight.

    Be equipped to spend the night in your vehicle without the engine running.

    I would suggest keeping your bag non-threatening in appearance. You may be able to get a ride home if you cannot travel on your own. A road safety vest or hi-viz reflective backpack cover might help keep you from getting hit by a vehicle if you plan to walk near roadways.
     
  5. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    Regarding bag choice- I agree with keeping it low profile. I have a North Face Recon that I have used for over a decade. In fact, I have another one that is my EDC bag.

    Really, my EDC bag is a GHB in it's own right. In some ways it's more legit as it has my first line gear and the car GHB has somewhat lesser quality stuff.
     
  6. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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    Dang! I totally forgot about maps and wayfinding!

    GPS, compass, and offline trail apps on your phone. Compass and hardcopy maps in your bag.
     
  7. thederrick106

    thederrick106 Hunter Supporter Bushclass I

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    I am about 30 miles from my work and have really developed a minimalist style when it comes to the "GHB" topic. I always have the primary gear on me, or close.

    Good multi tool or folder.

    Spare blade.

    lighter.

    flashlight.

    paracord.

    Very small FAK.

    Cell phone charging cable.

    Permanent marker.

    Note pad or a few bits of scrap paper.

    Small power bank/ pocket size.

    2m/440 hand held HT radio. I am one of those ham radio/ survivalist guys so its programed with everything I might need for comm should networks go down. I don't bring this when I am on my motorcycle.

    Water bottle... I don't always have one when I ride my motorcycle but I have one in my locker at work.

    Same goes for food, I don't carry food to and from, I have some emergency supplies stashed at work I could bring with me if necessary.

    I also leave spare boots/ socks/ cloths at work.

    I keep a small tarp in my trucks tool box, along with spare cloths, but the chances of me stopping and sheltering in place if I am forced on foot to go home is pretty slim. I am confident on my skill set, and use of discarded/natural materials that I get through most realistic situations with minimal gear.

    With all that said I think its very important not to overload with gear. Same goes for BOB mentality. 72 hours max... After that what are you really doing? Walking aimlessly in the "woods" is not the answer. Go to family, friends, heck rent a hotel room if you can. Many in the "survival" world forget to look at the least likely scenarios and plan for them first. What has happened around the world in the last century? Things like weather events are real and happen all the time. Same goes with other localized disasters.

    Even through the depression we didn't revert to the stone ages. That's not to discount a good skill set but its nice to see others with a realistic mindset on this topic!

    Bravo OP!
     
  8. mtwarden

    mtwarden roaming the Big Sky Supporter

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  9. Foulwind

    Foulwind Guide

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    My bag of goodies:

    GHB/EDC

    Bag, Small ALICE, Black

    3 outer pockets contain;

    Pocket 1 Fire kit in small peanut butter jar, containing PCB, Fatwood, dryer lint, fero rod and striker.
    Pocket 2 Utility pocket , multi tool, hemo-stat, 50' hank of para-cord. Buck folder (Buck101)
    Pocket 3 Cook kit, Stanley cook kit, Green cup, chicken bouillon cubes, hikers stuff towel (Only 2.5 “in size)

    Main pocket contains;

    5X7 tarp,
    Emergency mylar (Thin Film type) blanket
    Canteen fire stove
    Mini foresters hatchet (A tiny one)
    Folding saw (Corona)
    Plastic container with glow stick, sewing needles 30lb braid fish line Duct tape rolls x2
    2 squares folded up of heavy duty aluminum foil (Approx. 1 Ft sq each)
    1946 GI mess kit, with utensils
    3 or 4 Mountain house meals, packaged tuna and salmon.
    Small waterproof bag
    1 Qt plastic canteen
    100’ utility rope strapped to bottom of the pack.
    New Mini Sawyer water filter, it's straw, syringe and collapsible bottle

    Exterior attached pocket;

    Latex gloves
    Small 2-3 oz bottle of lamp oil (For spreading fire quickly)
    1980's Tanto blade attached to side of main compartment

    Truck carry:

    Small shovel
    Camp axe (24” handle, hardware store varity)
    1.25lb hatchet
    Bag with MRE’s (Mainly Mountain house, packaged salmon and tuna, rice)
    10X10’ 4 mil plastic tarp (Used from house, cut to size, rolled up)
    Dual blanket, (Fleece one side vinyl other) in sack
    Tire chains, winching/towing, dragging chains
    Gold pans X2
    Spot light
    First aid kits x2 one commercial, one home built.
    Case of water bottles (For commute)

    I'm sure I'm forgetting some small items, but for the most part I think I got most. I haven't "Re-thought" my bag yet, haven't had to use my bag other than the green cup for tea while at work (Ran out of cups at coffee stations)!


     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2018
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  10. NJStricker

    NJStricker Supporter Supporter

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    @Medic17 thanks for the links, I remember some of those threads now.

    I almost always have on me 2 knives in my pockets. Last year when the belt clip for my phone broke I started using a small belt pouch. Besides my phone I have a small flashlight, a Leatherman, a Sharpie, a Bic, and emergency cash.

    I usually have a water bottle nearby. I’m starting to see filter inserts for water bottles and am thinking that might be the way to go. No need to stop for a fire to boil water, no need to wait for chemicals to finish killing microbes.

    The chemlight is a good idea.

    I don’t have a ham license but have considered one as a backup to a cell phone.

    I too am moving away from redundancy. I’d like to get down to one GHB kit for my truck and one grab and go fun woods kit.
     
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  11. Paulyseggs

    Paulyseggs Supporter Supporter

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    Lighter than u think u need

    Wear it now and then and do some hikes .

    Other than basic necessity we are not in a void . We have stuff all around to utilize .

    But everyone's necessity is different .
    For me the first thing I pack is glasses and contact lens . I'm near legally blind without them . 2nd thing is socks ...

    I try to keep my bag under 15lb .Closer to 12 . Winter gets tough cause of xtra clothing i pack in there .

    Food I pack a jar or pb . 18oz good for 3days of eating . water filter . Mylar heatsheet .Etc ..
     
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  12. Unistat76

    Unistat76 Nerd Supporter Bushclass I

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  13. Bryan King

    Bryan King Hobbyist Hobbyist

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    It's a GHB, so remember to keep it light. Only include what you need .
     
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